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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    Yeah been eyeing those black friday miter saw deals. I do still need one to do the trim work around here and for building a fence next summer. Not sure that I need a 12" though, and I hear they are considerable larger than a 10" - any thoughts?


    Having trouble finding a current online code for the 10% - do you have one handy?
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2014
  2. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    You replace the Rs with random numbers. Kind of a grey area but they've been doing it for years and years without Lowes ever complaining.

    http://slickdeals.net/f/7071014-lowes-com-coupon-code-for-20-off-100-10-off-or-10-off-50-25-off-250

    A 12" is larger and significantly heavier, but there's a very real increase in cutting capacity. I prefer the accuracy of a fixed 12" over something like a sliding 10". The sliding saws have a very large footprint too.

    I would figure out the size of the moulding you're planning to use and see if you can cut it with a fixed 10." If so get one of those instead. But remember you're not always going to do flat 90 degree cuts.
     
    Last edited: Nov 28, 2014
  3. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    yeah, we might be doing molding over 4 inches plus who knows what for the fence. Going to go with the 12 inch. Actually I found a 12" hitachi with dual bevel and laser that is very highly regarded for $220 so I'm going to jump on that. I hear the dual bevel (not having to flip things around etc) will save a DIYer much heartache and waste.
     
  4. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    1 person likes this.
  5. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    That is the one - I went ahead and bought it anyway (thanks for the help with the discount code!) as the reviews on Lowe's website are fantastic and the price step up for a dual bevel in another brand is significant.
     
  6. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    I have a fair number of Hitachi tools and they're all great, so I'm sure it'll be fine. They're probably all made in the same Chinese factory anyway.
     
  7. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    I gave my father a hitachi chop saw to replace the craftsman death trap he was using without guards. It's pretty sweet, works nicely.

    I use a handsaw and a shooting board myself,
     
  8. Snoogz

    Snoogz Senior member

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    Sawzaw freehand ftw...

    But seriously I finally upgraded my kit and bought a porter cable set w/ lithium batteries. Have done a few outdoor projects that included a playset and a 12 foot divider picket fence partition for our dog run. So far I'm satisfied with this set for home DIY stuff. I've probably got less than 30 hrs on them though.
     
  9. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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  10. texas_jack

    texas_jack Senior member

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    Finally got our old house rented out. Here's to hoping nothing breaks/they don't screw us.
     
    1 person likes this.
  11. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    They started residing my house today, or more accurately started tearing off the old siding. As expected, there is no vapor barrier and there is some serious rot to the garage, and they are going to need to replace the underlayment. Additionally, which was not expected, they found out the roof on the garage was not done correctly. They can take a shortcut and be okay, they think it will cause water damage overtime and ruin the siding, so new roof on the garage too!
     
  12. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Have what sounds like a water leak in a wall not near pipes. A dripping sound can be heard when the toilet is flushed but then it trails off. I tried tracing the pipes in the basement and stand where the drip sound is while my wife flushed the toilet but I can't see or feel any water from the pipes. Very odd.

    Have someone coming out Thursday to check on this as well as another random dripping sound. I assume water leaks behind drywall end up costing $$$. Hopefully nothing too serious...
     
  13. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Had a similar situation happen two weeks before my wedding (Murphy's law no doubt). Cost me about $150 to fix, since I did the work (remove and replace a section of the ceiling along with repairing the pipe and replacing some fittings) that included some work on the outside of the house and some woodwork as well.

    All depends on what's involved and what's leaking.
     
  14. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    I wish I had more experience with plumbing and drywall as I would go exploring. An additional thought is that only the toilet creates the sound. Showers and faucet usage do not recreate the drip. If I can get out of this for under $1,000 I would be happy. That should then fix all of the little things the house has had since we moved in and we can save for bigger projects.
     
  15. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    Siding is almost done, and it looks great!
     
  16. archetypal_yuppie

    archetypal_yuppie Senior member

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    What are some of the best websites for DIY guides or videos?

    I assume youtube has a lot of stuff, but there is no filter for people who know what they're doing vs. people who don't.



    My interests range from basic electrical (replacing outdoor sconces without getting killed) to sheetrock & patching sheetrock to trim & mouldings, etc.



    Contractor is redoing 50% of my house there are some things I'd like to address later myself.
     
  17. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Best advice I can give would be to watch several youtube videos and use your common sense to decide who's giving the best advice. Read the comments. I've never found a good all-in-one source for that kind of thing. The guides published by magazines are mostly useless.
     
  18. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Don't Home Depot and Lowe's offer free courses on weekends? Basic wiring is easy as I have replaced light fixtures both inside and outside. Having the necessary tools makes it a hell of a lot easier. Drywall and such seem like a PITA
     
  19. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Figure if someone were billing me per hour for the work I did myself, it would have likely came close to $1000 before re-painting. I always receive f-u pricing when requesting small jobs, which is why I decided to tackle drywall and paint for myself. I do a type 4 prep, which is something most contractors will not generally do unless requested specifically. For really bad drywall I do type 5 to get it totally smooth.

    I have a lot of bucket ceiling lights in my house, which show every minor uneven area in drywall, so I had to get good at it to do anything worth painting over.

    Proper tools get you half way there if you already have mechanical ability, and all I needed was to review a few videos on YouTube. Three rooms later and one redo and I am producing work which has held up well over time without noticeable uneven areas when light shining across it.

    I use eggshell paint, so it's not the easiest thing in the world to achieve but it's not reserved entirely for professionals.

    I've painted three big rooms for about $500~ Using regal from Benjamin Moore, Quotes were thousands.


     
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2014
  20. RedLantern

    RedLantern Senior member

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    +1

    when I'm about to undertake a project I generally research for quite a while, read, watch youtube videos etc. Once you actually start on the project you will probably have additional questions or a uncommon situation which will require additional research, but IMO the initial round is still needed just so that you can get a holistic idea of what you're doing and how it should go.
     

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