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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    In My Douchemobile
    Large beehive in my eves to be removed. Full perimeter installation of special metal vents that cover the "bird hole" style vents in place, special screening over all my roof vents, covers at either end of my scupper pipes, etc. etc. Yes, a nice 1.4k bill on a Friday afternoon.
     
  2. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    I would have just bought a can of Raid and gone to town.
     
  3. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Just when I was getting caught up, I was sitting on the patio taking a break when I noticed several large lizards and newts on one of the doors to my shop. They were eating termites coming out of the door frame. Great.

    Metal trim around doors is awful. It's easy to damage, hard to repair -- and you can't tell what's happening behind it. I pulled it off and found that some buffoon had already replaced the bottoms of the door jamb and brickmold, but apparently didn't bother to fix the source of the water infiltration that'd caused them to rot the first time. I pulled the drywall around it (have to do some drywall work anyway from the electrical) and found what looks like an old infestation that's been treated before. Damn them. No serious damage, but it'll end up costing me a couple hundred bucks -- new door, trim, drywall, pesticides, etc. I should treat the whole perimeter of the house while I'm at it. But that was supposedly done about five years ago.
     
  4. omgitswes

    omgitswes Senior member

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    Apr 3, 2010
    Has anyone ever resurfaced a cracked concrete patio? I have a concrete slab in my back yard that I want to resurface and maybe lay down pavers. I'm pretty sure the pavers will be pricey, but would like to hear first hand experience on how difficult it is
     
  5. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Did it crack because there weren't natural points for it to expand and contract? I have an area that it looks like the previous owner did himself, and it wound up cracking because it was just one large piece. When I had someone come out, they said it would be better to just replace it because it will keep happening.
     
  6. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    If you're going to lay pavers, why do you want to resurface the concrete first?
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. Snoogz

    Snoogz Senior member

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    Cali
    I layed pavers on our dog run. And I layed it over a 2 inch surface of sand graded the way I needed for drainage. Took about 12 hrs from start to finish. Not sure what your talking about with pavers over concrete...?
     
  8. ChrisGold

    ChrisGold Senior member

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    Agree with the above posters. Cracked concrete patio will just keep cracking more and should be removed and then lay the sand for the pavers. That's like a 2 case of beer job with some buddies and a small dumpster or other type of haul away bag. (depending upon the patio size)
     
  9. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    You just sit them right on the concrete, leveling with sand when necessary.
     
  10. ChrisGold

    ChrisGold Senior member

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    You can do this, but not on top of cracked concrete and not if it doesn't already have the proper slope away from the home. Additionally, you need to install a border course first or else you will see the edges of the concrete. That border has to be bonded to the concrete. Not a small job either way, but doable.
     
  11. sonick

    sonick Senior member

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    Vancouver
    I want to get a wooden shower mat, is there much functional difference between teak and bamboo? e.g. slip resistance or water resistance?
     
  12. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    You don't *have* to mortar down a border course. You can use plastic paver edging, at least if the slab is close to the ground. If it's done properly, you could go right off the slab onto an adjacent stone/sand base.

    An ordinary crack wouldn't be a problem. If the concrete had shifted dramatically then, yeah, you shouldn't try it. But that should be obvious.
     
    Last edited: Apr 12, 2015
  13. omgitswes

    omgitswes Senior member

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    I'm not sure why it cracked, it was like that when I moved in. But it's huge cracks, large pieces are broken off to the point where I can just lift it up.

    So if I were to add pavers over the concrete, I would have to resurface it to make the surface even to lay them.
     
  14. joelscott7

    joelscott7 Senior member

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    I used to do this over the summers when in university. As long as you have some patience it is very easy to lay down pavers. Makes sure you dig deep enough and pack the sand/screenings every few inches and your patio will last.
     
  15. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

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    Yeah, but did it by getting a bobcat to tear the whole stupid fucking thing up, cart it away, dig the area s it's sloped correctly, pour new concrete with rebar and expansion joints, and laid blue geometric flagstone on top. Total cost ~$25/sf.

    Oh, the one removed was concrete + flagstone, not just concrete.
     
    Last edited: Apr 13, 2015
  16. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

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    Nov 15, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco
    SF hivemind, i have a question for you and hope you can steer me in the right direction.

    I had the power go out during the night at my house, i know this because all time on appliances was reset. Nothing major happened but after wards and idk how much of this is a coincidence one of my automatic garage door openers isn't working. it allows the door to come up about 1/4 way the stops like it smacked something and then i can get it to go down. I feel like there may be an issue with the chain but i don't see any issues there. Anyone know how to debug this or have any sites that i can read through on what to fix?
     
  17. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

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    Careful, those springs can have a lot of tension. If you're not sure what the problem is or how to fix it, call a pro. You'll be out $100-200 but will keep your fingers.
     
  18. sinnedk

    sinnedk Senior member

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    thanks man, i am not sticking my fingers in em. i unclipped the garage door from the chain and turned it of when i had to touch anything. I am definitely not risking it.
     
  19. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Nov 28, 2012
    Can't you pull the red cord to make it manual open to help diagnose it? See if it catches on anything?
     
    1 person likes this.
  20. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Agreed with all the above. If you can manually open and close it, it is obviously something with the opener itself. Be careful with those springs though, especially the old style ones.
     

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