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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. cross22

    cross22 Senior member

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    Around 2007ish prices had gone up so much in a few years that most people couldn't afford to move into their homes if they already didn't own them. Many new buyers were getting interest only/subprime loans and buying homes that they couldn't afford. We are not anywhere near that now, so no, not really worried about that.

    Also source of the bolded nationally?
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2016
  2. jcman311

    jcman311 Senior member

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    Ill add that you can throw in garages to this. It was a sticking point to my wife that I wanted a two car garage to house our vehicles and we settled on a house with a very old 1.75 car garage. (Literally barely fits our 2 cars. We looked at tearing it down and starting new but we'd never recoup the cost in selling. Maybe if it was our forever house (or a 20 year house) but we plan on moving on shortly.

    Garages are expensive and their value is never well represented in home sales. Just like landscaping/outdoor improvements.
     
  3. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

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    Been doing a bunch of work on the house. Maybe 20 hrs pruning trees and bushes. Then our contractor said that behind the wallpaper in our bedroom was some kind of painted paper that would have to be scraped away, down to the bare plaster. I decided to do it myself.
    [​IMG]
    Took about eight hours to take down the wallpaper and backing paper, to wet and scrape the painted paper, and then to wipe down the layer of brown stuff (glue?) that was left in almost all the areas but the one exposed above. I'm fairly happy with the final results, but we'll see what the contractor thinks.
    [​IMG]

    Then I stripped paint off a door. First I coated it with Dumond Smart Strip, a zero VOC, biodegradable stripper that my brother recommended. After about eight hours, I saw that it had lifted a few layers of white paint. So I took that off with a putty knife. Didn't take a pic, unfortunately. The next day, the next few layers of paint had cracked and bubbled.
    [​IMG]
    This stuff wouldn't come off with a putty knife, So I used a small chisel and a wire brush.
    [​IMG]
    I think there's still a few more layers I could remove. Will probably need to give it another coat of the Smart Strip stuff. Our painter said the problem with using a chemical paint remover is that you need to go all the way down to the wood, or new paint probably won't adhere well.

    Since this is Styleforum, here's a pic of the shell Rider boots I was wearing. They'll clean up like they didn't go through such abuse.
    [​IMG]
     
    6 people like this.
  4. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    Man I gotta hand it to you. That is a lotta work for a door. I would of pulled it off, removed the hardware, hit it hard with an orbital sander,primed and repainted. I kinda like that heavy encapsulated look in older houses also I'm lazy when it comes to prep.
    ,
     
  5. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

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    Thanks N, but really I'm lazy too, which is why I didn't remove the hardware. Plus, the hinges were caked w/ paint. But the real reason is probably that I don't own an orbital sander. A dremel tool is about as fancy as I get.

    Good point about the caked/encapsualted look. I thought about doing nothing to them, but our painters have already spent several days scraping the trim, so I thought that paint-caked doors wouldn't match the trim. The head painter recommended replacing the doors or doing nothing to them. But our contractor thinks they're original to the house, so I figured I might as well spend some time restoring them. A pic of the trim, that I don't think I've posted:
    [​IMG]
    You can see that they got down to the tan color, which is where the stripper got to with almost no effort. But with just plain scraping, their tan is stable, whereas mine was bubbling and needed to be removed with perhaps about as much effort as their scraping. Not sure which is best, but I'm having fun.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2016
    1 person likes this.
  6. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Looks nice. I really enjoy the moldings in older houses, they really put some effort in.

    I think your contractor is right, those doors will be hard to replace with something comparable even though they were somewhat basic at the time of manufacture. You can find someone who will build comparable doors but it will be somewhat expensive by comparison to even very good doors at most places.
     
    2 people like this.
  7. gnatty8

    gnatty8 Senior member

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    Not in Atlanta, GA
    

    Your wife is a very, very wise lady.. Hold on to that one..



    Well, considering housing prices are basically back where they were pre-crisis, and it's barely been 8 years since a correction, I'd be nervous about buying, particularly if you can't commit to your property for at least 10 years.
     
  8. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Thanks and that's the plan. I look at some friends with spend-a-holic wives and know they'll never retire.
     
  9. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Piob, what are you using for a NAS?
     
