The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    14,377
    Likes Received:
    827
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    I've done this and it works (no fridge though).
     
  2. suited

    suited Senior member

    Messages:
    6,454
    Likes Received:
    2,730
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2008
    Speaking of paint, get a few estimates. It's free. Be sure to inquire about the specifics - paint brand and line, number of coats, etc. Make sure you're comparing apples to apples. We recently had most of our home painted and the quotes varied by nearly $1,000 from cheapest to most expensive, using benjamin moore regal paint. We got a little break on the price because the house was completely empty with concrete floors in the areas that needed painting (minus one room) - so not much prep work there in terms of covering furniture and flooring, allowing them to just work faster in general.
     
  3. lefty

    lefty Senior member

    Messages:
    9,584
    Likes Received:
    1,837
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    I have a stick up my ass when it comes to painting. I was trained by a master painter over a couple of summers and have held every painter since to a pretty high standard. And I am a very good painter.

    Side note: you know who else was a good painter? Hitler.


    Other than my current guy, I've never seen someone come in with sanders to flatten between coats. I also ask him to paint a lot of dark colours which can be a pain in the ass. My present foyer is dark seal (sort of a grey/brown) with a near black baseboard for example. The previous owner put a corian surround on the fireplace, so I asked my guy to paint it gloss black until I can figure out what I want to do with it. He sealed the "stone" with automotive paint then sprayed the gloss on to ensure no roller/brush marks. Most guys would have just put on a primer and colour with a roller.

    Anyway, the movers fucked some walls up so I need to have him back to redo a few things. That's also included in his overall cost.

    lefty
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    14,384
    Likes Received:
    2,047
    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2006
    Location:
    The wild and the pure.
    Our painters sand and screen between coats. IIRC, that was part of a specified level five finish.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  5. lefty

    lefty Senior member

    Messages:
    9,584
    Likes Received:
    1,837
    Joined:
    Oct 27, 2006
    Level Five ... nice.

    lefty
     
  6. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,146
    Likes Received:
    1,564
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    If you're doing gloss I guess that might be worth it. It's overkill for flat paint though, with the caveat that they ought to sand down drips and the like.
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2013
  7. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,146
    Likes Received:
    1,564
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    So has anybody else bit their lip and bought some LED bulbs?

    I got a dozen LED flood lights to replace some of the incandescents in my house. I'd tried CFLs, but they take forever to warm up to full brightness and don't dim well (or at all). I also got a case of philips "patented ugly" lobed bulbs to replace some CFLs in places I wanted a bulb that comes on quick.

    The spotlights I got are impressive. Made by "Feit" and claim to be replacements for 100w bulbs despite only making 1065 lumens (100W is 1400-1600, I think). LEDs make better use the light, though, since they're directional, and believe it or not, the bulbs really are as bright as claimed. Not bad for 17w, and they dim too. Best of all they have opaque diffusers and standard bodies--in the can they are indistinguishable from real bulbs. The only downside is the cost (~$25 per bulb) and the split-second delay before they light up. The philips bulbs are nice, too, and come on a little faster. Of course they're ugly beyond description and can't be put somewhere you can see them.

    I saw Lowes is advertising a 1400 lumen outdoor LED bulb, which I'm sure I could find a use for.
     
    Last edited: Jan 30, 2013
  8. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,592
    Likes Received:
    1,652
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
  9. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

    Messages:
    27,426
    Likes Received:
    7,602
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    NE PA
    

    I've been considering it, but LEDs are so goddamn ugly. And last time I checked they don't make a 3-way bulb. I had to shell out big bucks for a 3-way CFL, and it works well enough, but it's 10 times as expensive as a regular incandescent.
     
  10. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,146
    Likes Received:
    1,564
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Like I said, these BR40-factor can lights are completely indistinguishable appearance wise from regular bulbs. This is it right here: http://www.amazon.com/Feit-Electric-Conserv-Energy-Dimmable-BR40/dp/B009B0TETS

    [​IMG]

    Oh, and the impetus for getting the LEDs wasn't that I care so much about mother earth and all that, it's that I'm rearranging some of the can lights and wanted to make sure I could actually light my house in the future since brighter bulbs were banned by the "Dim Rooms Act"
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2013
  11. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,592
    Likes Received:
    1,652
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    Harvey, i have an LED in my floor lamps that you cannot tell it is not incandescent when it's on. I use them because I have my floor lamps on timers, they run about 7 hours per day. I like the house to have some light in every room without my participation, makes it seem a little more liveable.
     
  12. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

    Messages:
    27,426
    Likes Received:
    7,602
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    NE PA
    

    That isn't bad looking at all. Maybe I'll give them another try.


    That's interesting. Is it a ploy to ward off potential thieves or just your own personal quirk?
     
  13. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Likes Received:
    2,290
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    I wanted to run all my gallery track lighting as low-voltage and use LED bulbs. Unfortunately, I just had a really tough time getting my electrician and GC on the same page as me. They just didn't seem all that motivated to bring me product cut sheets or tell me how it could be done, leaving me to try to research it all on my own. In the end, between what seemed like a relatively scarce availability of these sorts of things, or at least my inability to find them online on my own, and the technical details that were beyond my understanding, we never figured it out. It still kind of chaps my ass, because I know it isn't that complicated.

    In the end, I finally just went with little MR16-based mini-spots at 120V, figuring that eventually the bulbs will catch up and just be plug and play in the existing fixtures. But haven't taken the plunge yet.

    For those of you who've done it, how is the light color?
     
  14. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,146
    Likes Received:
    1,564
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    They claim different light colors, 2700k being as low as it goes and supposed to be equivalent to an incandescent. In my experience it depends on the bulb. That's why I bought twelve at once.

    The Feit floodlights claim to be 2700k but are a bit whiter than the real bulbs they replaced. It's not dramatic, though. It works out well because I have a blue and cream oriental rug in the bedroom that looks much better under a whiter light.

    The Philips uglies are very close in color to incandescents. It's supposed to be a selling point along with the nondirectional light.

    A downside of the LEDs is that they don't get much warmer when they dim, unlike real bulbs. The really fancy ones have different colored LEDs, set up so the red ones dim less to get a change in color.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2013
  15. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

    Messages:
    14,658
    Likes Received:
    2,290
    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2007
    Location:
    Purseforum
    I could be misunderstanding some of this, but it is kind of weird how we enjoy warm light and judge light based on the realities of an old technology. LEDs and fluorescents are actually closer in temperature to that of direct sunlight, which should feel more natural to us, but we desire warmer light because it's what we've gotten accustomed to at night time thanks to the incandescent bulb.

    I wonder if in 30 years people will look at old photos and be like "wtf is with the yellowish light?"
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by