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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Break a leg, kid.

    lefty
     
  2. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Congrats on the cabin, looks pretty awesome, I like the timber frame posts and such.

    Conne,

    I am using Benjamin Moore super white on the walls in eggshell and semi gloss for the trim. I used a color called nimbus, which is a light grey, for the ceiling.

    I have used regal, but decided to use natura, awesome stuff and doesn't really smell much at all. We cracked the windows at night after I painted, but even then only my wife noticed the smell.

    Fair warning on eggshell, your drywall prep needs to be very well done or you will see everything.
     
  3. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    I painted the ceiling and closet white yesterday and noticed a couple ceiling spots that I need to fix. The previous ceiling color must have been a shade of gray as I walked around the room with a bright lamp and did not notice those imperfections. I will look again today with some better daylight but my other corrections blended in fine. My only concern on the walls are some slight cracks I had to fill in which I have not dealt with before. Everything else on the walls was filling in small holes or scraping off build up that the previous painters left.

    Also congrats on the cabin Lefty! Looks like it will be a lot of fun. My wife would never go for a cabin.
     
  4. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    If the cracks return, carve them out, then use drywall compound and tape.

    I had a fix a couple cracks in the drywall around my place, they cracked because the builder didn't tape the seam...oddly enough. They taped all of them except a handful of short seams...which all cracked.

    I like drywall compound rather than spackle for anything that needs a heavier fill and feathering out.
     
  5. Marc Voorhees

    Marc Voorhees Senior member

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    Has anyone here poured their own cement pad? I have dug out, I will add and compact a base, but I am trying to Dave big money on the finishing.

    Was quoted around 4k to pour the 600sqft pad 7.75 cuyds. I can get cement delivered direct for about 1100, but they wont finish it or help finish it. So I might give it a go? Any thoughts? Any tips?

    Thanks!
     
  6. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    That sounds crazy high. I had my driveway, which was ~1200 square ft for $5500. It was just a basic finishing, but they tore out the old blacktop driveway and poured for that price.
     
  7. john_sf

    john_sf Well-Known Member

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    I think you could probably do that yourself - 600sf isn't that large and it's not rocket science ...

    If you're already getting the compactor, I would be sure to compact the grade first, unless it was undisturbed and is rock solid. Then compact the road base that you put underneath the concrete.

    You do need steel, and that's the tricky part - if you don't steel reinforce it with rebar, it's going to crack and it will be much, much weaker. You can look at pictures and guides on the net, but I would think an 18" grid across the entire thing would be fine if no heavy trucks/equipment will ever use it, and you need to raise the rebar up with these little plastic "chairs" so that it ends up in the *middle* of the concrete, not just sitting on the bottom.

    The final piece is the expansion joints - you know, the cracks in the sidewalk every 3-4 feet ... if the pad is 20x30, I would think a simple tic tac toe grid of joints - so 10' x 7', give or take, for each square in the tic-tac-toe board. I don't know how to trowel joints, so if I was doing it myself, I would probably cut joints with a circular saw and a diamond blade - you'll need to read up about that. Cut joints are not as good as troweled joints, though, and that's what you hire someone for.

    If this is just a 4" thick pad for patio/deck/whatever, I would do it myself and this is a good direction to go. if this is a garage/workshop or anything that will see real vehicle use (parking, etc.) I would pay someone to really do things right (hand troweled joints, 12" x 12" rebar, 6 sack mix, etc.)

    Oh, and remember - the longer the concrete takes to dry (cure) the stronger it is - so plan to "water" it every 4 hours or so for the first few days and it will cure very slowly and be stronger.
     
    2 people like this.
  8. Marc Voorhees

    Marc Voorhees Senior member

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    Hi john, some crazy good advice there.

    Do, let me just chat about a few things. This will essentially be a basement floor (interior to a barn building)at grade. Iam going with a 3500# mix 4in pour with 4in base below compacted every 2 in.

    Having talked with contractor, they thought that the rebar base would be major overkill since this will essentially be a shop floor. They suggested going with a mesh interlay, cheaper and much easier. Do you have any experience?
    With regards to the expansion joints, I would prefer cut because I will be rolling tools around and I do t want things slamming into cracks or getting stuck. But since the pad is inside the insulated envelope of the building, does it need expansion joints? I can't remember if my basement floors had then back when I had a contractor poured basement.

    Tha k you so much for the advice!!
     
  9. flvinny521

    flvinny521 Senior member

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    Palm Beach, FL

    Do you have any pics of an area where all three colors are visible? This is similar to the colors I'm suggesting to the wife for our home.
     
  10. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I can take some pics later on.

    Anyone have suggestions on good screw-in type LEDs. I thought I had it covered, but I have one in regular use (8 hours/day) and it died after a few months, second attempt on that one as well to eliminate the possibility of a bad batch, both died in similar time frames.
     