  10. MrGimpy

    MrGimpy Senior member

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    Has anyone done research on microwave ovens lately? Our Panasonic gave up the ghost today. I never liked it and want something better.

    One catch: our other appliances are black with glass facades. I think this limits our options. We could do either built-in or countertop with a mounting kit.
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2016
  11. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    Can't remember the exact model but Synology and I loaded it up with four, two TB Western Digital Red NAS discs. Easy to set up, easy to use, data protected very well. Also comes with USB ports you can plug in various things like an iPod dock, an external disc (I have a couple other WD 1 TB externals connected).
     
  12. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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  13. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

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    Last night I had a nightmare about what was beneath the floor of that small, outdoors closet, the one that had the rotten door frame. In my nightmare it was full of termites, spiders, and rats. First, I ripped up the vinyl surface:
    [​IMG]

    That revealed rotten plywood flooring. Our contractor warned me that there might be a deep hole under the floor, possibly even an old well, so to rip off the vinyl, I spread out my legs and arms like Spiderman, trying not to step on the rotting plywood.
    [​IMG]

    But when the plywood was gone, you could see that beneath that and the rotting 2x4 frame was concrete. No termites or rats, but quite a few spiders and, strangely, even more earthworms.
    [​IMG]

    Nice and clean after the rotten wood (spiders and earthworms) had been shoveled and swept up:
    [​IMG]

    Almost filled two demo bags with the debris:
    [​IMG]
    I'm not sure what we'll do with the little room. But I'm thinking we may just leave the floor concrete, since it'll be used for gardening tools and supplies.

    The contractor and his workers were busy today, ripping out one kitchen wall. We knew it concealed a chimney for a small fireplace, but it also has the original vent pipe for a stove, as well as smaller pipes for the carbide lamps.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 2, 2016
    5 people like this.
  14. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    @emptym I have a stove vent like that in my kitchen wall. It is asbestos, not a huge deal but be sure to treat accordingly
     
  15. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

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    Shit. Thanks. Our contractor once told me that since the house is over 100 yrs old, he assumes everything in it has asbestos and/or lead. But I'll let him know. They keep everything really clean.

    The wall had two sheets of half-inch drywall, then the original laths and a half-inch of plaster -- I guess to insulate the kitchen from the fireplace and heating duct.
     
  16. MrG

    MrG Senior member

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    The leaky dishwasher is a good example. It's also harder to clean up, which is a problem given the nature of what goes on in the kitchen, and it's exacerbated by the fact that I'm kind of a messy cook and have small children who are prone to spills. I feel like I spend a lot more time cleaning every time there's a spill than I would with another flooring type because I have to do stuff like clean in the grooves.

    Also, I worry a lot about durability. The kitchen is pretty high traffic, which ages the wood faster, and it seems like every dropped fork, cup, etc. leaves a new mark in my floor.

    That all said, I didn't realize when I made that post that you'd had wood in the kitchen before (hehe), and it sounds like it's still the best option, so my gripes are likely moot for you. Unfortunately, I'm guessing they will be for me, too, because my floor plan kind rules out having the kitchen floor finished in something different from the family room (though I've seriously considered adding a feature to mitigate that when the time comes).
     
  17. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    I had crappy looking linoleum in my kitchen when I moved in so I threw down some "pergo"thinking I would replace it a couple years down the road.20 years, washing machine floods,on the path to the back door,three kids and countless animals later it still looks brand new[​IMG]
     
  18. emptym

    emptym Senior member Moderator

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    ^Nice. My parents have 20 or 30-something yr old linoleum that looks virtually new.

    @MrG, yeah wear and water are good concerns. My brother suggests putting in a water sensor that automatically shuts off water to the dishwasher and sink.
     
  19. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Looks good, nice work clearing out that mess and I think you are also right to leave it concrete. This may be a hair-brained idea, but bringing it up to the level with the other flooring?

    Making headway with the HVAC, paid a fellow to patch it up and keep things cool until Sep when I can get a rebate on a new system with a contractor who uses Trane equip. Neighbor just used him and said it was fantastic, great pricing as well.

    My neighbor is a pretty tough negotiator so I'm simply asking for the same pricing plus rebate :)
     
  20. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    I love that old school angle bracing and lath and plaster.
     

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