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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

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  1. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    What was the consensus of under the cabinet lighting for the kitchen? Our previous house had these little disc type spotlight things that were hardwired and we are thinking about them for the new house as well. Would be LED and in the 3000K range as I like that light output a lot. Better to do the little spotlights or a bar type setup?
     


  2. i10casual

    i10casual Senior member

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    I think so. I would want the less hot LED under the cabinet and also over me if I was using the counter.
     


  3. otc

    otc Senior member

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    All comes down to whether or not you can see.

    In my current place, The kitchen was lit by a single fixture (3-globe overhead fixture in the center of the room) and thus all of the light gets blocked by shadow when standing in front of certain areas. So I installed a hood with built-in lighting over the stove, and some Ikea LED strips over the sink/counter on the other side. Nice bit of light to fill in what my body blocked.

    The cheaper ikea light strips were nice (the more expensive ones with adjustable color have too high of a color temp in their whites)...and dirt cheap. To do a full install with them, you gotta buy multiple sets and make your own extension wires (since you don't want them to each have a separate power plug and switch).
     


  4. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    After browsing houzz for a while I found that I like the look that a strip of LEDs provides more than spot lights. Also thinking of lights on top of the cabinets as ours do not reach the ceiling but that may be a little overboard. Our current setup in the square kitchen is 4 larger recessed lights and 2 spot lights over the sink. Just thinking over ideas now...
     


  5. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    I was reading an install article on under counter LEDs a few weeks ago. They have a kit where you open up an existing outlet along the counter, put in a bigger box with both an outlet and switch, and drill a hole up under the cabinets out of sight where the wire will come out for the LED strips. Looks great and not hard to do.
     


  6. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    You really don't need a kit for that. You can buy combination switches (no special box needed) for a few dollars. Or you can buy an "old work" box and an ordinary light switch. Or you can put an outlet in the cabinet.

    Why anybody would plug in cabinet lights is a mystery to me.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 19, 2014


  7. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    The kit included all the LED goodies too.
     


  8. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    I would connect this to the light switch for the over the sink lights. After reading up on this it seems pretty straight forward for an install with the LED strips or the actual fixtures. Thinking the fixtures may be a little too bulky when a strip can work in its place.
     


  9. joelscott7

    joelscott7 Senior member

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    Just moved into our first house last night. So many headaches already, but much more room that the condo. We have had a contractor do a terrible job building a closet and had to kick him out. Our flooring guys called the day they were to start to tell us they were too busy to do our house, so we found someone else, but they didn`t finish until 9pm the night we had moved in.

    Now our AC is leaking water onto the basement floor... I have been trying to fix it with aluminum tape, anyone have any recommendations on how to best seal it, or should I just call in a pro?
     


  10. Joffrey

    Joffrey Senior member

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  11. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Water coming from the AC is normal. You don't want to stop it from getting out of the evaporator; you want it to drain. There should be a drain somewhere. Find it and unplug it.
     


  12. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Congrats on home ownership! Never heard of an A/C inside of the house.
     


  13. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    A "split" A/C (usually anything bigger than a window unit) has two major parts. The condenser/compressor with the fan is outside. There are refrigerant lines that go from it to the evaporator, which is inside, wherever the air handler is -- usually in the attic or in a closet in the conditioned space. Or the basement, I guess, but we don't have those around here.

    Edit: picture of an evaporator coil

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 25, 2014


  14. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    My 2 cents worth, Heat Exchange Pump is way way way more effeicient , smaller, quieter , does not require huge ugly ducts inside your rooms and can heat your place up as well as cool it. And boy do they cool fast, what took my central AC 45 minutes is accoplished in 10min. by the heat pump.
     


  15. otc

    otc Senior member

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    Do you have alternative dehumidification? A properly sized AC should take a bit of time, since you generally want the humidity taken out along with the heat. If you cool too fast, the AC won't be on long enough to dehumidify the place.
     


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