The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Senior member

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    Recall I have two small children.
     


  2. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    The thing I find with online pictures is they post a Full or Queen sized bed then throw a larger comforter on to make the pictures work. Our King size items have hardly any hang over either.

    My fiance puts a blanket on the comforter but it is too warm. Somehow she sleeps fine while I bask in my own sweat.
     


  3. poena

    poena Senior member

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    Don't know about size but I use a down comforter from Lands End with down pillows from LL Bean. Absolutely love them!
     


  4. NorCal

    NorCal Senior member

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    This is some quality advice right here.
     


  5. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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  6. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Well our house is under contract and the inspection was satisfactory, today we go for an inspection on the house we want but I had a question regarding asbestos. The house was built in 1959/1960 should this be a worry? No easy to spot tile/pipe insulation but I have read walls can be made of the stuff and since we are going to remodel 3 bathrooms at some point we will have to deal with it.
     


  7. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    I don't believe it should, at least in my region. My parents had this problem with a home from the 30's, I believe the state's cutoff was 1948.
     


  8. brokencycle

    brokencycle Senior member

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    My house is from the 50's, and there is some asbestos floor tiles, but that is it. Nothing in the walls.
     


  9. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Thanks idfnl an broken cycle. If anything there is some asbestos insulation in the attic but it is such a PITA to get to we are not worrying. Otherwise the inspection went well!
     


  10. Frist23

    Frist23 Member

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    Glad to hear the inspection went well, jbarwick!

    I wonder if people here have any tips for saving money on home expenses. Some good ideas I've heard are to have a energy use audit, possibly for reduced cost/free if you qualify for a grant, insulating rooms, and using water efficient shower heads. Also, I've read that programmable thermostats can save 10% on heating expenses; is that actually true? Sounds too good to be true!
     


  11. Ketawa

    Ketawa Senior member

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    I just bought a programmable thermostat, the Ecobee Smart Si. I didn't need the features of the next model up.

    The rate of heat loss for your home in cold weather (or the opposite in hot weather) is a function of the difference between the indoor temperature and the outdoor temperature. If the disparity is larger, your home loses heat faster. You can save money by setting back your thermostat when you're away, then having it come on so that your home will be at the desired temp when you return. The system will run less time overall compared to maintaining a constant temp. How much you can save is hard to say.

    Personally, I think the programmable thermostat is going to save me a lot of money and will hopefully pay for itself soon. My typical energy bill is only $110 for a 1500 sq foot condo, YMMV. I have a heat pump system which is far more efficient at heating using the compressor than the auxiliary electric heat strips. The thermostat is smart enough to start heating early using only the compressor to meet my set limits before I return home from work. It also uses the outdoor temperature to judge how early to start heating. My old thermostat automatically started using aux heat as soon as it was off by 2 degrees or more (I think). I'd set it back when I was gone, then I'd be too lazy to go back and change it every 2 degrees when I returned, so I'd heat everything up all at once with the aux heat. I also wasn't diligent with setting it back, while the programmable thermostat is working 100% of the time. It will send an email alert if the system is suddenly being forced to use aux heat all the time, or stops working while I'm on vacation, etc. The phone app is nice in case your plans change while you're away.

    Overall, I'm very pleased with it. $100 cheaper than a Nest and the Amazon reviews for the Nest are pretty negative. Just give me something I can set up and will work.

    Check with your power company on the home energy audit. Mine offers them for SFH only, no condos, unfortunately. Not sure I'd get enough out of one to make it worthwhile. The power company will pay for one maintenance trip for my heat pump.

    I also just switched to LED bulbs for my most frequently used fixtures. Not a monster savings, but my break-even is after about 18 months. The Cree bulbs are pretty great.
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014


  12. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    We will most likely do an energy audit. We know the windows are older and we can add some insulation under the main floor of the house where the garage is because that wasn't required when it was built in 1960. It will just be a work in progress with a lot of little items adding up over time but it was our choice to buy an older (and in our opinion better built) home than a newer one.
     


  13. Medwed

    Medwed Senior member

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    Consider replacing window glass with a thermoglass (double-glass panel with gas in between). Older house often has thicker wooden windows and they could be retrofitted with a modern glass. Also, insulate your basement it drains a lot of heat. Make sure heat inspection checks for drafts from doors and windows and marks them. If you can live with Warm-White LED lights buy them on Alibaba.com directly from Chinese, then sell the overstock on ebay and make money.
    I personally hate water-saving showers, I use gas, tank-less water-heater and it works for me and my girl.
    What type of heating do you have in your new house, forced-air?
     
    Last edited: Jan 22, 2014


  14. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    I think it is forced air and not a heat pump. As for doors, they are all solid wood and have this metal weather stripping that doesn't let a thing through. Also surprisingly is that the doors have no gap movement from the house settling. I would say that means it is pretty well built given it is 55 years old.
     


  15. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    I would like to use fiber cement siding along the lines of the dark gray stuff in the photo below as the exterior cladding for my garage, but I'm having a hard time finding good information on it. There's a wealth of information on the lapped, faux wood grain Hardiplank stuff, but I want more modern smooth finished, non-overlapped siding panels. I need to choose a manufacturer and from what little I can find, James Hardy is the ubiquitous, middle-of-the-road choice, Maxitile and Certainteed have some vocal, unhappy customers due to siding shrinkage, and Nichiha is widely considered good but expensive. I also need to figure out how to install the siding panels so that they shed water since they are not overlapped. Does anyone know anything about this style of siding or have any suggestions for where I could some good information on it?

    [​IMG]
     


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