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The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

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  1. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Modern t5 fluorescents have LED beat in most measures except flexibility of the size of the fixture and dimming ability.

    Most of the under-cabinet LEDs have a light color that looks weird (notwithstanding the rating) and poor color rendering. At least the cheap ones do, not sure about the high dollar ones.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014


  2. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Our kitchen could use more lighting but that is pretty far down my list of improvements. Fence is getting installed next week, weather permitting, so that will slow some spending down. We went with 5' aluminum fence but I forget the top pattern. Something with spikes.
     


  3. otc

    otc Senior member

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    If you want to do something slick, I'd say expect to rework the wiring (as in, you probably want to replace the power cable and switch with something hidden/integrated), but the strips themselves are pretty nice and the light is good.

    Of course once you aren't using their wires...you might as well just get your own AC/DC converter and buy LED strips in bulk (unless the $15 ikea ones are actually cheaper)
     


  4. imatlas

    imatlas Senior member

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    We just installed a glass enclosure in our new bathroom. Originally the plan was simply to have a glass panel in the section by the showerhead, but we added a steam shower, so it had to be a full enclosure. Very wasteful of us, of course. If I were more of a man I would have built it from scratch out of old sheets. We opted to skip the glass coating, on the advice of our glass guy, so I'm going to pick up some Rain-X and use that instead.

    We are putting in dimmable LED undercabinet lights, possibly from Halo but I can't recall at the moment. They are a bit whiter than our overhead lights, but for task lighting I think that's fine.
     


  5. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    Our bathroom is clear glass and lots of marble. Here is an unfinished construction photo:

    [​IMG]

    The walls got white marble subway tile, the shower floor was done like the rest of the floor (also marble), the bench in the foreground also got subway tile up the sides, and the sill and benchtop got a polished carrara slab. Two glass walls enclose the shower, with a door obviously where the sill is, and the other wall halfway across the bench (the other half outside the shower is where we keep a towel basket and a magazine rack - because the toilet is there to the right, outside the frame).

    So yeah, I like the clear glass and marble. Thought about a solid slab shower enclosure but that was a little over-the-top for us.
     


  6. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Thanks guys for the lighting input
     


  7. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    You should also consider that LEDs from generic makers are unreliable and vary from lot to lot; if one fails in a year, you probably won't be able to replace it. Or, at least, you won't be able to replace it with one that produces identical light.
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2014


  8. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    I am redoing my french doors -- got the blinds between the glass, fancy handlesets, etc. Paint, bondo, new seals and bottoms.

    Formerly I had levers and they're kind of crummy, especially since the "dummy" versions don't actually match the operating ones. Imagine my surprise.

    The dummy handleset is supposed to be poor, too, so I thought I'd just drill a hole in the non-operating door and put a regular operating handleset in it (without the latch, obviously). But someone recently told me, quite adamantly, that the fashionable thing to do these days is just have one handle on french doors.

    Is that true?
     


  9. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    If both doors open I think you need two door handles but if one door doesn't open I have seen them with one handle. Can't say I have a preference other than both doors opening is always nice.
     


  10. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    French doors where only one door opens are referred to as Polish doors.
     


  11. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    You can open and close the door, but 99% of the time it's latched in place. This is kind of a moot point since I already bought the handlesets for it. Lost my hole saw though; gotta make a trip to harbor freight to get another one before I put it on.

    My response to the suggestion, by the way, was "Is that what your builder told you?"
     
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2014


  12. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    Heh, check your local laws , you might need to obtain a government permit for second handle and then of course your tax assessment should go up.
    BTW, they are called "Freedom Doors", if you love your country.

    :D
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014


  13. jgold47

    jgold47 Senior member

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    Why?
    Remove ASAP
     


  14. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    My heating system is made in that manner. My boiler air intake pipe is inside the exhaust pipe. I believe it is called concentric system. The outside exhaust pipe will warm the cold combustion air to achieve more efficiency.
     
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2014


  15. jgold47

    jgold47 Senior member

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    I think your talking about something different. Your talking about a concentric intake/exhaust system, think pipe in a pipe. He's talking about his actual ducting, which is a no-no because among things it completely screws up the airflow.
     


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