Dismiss Notice

STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

Tags:
  1. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,675
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    My house is very uneven in temperature, so I'm preparing to cover the attic in reflective foil, then cover that in plywood. It's already insulated, but this should help from what I understand. Ultimately I'd like to move any long term storage into the attic (if not the trash). Will allow for better use of 1/2 the basement that is currently unfinished.
     


  2. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

    Messages:
    11,660
    Likes Received:
    1,752
    Joined:
    Apr 18, 2008
    Does that reflective foil stuff actually work? I sold my old table saw to a guy who claimed to be the regional distributor for one of the makers of it--and he came off as a damned nut.
     


  3. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,675
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    It works for reflecting heat, doesn't do much to ward off aliens however.


    I'll let you know if it works for me, two positive results from friends that I asked. They did it with no other changes, to my knowledge.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2012


  4. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,277
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    Good thread. Never knew it was here.



    Going to replace my bathroom floor downstairs with wood. Its a full bath, but almost never gets used other than a guest showering. I have some leftover barnwood flooring from an addition, looks great treated with tung oil. Resists water anyway.




    Isn't there a restrictor at the water main coming into the house? Most houses have one.




    Pretty stupid. Its satisfying work. Did an addition 2 years ago and managed the entire thing. Was getting estimates of 120k for the job, I brought it in a few pennies above 60k. Hired every contractor myself, ordered every material too. These guys order tons of shit you don't need.

    I wired all the electrical myself, just hired a guy to do the work on the main box.

    Best thing I have done to my house is put in a wood stove. Love that thing.
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2012


  5. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

    Messages:
    12,675
    Likes Received:
    1,719
    Joined:
    Jan 3, 2008
    Location:
    Princeton, NJ
    I agree, it can save you quite a bit. I do it because I enjoy it
     
    Last edited: Dec 12, 2012


  6. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,277
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    Not just that. I don't like weirdos traipsing thru my house and I dont like the risk of them over-diagnosing problems. In this respect the net is a great thing. Recently I was getting water on the floor from my fridge, went to the net and typed the symptoms and found a few step by step vids that were my exact problem.
     


  7. MrG

    MrG Senior member

    Messages:
    12,191
    Likes Received:
    4,345
    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Location:
    The Medicine Spring
    Speaking, of soliciting help from the internet, I'll ask you guys for your opinion.

    I just found a wet spot on my downstairs ceiling. It's about 18" by 3-4". It's not soaked or bulging - the spot is firm to the touch but definitely dark and feels damp/cold. It's not under any type of plumbing fixture, so I'm guessing it's a leaky pipe, rather than a leaky fixture. I checked the room above the wet spot, and there's no evidence of any dampness anywhere in there, so my best guess is that it's coming from between the floors. All of this being the case, what sort of repairman would you call in this situation? I'm leaning toward a handyman, since it'll almost certainly require cutting into the drywall, but I'm thinking it might not be a bad idea to just go for a plumber.

    Thoughts?
     


  8. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,277
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    Considering both a plumber or handyman are going to have to cut the drywall, why don't you do the cut and see what the problem is? You might very well be able to fix it and hire the handyman to clean up the job.

    I think its always better to go into a problem informed.
     


  9. MrG

    MrG Senior member

    Messages:
    12,191
    Likes Received:
    4,345
    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Location:
    The Medicine Spring
    

    I'm seriously considering it, but, dammit, this isn't what I wanted to be doing with my Wednesday!
     


  10. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,277
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    Then rent homey

    Seriously, 10 mins max to make that hole and peek
     


  11. MrG

    MrG Senior member

    Messages:
    12,191
    Likes Received:
    4,345
    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Location:
    The Medicine Spring
    

    Believe me, I often wish I were still a renter!

    I cut a couple-inch hole right in the middle of the stain. The drywall was a little damp, but it's not particularly wet, and there's no visible leak. I feel a little better about waiting until morning.
     


  12. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,277
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    Is there a pipe in that spot?
     


  13. MrG

    MrG Senior member

    Messages:
    12,191
    Likes Received:
    4,345
    Joined:
    May 25, 2008
    Location:
    The Medicine Spring
    

    The hole is pretty small, so I can't see much, but there's not one where I cut.
     


  14. zalb916

    zalb916 Senior member

    Messages:
    4,627
    Likes Received:
    529
    Joined:
    Dec 26, 2006
    

    I had the exact same problem. Wet spot on my downstairs ceiling. Not big. Not soaked or bulging. A little damp and cold. It was not under a bathroom, and I didn't think there were pipes nearby. No signs of any issues to the floor directly above. I was clueless about where it was coming from.

    Cut open the ceiling and found tubing installed in the ceiling. It was used to vent hot air from my dryer out the roof. It just snakes its way through the house. The tubing had become a little dislodged on the roof and was taking in just a little bit of rain water that wound up slowly dripping at some point in the tubing above the wet spot in the ceiling. Sealed up the vent issue on the roof and just fixed the small piece of drywall on the ceiling. Good to go.

    I'd check your roof and see if you've got anything up there, like an AC or some other vent, that maybe is a little loose and allowing some water in.
     


  15. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

    Messages:
    16,277
    Likes Received:
    1,051
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2008
    Location:
    VA
    

    You need a hole you can really see in there with. Like 3 or 4" around. Flashlight. If you have to fix it, it makes no difference if its small or larger.

    No evidence at all?
     


Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by