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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    Installing a subway tile backsplash in the kitchen. Should I do a backerboard, some kind of thin membrane, or none of the above?
     
  2. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

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    I like concrete backerboard. More effort, but there won't be cracking or moisture issues.
     
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  3. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    That's the way I'm leaning. Plus it should help make sure good adhesion of the tile. The downside is that it is another ~1/4" sticking out from the wall, which may mean I need to reposition my undercabinet lights. No big deal though.
     
  4. Numbernine

    Numbernine Well-Known Member

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    I used the tile adhesive sheets in my kitchen been fine for @ 5 years . Two hints if you go with them surface prep is very important ,sand with coarse paper and wipe with a good solvent .I used acetone. These things have a shelf life be sure to check the date HD will leave old crap on the shelf[​IMG]
     
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  5. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    Do you mean something like this: http://www.homedepot.com/p/Custom-B...at-10-sq-ft-Tile-Setting-Mat-SM10R1/202828989
     
  6. Numbernine

    Numbernine Well-Known Member

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  7. 1wb

    1wb Well-Known Member

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    No, if you are using Hardibacker, you would be demo-ing/cutting out the underlying drywall and screwing the hardibacker to the wall studs, not installing it over the drywall. In fact, cement backerboard is slightly thinner than drywall, 3/8 rather than 1/2.

    It is really not necessary to do this for a backsplash, IMO. Just mortar and install tile right over the drywall.

    The purpose of cement backer is not better adhesion or even water resistance, but rather to prevent expansion/contraction movement under the tile and thus cracking.

    Is there an existing countertop backsplash? If so, are you going to remove it first?
     
  8. RedLantern

    RedLantern Well-Known Member

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    Two weeks from today I will be knee deep in kitchen rubble (doing the demo for my kitchen remodel). But today I got to take out all the sink drain in my bathroom and make a wire hook to fish a clog of biblical proportions out of my drain line. Always nice to be able to do that kind of thing yourself instead of calling somebody.
     
  9. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    No. It was just painted drywall, and we replaced the countertop which was laminate with the 1" backsplash.
     
  10. 1wb

    1wb Well-Known Member

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    Whatever you do, don't start any tile work without spending some time reading up on all the expertise available from the John Bridge site - good luck!

    I do think the pro approach would be to remove an existing granite (or whatever) backsplash sits on your countertop and tile the backsplash right down to the counter surface.
     
  11. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

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    Right. My comment about moisture was more about having a substrate that offers no place for mold to get a foothold.
     
  12. SeaJen

    SeaJen Well-Known Member

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    In a kitchen there is no advantage to using hardiboard or cement board if the drywall is already there, and you will just add time and expense.
    In a bathroom it makes sense because it doesn't mold, or at least, not as easily. Neither does it deteriorate in moist conditions. But even here ito is only necessary around the tub or showroom enclosure. Tiling the walls of a bathroom can be done straight on the drywall.
     
  13. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Well-Known Member

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    Where is your commitment, SeaJen?! :)
     
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  14. brokencycle

    brokencycle Well-Known Member

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    Thanks guys. Appreciate the feedback! Another question for you. Any of you have experience with either Behr or other deck restoration paint? It allegedly grips better than normal paint, helps preserve the wood, and often has a texture to it. Last summer I tried regular deck paint, and it started to flak off in less than 6 months. The deck is probably 10-15 years old and is standard pressure treated wood which has always been painted. I think stain won't look good on it.

    Before I spend 2x per gallon on paint, I figure I'd ask for any experience with it.
     
  15. flvinny521

    flvinny521 Well-Known Member

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    Palm Beach, FL
    My wife and I are weighing the pros and cons of selling our current home vs. staying and investing in some upgrades. We live in a small neighborhood of only 80-something homes. It's in an area that had been mainly agricultural in the past, but is very near to a desirable residential area, and is currently undergoing a lot of construction. We feel that eventually, our area will be like an "extension" of the other, more established town, but it's not there yet. The point of the backstory is that we had our home built by the developer of this community, and there aren't tons of comps at this time other than our own neighborhood. There are two other communities directly north and south of ours, but it seems unlikely that an appraiser would choose homes there as a comp over those in more direct competition.

    A few months ago, a neighbor in a larger home than mine sold his property for considerably (20-25%) less than what we would have considered market value. His sales price was around the price of the home we built. We suspect that he sold to a family member or close friend and maybe took some cash on the side, or worked out some sort of "alternative" arrangement with them. As a result, it's possible (maybe likely) that our home would end up appraising for less than a fair price based on the south Florida market. Is there anything we could do proactively to reduce the impact this sale will have on us, other than just waiting it out? Our neighborhood doesn't have much activity, so we're concerned that we could be waiting a while.
     
  16. jbarwick

    jbarwick Well-Known Member

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    It is now a comp and you can't do much about it. Not all homes go up in value and in some cases people may sell their home for less in the case of a divorce or an urgent need to move. Real estate is a weird purchase where others actions affect yours.
     
    1 person likes this.
  17. flvinny521

    flvinny521 Well-Known Member

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    That's understandable, but the circumstances immediately before and after lead me to the conclusion that there was something else at work here. For example, both my wife and I recall seeing the vehicles of the current owner parking at the home overnight for the couple of weeks prior to the sale, among other things.

    I'm sure in the long run we'll be perfectly happy in our current home for the long haul, but it would be really nice to have the "extras" that we could afford by selling and moving. This is our second home (first with kids) and I think we finally have a better grip on our needs and wants, as well as a bit more income. Oh well, somebody once said "you can't always get what you want."
     
  18. texas_jack

    texas_jack Well-Known Member

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    Could be worse. The neighbor at our other place is letting it go into foreclosure.
     
  19. MrG

    MrG Well-Known Member

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    Yeah, the comps are going up give you trouble. When we bought our house, the dearth of comps actually worked in our favor. The appraiser had to go pretty far back to find enough to do the appraisal, which, in our market, meant missing a fair bit of value growth. It was great for us because it put the seller in a bind, but it certainly wasn't what they wanted (which is where you are now).

    That said, you can appeal an appraisal, so you could always make your case regarding the house that sold cheap, but you'd still have to be able to identify enough comparable sales to justify whatever price you think is fair market. That last bit might be the insurmountable part for you, since you said there are very few sales in your area.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2016
  20. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

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    You have to remind the appraiser that the value of residential real estate is whatever price a willing seller and a willing buyer come together at. There's no DCF of rents, etc. with residential real estate. It truly is whatever two parties are willing to do business at.
     

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