The Home Ownership Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Douglas, Jan 31, 2012.

  1. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    US average is 12.5 cents IN SEPTEMBER. The correct average is probably closer to http://www.wolframalpha.com/input/?i=average+kwh+electricity+cost+in+usa+2012

    Regardless, where I live its 7.7 cents so I am going to calculate a ROI based on what I pay, not on a national average. ROI for me is 7 years.

    Reality is this is a shitty value proposition for me and anyone paying close to my rates.
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2013


  2. Douglas

    Douglas Stupid ass member

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    According to your calculator, my payback is 13 months on the 9 bulbs I replaced in my kitchen.

    And I was actually fairly conservative on my usage estimate. I replaced my kitchen floodlights, which are more or less always on when I am home, including during daylight hours, because my house doesn't get great natural light, for a variety of reasons.

    FYI.
     


  3. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    I never indicated whether I had money to burn :satisfied:
     


  4. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt The Liberator Dubiously Honored

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    This hasn't gone well for you.
     


  5. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    Is there something special about September?

    If you're paying 8 cents per KwH for electricity, more power to you. But no one else is.
     


  6. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    I don't know, is there? The link you posted was for September.

    What you're saying is also not true about rates. Utah, Wyoming, Arkansas, West Virginia all pay less. I do happen to live in one of the lowest priced states, though.



    Its case by case. For me, I get lots of natural light and don't use much artificial light at night. I generally keep most of the house dark. I do see houses around me where they are lit up like an Xmas tree but for someone like me its not a good investment.

    For my situation, its better to wait a couple of years for prices to drop. Another calculation folks are ignoring is sunk cost in bulbs I already have that are at 10%, 30, 50% of their life. Those recessed bulbs are like $9 a pop and in my kitchen alone I have 8. In my family room there are 9. Right there that's like $150/half-life average which is $75 I have to gain back for a true break even...
     
    Last edited: Dec 18, 2013


  7. JohnGalt

    JohnGalt Senior member

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    17 months for me. I'll take it.
     


  8. GusW

    GusW Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    As you get older you require more light. Especially at 40. Your sense of color also changes and things can tend to look a bit more yellow/gold, so clean bright color corrected light really helps in selecting clothing and accessories.
     


  9. idfnl

    idfnl Senior member

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    I second this. I have a very bright light in my closet too.
     


  10. rohde88

    rohde88 Senior member

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    Exactly my concern. I suppose I can do lighting and fans piecemeal, but major moulding/railing type changes need wholesale, no?

    Thanks for the (conflicting?) advice.
     


  11. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Well we were counter offered with more than we are willing to pay for this house with the condition of the bathrooms. The worst part of this experience is the people selling the house are RE agents. Most of this area has 1 story ranch style homes while the one we are looking at is a 2 story which makes comparables a little tough. Add to that the comparable $ per sq/ft are all over the board which makes submitted a reasonable offer tough.

    If anyone wants to offer their input on the numbers side that would be great. We offered 6.6% off asking price. The counter was for 2.2% off asking. 5% off is where I feel comfortable knowing we will have to put in 30-60K ball park for new bathrooms over time. Add to that some fencing and we are looking at 45K-75K in additional funds on top of the sales price. There are ways to bring those costs down but if we totally redid everything this is the cost for someone else to do it.
     


  12. Piobaire

    Piobaire Not left of center?

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    HOAs have NO power over you. (SWIDT?)
     


  13. Ataturk

    Ataturk Senior member

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    jbarwick:

    Around here at least it's not unusual to have more than one set of counter offers. I wouldn't presume to tell you how to negotiate, though. Ask your agent if you have one.

    You just need to sit down and decide what the house is worth (sounds like you've already done this), then decide what it's worth to you to get this house, now. Sometimes getting the right house in the right neighborhood at the right time is worth more to you than it might be to an ordinary buyer -- worth paying a little more than it's worth. Not a lot more, of course.
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2013


  14. 1wb

    1wb Senior member

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    +1. There are really two guiding factors: (1) the house is going to sell for what someone is willing to pay. In that sense, it is "worth" whatever the offer is that the seller accepts. If you want the house, you will have to offer more than the other buyer does. If you are looking in a tight market, and the other buyer thinks it is worth asking price, then it is. (2) As an upper limit, however - if there is financing involved, the house will have to appraise out at the selling price. So ultimately a lender - the other buyer's or yours - might end up determining that the house is worth the same amount you think it's worth.
     


  15. random-adam

    random-adam Senior member

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    This. Our buyer's agent handled all our negotiating; in late 2010 we offered 22% below list, got countered the next day with 6% below list, counter-countered immediately 16% below list, and they stewed for a couple of days before accepting 16% below (which we thought from the beginning was a fair price; we started low to get them there). That property was also owned by the listing agent.
     


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