  11. flvinny521

    flvinny521 Senior member

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    Might as well throw this line out here, as well. I recently posted a question on AVS Forums regarding some work I'd like to do to my living room television wall. Anybody have advice?

    This is a picture of the "media wall" in my living room. After I moved in, I quickly slapped my old Polk speakers on mounts, with plans to modernize the look later on by replacing with in-wall speakers and running the wires properly behind the wall. I am aware that in-walls aren't the greatest for sound quality, but this will only be our primary viewing area until work begins on the dedicated theater upstairs in a few years. I'm willing to live with it until then.

    So, now the time has come. I was thinking that instead of simply installing the speakers into the wall itself, I'd somehow frame out a panel or facade wall a few inches away from the drywall. This would (in my opinion) improve the appearance of the wall by giving it a modern touch, and also allow me to run the wires between the drywall and the panels, which might be easier to replace than if they were actually in the wall.

    I am a complete beginner to this, and would appreciate any advice or links you can share that might assist with this project. As you can see, there is a light switch near the left speaker that needs to be moved to the other side of the doorway, and also an outlet behind the current console table that would need to be extended out into the panel wall. I will likely hire an electrician for those jobs since I have no electrical background whatsoever, unless there are no-brainer DIY kits for either of those items. But really, is there such thing as a no-brainer when it comes to electrical?

    Here are a few samples of styles that my wife picked out. I am partial to the first one with the large vertical wood slabs. I know there are also pre-assembled panels, which I am sure would save a lot of time and labor, but can these easily be cut or otherwise modified to mount the TV and speakers?

    http://decoholic.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/04/TV-wall-decor-ideas-8.jpg
    http://studio1202.com.br/wp-content/uploads/2015/12/rack-sala-televisão-decoração-9.jpg
    https://static.4nets.sk/photo/57/309957/album/2221244_720.jpg
    http://www.theuncommonlaw.ca/uploads/wp-images/IMG_0900-2-950x633.jpg
     
  12. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    Had to search for the post, now I'm on my laptop. It was this cabin, so not the same one.
    This might be up your alley. http://www.amazon.com/Cabin-Porn-Inspiration-Quiet-Somewhere/dp/0316378216/
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
  13. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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  14. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Day 3 of painting is in the books. I've never painted a ceiling before but it turned out well. The closest was not looking good with the wet paint but once it dried it turned out better than expected. Today was the walls with tomorrow being 2nd coat and touch up. I did not tape and bought one of those plastic straight edge type things to help but I ditched that early on. I ended up just free handing the ceiling and trim and my lines look really good. Again I was surprised with myself and it looks better than the painters we have used in the past. I may go back and touch up some of their lines when I am done if my wife doesn't find any other projects before then.

    While taking my time today I listened to the "Serial" podcast which is very interesting. I am almost done and will finish tomorrow. It was much more enjoyable than music the previous 2 days.

    Am I slow? Yes. But I don't have a deadline other than April and the curtains and other baby furniture will not be in until the middle of the month.
     
  15. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Glad to see you enjoy, I enjoy painting as well.

    The time consumed is not important, IMO, since you will be looking at your work for quite some time in the months ahead.

    I built the bed in my son's room and sometimes when feeding I will look at the joinery (I am weird, I know).

    If I look at the walls I just think of how much I would like to paint them.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
  16. Numbernine

    Numbernine Senior member

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    Where the palm tree meets the pine
    I hired this druggy painter a few years ago to paint my house ,needless to say I ended doing most of the work but the guy really knew his stuff . He taught me how to load a brush and lay an edge . All the stuff I used to dread,like trim and cut-in, I actually enjoy now
     
  17. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    God I loath painting. Maybe Endglade's druggy could teach a master class and change my mind.
     
    Last edited: Jan 2, 2016
  18. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    Nice cabin Lefty. Those composting privies actually work pretty well and are simple as hell which is always a nice feature in the sticks. You need a dog for that porch.
     
  19. john_sf

    john_sf Well-Known Member

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    You have to do the rebar. That's the only way. I wouldn't even do a BBQ grill pad without rebar. It's more complicated and epensive, but it's The Right Way and the pad will crack without it. Again, remember that it has to be in the middle (in your case, 2" from the bottom) to work properly. The little props are called "chairs".

    I think cut joints will be just fine. If you can get them perfectly straight, they look very nice as well. Practice on some other slab somewhere first :) Regardless of temperature or climate, the ground can move - or you can move things around on top of the slab - and the slab *will* crack. There's no way around it. WIth the joints, the slab cracks *along the joint* which is the whole point.

    May I suggest garagejournal.com as a good forum for things like this ? Lots of great knowledge there and very friendly folks.
     
  20. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    I have had good luck with Phillips. Cheap, off brand LEDs on Amazon have been hit or miss. About 1/3 or so fail within the first year, and it is such a pain to get a warranty replacement, it just isn't worth it. The big box stores are selling Cree and Phillips at pretty good prices these days.
     
    1 person likes this.

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