The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    This is different, as most homes look the same due to interior magazines only featuring certain types of homes, who all have the same pieces (advertising money), which has lead to everyone owning the exact same shit, because it's regarded as great taste, even people who are into interior design have them and talk about them being something special.

    The pictures I have seen of SB house looks nothing like the homes, I've seen with midcentury furniture around here.
     
  2. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    Some really nice home interiors:
    http://habituallychic.luxury/2014/0...s=771773029552934&fb_action_types=og.comments

    I might be historically nearsighted but isn't part of this problem with mid century boom is that the last 50 years of furniture design failed to distinguish itself ? I appreciate 20 C design movements: Art Nouveau, Art Deco and then Mid-Century European design (including N. Europe, Italy, France, Brazil) , the other smaller and local periods are also distinct and appreciable Bauhaus and Biedermeier , but then it all went downhill. IMHO, last 40 years of 20C and beginning of 21C failed to produce distinct style, thus decorators are reaching for mid-century and beyond. No?
     
  3. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    Not really no, if you look at B+B italia, Roche Bobois, Jasper Morrison, Established & Sons, Inch, Autobahn, E15, Tacchini etc. etc. etc. they all differ a lot from MCM.

    The main issue is the media and retailers they have very good agreements with the big MCM brands, who have lived very well of doing absolutely nothing since the mid sixties and it's only within the last couple years brands like Fritz Hansen has released new designs from Jaime Hayon etc.

    Having worked with furniture I know how difficult it is for unknown/new brands to get any press coverage, because of the above, I've even experienced magazines and shop decline designs as being bad, when sold from a new/unknown brand and raving over it, when it was sold to a large well known german brand.

    Another issue, is that people want something the neighbor knows what is and costs, so they can feel better about themselve knowing that, the neighbors knows that they have spend $10.000 on a chair, there isn't the same "prestige" in unknown designers.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  4. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    I came close to buying an art deco club chair once or twice a decade or so ago. Glad I didn't. But my father had a fantastic battered old leather chesterfield for decades and sold it when he downsized a few years ago. It was too big for the place I had at the time sadly, so I had to watch it go. I'd love to have that particular sofa now, but I've never really been tempted to buy another chesterfield.

    I think you can only judge these things on a case by case basis. Some places you go in and can see the hands of a professional decorator all over it and it just doesn't sit quite right, others you can just tell this is someone's personal taste or hobby. Personally I've always thought it best (certainly safest) to decorate a place more or less according to the age and style of the building. It would be virtually impossible for mid century danish furniture to be in poor taste in a mid century apartment in Denmark.

    Shit did I just describe "honest living"?
     
  5. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    There are many great contemporary pieces out there now, but I wouldn't turn away from the classics just for the sake of their popularity. The design magazine and decorator crowd will pick a new target soon enough.

    It won't be long before they're flogging Morris chairs again and dark stained white oak is popular.

    The 'honest living' bit can be taken to far, but in a basic way it's accurate.

    I am also a hypocrite because there are some pieces I dislike because they're over specified.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  6. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    Respectfully disagree, I have seen 19 C rooms meshing fantsatically with modern or MCM [​IMG]

    On a second point of MC apartments meshing well with MC furniture, yeaa I see it everywhere here. I live in one of these Apt. with nothing but glass walls and terraces running the lenght of the building on both sides. The decor inside is predominantly MCM becasue it is so available here or people inherited it and did not trash it yet. IMHO, these interiors are so bland, boring , me too MCM that it makes my teeth hurt. Only mix , however eclectic looks like a living space , MCM inside MCM looks like a requiem for a dream. Just look at that Hotel interiors a few posts back , I feel like someone's soul died in those rooms. :D
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  7. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    Oh certainly can be done well, just wouldn't try it myself (I bet it's harder than it looks). Also a lot of modern stuff is long and low, and a lot of 19th C rooms are tall and narrow (in london at least) and both furniture and room can come off worse for the juxtaposition. The example you posted works in part because it's a nice big room.

    And yes, quite agree on eclecticism. Was by no means advocating a totalitarian approach. My house is 18th C and I have a sort of base of furniture, art etc from that period, but with plenty of stuff from the intervening couple of centuries (and some earlier) added on top.
     
  8. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    Yes, yes that is the way to do it. Modern nomadic life-style is pratially to blame ,as many folks don't live long enough in one place to collect the home interior ,so they rush to one store and Whamm-m, get MCMed.

    18C house, lucky you. Have you done renovations to it, any secret rooms or unreported treasures discovered?

    Myself, I only found small storage space in one of the walls. It was painted over gazillion times and empty inside , but boy was it exsiting to find small keyhole in the wall ....:)

    P.S. Regarding tall but narrow rooms, I would guess it is a result of later remodelling and partitioning of the rooms.
     
  9. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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  10. E TF

    E TF Senior member

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    The interior had been subjected to a pretty thorough "modernisation" by the previous owners: we've spent the last couple of years largely undoing what they did, trying to give it back the character of an old house. A bit of a labour of love. Did have a similar moment to you when we pulled up some carpet and discovered a hatch into a void between floors. No treasure inside alas.

    I'm thinking of the typical georgian/victorian london terrace house when I talk about tall narrow rooms - horizontal space was (still is) at a premium so rooms were not that large in footprint, but they were generous with the ceiling heights, 10-12ft or more (nice big sash windows too). True that they have often been made even more so by later remodelling - a lot have been chopped up into apartments and new rooms squeezed in.
     
  11. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

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  12. gomestar

    gomestar Super Yelper

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    B&B Italia is just rich housewife shit
     
  13. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Finn I certainly respect your opinion, but to me that place looks like they bought the entire thing out of a catalog in an afternoon with their decorator. IMO a good mix of contemporary and modern should involve some antiques and pieces from a multitude of sub categories of modern.

    ETF, I love 18c stuff, but it's an impossible target to hit in America unless you are fully capable of spending a fortune at Christies and Sotheby's. Quite literally you have a better chance at furnishing your house in Ruhlmann and spending less than you would furnishing it in 18c. In fact you probably could arrive at auction with money to spend and still spend a great deal of time curating furnishings for an 18c house. Not to mention finding the rare and obscure person who can actually restore 18c furniture and do so correctly.

    18c Interiors, In America, were sparse to begin with because everything was made by cabinet shops and chair makers, so at the time the equivalent would be like attempting to furnish your place in Nakashima in his mid career. Yes, it was doable for some, but most would end up with just the major pieces. Considering how much is left on the market after 250~ years and you are left with a very small pool to draw from.

    Then we have 19c, which while there are some fantastic makers of the period making 18c period works, the great majority was schlock and being pumped out by factories to fill victorian houses in which the owners were looking to display wealth by way of excess. Victorians, while I do enjoy them, were the McMansions of their day. Craftsman is the stand out from that period, certainly out of favor at the moment in design magazines, and probably much to the satisfaction of those who collect it.

    There is a ton of great contemporary work; Jasper Morrison, Thomas Bo Kastholm, Tadao Ando, Luciano Bertoncini, Craig Bassam, Alfred Homann, ect.
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2014
  14. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    Oh , I get it now, they call it railroad apartment or townhouse in US. A lot of premium NYC real estate has been built like that.
     
  15. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    It isn't that I don't like these. I mean, I have so much Jasper Morrison shit it is kind of embarrassing, but this list is basically one of contemporary designers doing things to be MCM/DWR friendly, and it kind of misses out on different uses of materials, technologies etc.
     

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