• STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

Michigan Planner

Distinguished Member
Joined
Jan 18, 2010
Messages
5,026
Reaction score
5,953
I borrowed my father-in-laws power washer to clean off my patio and walkways. Even after reading all the warnings not to point it at any body parts and my FIL reminding me how powerful it is, it took a lot more will power than it should have to resist spraying it directly at my sandal-clad feet.
 

Omega Male

Distinguished Member
Joined
May 30, 2013
Messages
8,772
Reaction score
18,645
1623371276366.png
 

Fueco

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Mar 8, 2012
Messages
16,089
Reaction score
30,117

Van Veen

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Jun 14, 2011
Messages
11,517
Reaction score
12,455
Had a dead tree taken down today. This was the last big liability that came up on the inspection.

We overheard one of the crew saying it was “beyond dead.”

F52DF693-8DDB-4727-A8B9-2936371C46D5.jpeg

I would have loved to leave it for wildlife, but it was close enough to the house that it would do major damage if it fell.
 

double00

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
11,347
Reaction score
13,021
 

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
20,932
Reaction score
12,448
I think that's kind of a hard sell--as the article mentions, you can just google most buyers/sellers if your sole intent is to not sell to a black person (or similar).

You'd have to make real estate transactions essentially become blind, but that's never going to happen. The Realtor lobby would probably love it though...anything that creates further legal requirements for their services is great for them.

Furthermore, they are often semi-complex transactions--they aren't always going to be "high bid wins" since there are often material differences in contingencies, closing times and overall risk of the deal falling apart. Being able to communicate around these issues can have a meaningful impact on the negotiation.

I suppose it also becomes a first amendment issue on some level--the government can't force sellers agents to censor ALL speech of prospective buyers simply because the content of that speech MIGHT open up lines of discrimination.

edit: and....is it any surprise that the bill's author is a realtor and receives a bunch of campaign contributions from the Oregon Association of Realtors? This isn't about discrimination, this is about making realtors lives easier and making them more necessary (now, will FSBO properties suddenly open themselves up to liability if they don't have someone to filter correspondence? Maybe not for real, but it gives realtors another scare tactic).
 
Last edited:

double00

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Nov 24, 2014
Messages
11,347
Reaction score
13,021
to your edit, no, it isn't a surprise that a realtor is involved with this sort of legislation. or that any industry would be involved in legislative process, i think you'll find it's fairly common. also there is quite a bit of anecdotal evidence in this threak suggesting that plenty of realtors engage in the practice , i can't really buy teh realtor cabal bit . i have no idea whether the gov of oregon will sign the bill.

i'm not sure *free speech* really applies to commercial transactions in the way you are suggesting have you gone libertopian otc?

the selling decision is by definition divesting stake in place, community, etc. why should that party vet any fit beyond the transaction itself (they're gone!), and why would personal circumstances (typically the tenor of those letters) govern the viability of the deal? the answer is of course that it doesn't. it's simply a seller's market atm, these letters seem to be an informal emotional narrative version of earnest money (but without providing any actual surety lol)

in a buyers market nobody in their right mind would write a letter. hey if you can swing a property with a letter don't mind me. for me no to the unwritten rules i can negotiate just fine without closing distance on a seller
 
Last edited:

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
20,932
Reaction score
12,448
i'm not sure *free speech* really applies to commercial transactions in the way you are suggesting have you gone libertopian otc?
This is the government passing a law that blocks speech. A letter from one party to another is speech.

Just because the actual mechanism of the law forces a non-government entity to the actual act of censorship doesn't change the fact that law is an explicit restraint on speech. This is not a business simply deciding they won't pass along letters (in which case sellers would be free to choose agents who *do* pass along letters if they want).

As to why should the party vet any fit--I already answered that in part. These are complicated transactions and there are lots of instances where some explanation could matter as far as the offer. If I tell you I am moving from the other side of town, am used to living in areas with well/septic, and already have a good job, I'm probably a hell of a lot more likely to get approved for my loan AND follow through with the purchase after due diligence than some buyer moving from Phoenix who is planning to find a new job on arrival.

Also, not all sellers are rational or are leaving the area. Maybe they are moving 2 blocks away and just really want a family who appreciates the landscaping and vintage charm of the house and will keep it that way and would be willing to forgo an extra $5k from some couple that's probably going to tear it down and build a glass & steel vacation home that will sit empty for 9 months out of the year or an investor who is going to turn it into a party-house AirBNB. Yeah, we don't want people discriminating on protected reasons, but I don't see any issue with people deciding they like one buyer over another for non-protected reasons.
 

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
20,932
Reaction score
12,448
As to why should the party vet any fit--I already answered that in part. These are complicated transactions and there are lots of instances where some explanation could matter as far as the offer. If I tell you I am moving from the other side of town, am used to living in areas with well/septic, and already have a good job, I'm probably a hell of a lot more likely to get approved for my loan AND follow through with the purchase after due diligence than some buyer moving from Phoenix who is planning to find a new job on arrival.
And anecdotally, even though my realtor doesn't like these letters, she keeps talking about deals that fall apart for reasons that are relevant to this discussion. They are seeing a lot of out-of-state buyers (especially CA remote-worker types) who blow the deals up when they actually come visit in person and decide its not quite the dream they had in mind. There is earnest money (1% of bid), but apparently state rules make that incredibly easy to get back upon inspection. Fly out, bring an inspector, if you don't absolutely love it, they can find what you need to break the contract.

This has lead to a situation where in addition to your typical preference for cash buyers/waived appraisals, sellers are also putting a lot of weight on things like whether or not you've seen the home in person (which likely means you are already living/renting nearby given short deadlines and travel difficulties to the area), are using local lenders, have local ties, etc.

That's where I see a letter helping us even if the seller doesn't care about the heart-strings/community aspects. My wife has a job with a start date. We're moving here and we have a deadline to get it done--we're not SF tech workers feeling out the possibility of various remote-work locales. Unless there's a huge appraisal gap or irreconcilable inspection issues, my loan is 100% getting approved and we are closing with the first seller that picks us.
 

Piobaire

Not left of center?
Joined
Dec 5, 2006
Messages
75,334
Reaction score
47,627
Why is it the government's business on how two willing parties interact for the sale of residential real estate? What's next? Offers can only be submitted on Tuesdays?
 

otc

Stylish Dinosaur
Joined
Aug 15, 2008
Messages
20,932
Reaction score
12,448
And yeah, I would expect realtors to be involved in any legislation involving realtors.

But when a member of an industry is coming forward and proposing *restrictions* on what people in that industry can do...I tend to think there's an ulterior motive at play. Not always, but rarely do industries voluntarily self-regulate for the good of the populace.
 

brokencycle

Stylish Dinosaur
Moderator
Joined
Nov 21, 2008
Messages
21,451
Reaction score
17,605
Why is it the government's business on how two willing parties interact for the sale of residential real estate? What's next? Offers can only be submitted on Tuesdays?
Why should government be involved in any contract between two willing parties?


I'll go back to libertopia now.
 

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Featured Sponsor

Favorite Shorts Length

  • Above the knee

  • Knee length

  • Below the knee

  • None of the above

  • Mid-thigh ("short shorts")


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
461,729
Messages
10,018,092
Members
208,423
Latest member
hitechbimservices
Top