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Numbernine

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seems to me (dunning-kruger warning) that once you think about it, gas is less scary than pressurized water. residential gas pressure is like 1/4 psi and water is 40+ psi.

plus with the odorant in natural gas it's a lot easier to detect a leak than (for example) a pinhole water leak in your wall that leads to black mold and rot.

but of course gas go boom and your life is over. water don't go boom.
As long as you know
what you're doing gas is pretty safe to work with. We weld pipes with gas in them to make a hot tie in. As long as the pressure inside is positive it just burns like a stove, gas inside fire outside
 

Van Veen

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As long as you know
what you're doing gas is pretty safe to work with. We weld pipes with gas in them to make a hot tie in. As long as the pressure inside is positive it just burns like a stove, gas inside fire outside
the real scary thing #1 with gas is when it builds up in a confined space. that's when it goes boom.

it actually can be bad to open a window in that situation (say, you've been away for weeks and come back to the strong smell of gas in your house) because gas can only ignite w/ the proper mix of gas to oxygen. if the gas concentration is too high (or low, obviously) it won't ignite.

the real scary thing #2 is improper venting / carbon monoxide buildup.
 

PhilKenSebben

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seems to me (dunning-kruger warning) that once you think about it, gas is less scary than pressurized water. residential gas pressure is like 1/4 psi and water is 40+ psi.

plus with the odorant in natural gas it's a lot easier to detect a leak than (for example) a pinhole water leak in your wall that leads to black mold and rot.

but of course gas go boom and your life is over. water don't go boom.
Totally true. 5millionnhomes a year are destroyed in water pipe explosions
 

jbarwick

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This igniter fix is the same as one on a gas grill. Unplug the old one, pop in a new one, and good to go.
 

NakedYoga

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I’ve been researching my family’s history. My grandparents bought a home in the late 1930s for $2800 ($55000 now). According to the 1940 census, they had a combine annual income of $1805.
Interesting thing is the ratio of home cost to income. For your grandparents, it was 1.55x annual income. Nowadays, people don't blink at spending 3x annual income in some cases.
 

Gibonius

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Interesting thing is the ratio of home cost to income. For your grandparents, it was 1.55x annual income. Nowadays, people don't blink at spending 3x annual income in some cases.
3x? Shoot, banks will approve you for 5x and people definitely go for that.
 

NakedYoga

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3x? Shoot, banks will approve you for 5x and people definitely go for that.
That really is crazy to me. My wife and I spent 1.37x combined annual income on our current home in summer of 2019. We were certainly prepared to spend more, but found a great deal and offered asking (after 2 prior deals fell through during the inspection phase). We weren't going to spend 3x+, that's for sure.
 

Fueco

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3x? Shoot, banks will approve you for 5x and people definitely go for that.
Ours was somewhere around 4.5X, at the time (we’ve paid off more than half of it in less than six years). To be fair, I don’t know what my grandparents were making at the time they bought the pace. My income knowledge comes only from the 1940 census. They could have also been intentional about living below their means. In 1940, they already had four kids (my dad was the fifth, and last, kid) and the MIL living with them.
 

venividivicibj

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That really is crazy to me. My wife and I spent 1.37x combined annual income on our current home in summer of 2019. We were certainly prepared to spend more, but found a great deal and offered asking (after 2 prior deals fell through during the inspection phase). We weren't going to spend 3x+, that's for sure.
Good luck finding homes in SoCal for 1.5x income
 

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