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The Great Navy Blazer Conundrum

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Caustic Man, Feb 8, 2013.

  1. taxgenius

    taxgenius Senior member

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    I'm considering getting a navy sport coat in Minnis Fresco with smoked MOP buttons and patch pockets. My question is regarding the breast pocket. Should that be a patch pocket too?
     
  2. add911_11

    add911_11 Senior member

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    Yep go for it.
     
    1 person likes this.
  3. msulinski

    msulinski Senior member

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    You can go either patch or welt. The more conservative approach is welt. If you are unsure, probably welt. I happen to like the patch breast pocket, but if I get another patch-pocket jacket, I would probably go welt just for variety.
     
  4. Victor Elfo

    Victor Elfo Senior member

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    Personal preference. I do not like patch breast pockets, but if you do: get it.
    Honestly, one could argue that a patch breast pocketed jacket is not suitable for a work meeting, but, unless you work in a super conservative office, no one really cares.
     
  5. msulinski

    msulinski Senior member

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    Eh, if you work in a conservative office, you probably shouldn't be wearing a patch pocket jacket at all.
     
  6. Victor Elfo

    Victor Elfo Senior member

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    Since you went pedantic. [​IMG]
    You assume that every conservative office is the same and you ignored my nationality. It's logical to assume that a conservative office would be more prone to summery details if it's based on a hotter country and, since I'm from Brazil, my standard of conservative office would follow the logic that I just exposed.
    But, eh, I wasn't following that logic, so your comment was justified. Nice intellectual exercise.
     
  7. archibaldleach

    archibaldleach Senior member

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    Entirely personal choice, but I'd say go for it. I prefer patch pockets on any odd jacket that is not double breasted.
     
  8. Balfour

    Balfour Senior member

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    I thought I would add to this thread, rather than make a new one.

    I have blazers for summer and winter.

    I'm looking for a versatile option for much of the year. Yes, I know, there is no 'four season' cloth. But I run hot. London summers and winters are mild (average high in the summer low 70s).

    Unsurprisingly, fresco wins much acclaim to this end (see below). My question concerns trousers:

    • Would mid-weight gray flannels look 'off' with a fresco jacket? I don't think so from comparing the texture, but would people find this so (given the associations of fresco with the summer and flannel with the winter)? What about in the heavier weight recommended by vox?

    • If so, what would people recommend for colder days? Fresco trousers on a fresh spring morning would be a bit nippy.

    ..........

    Manton recommends 10 oz fresco:

    Vox recommends 13/14 oz fresco:

     
    Last edited: Oct 4, 2013
  9. BespokeKiwi

    BespokeKiwi Senior member

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    I'm not sure whether this thread is still active or not. In any event, please find below my belated contribution on the topic.

    As you can see from the images below I'm a fan of polished/shiny buttons, which I appreciate is not everyone's "cup of tea". In this case, 4-hole polished gold-toned alloy buttons.

    Shortly, I intend moving the buttons (4-hole polsihed gold-toned) from my new navy blue blazer (pictured below) onto my new black blazer (not pictured below) and replacing them with 4-hole polished .925 silver buttons, which I had custom made recently.

    As many of you who are James Bond movie fans will know, the combination of a navy blue blazer and 4-hole polished silver-toned buttons was famously worn by Roger Moore's James Bond character in the movie "Moonraker".

    Moore's James Bond character followed the precedent set by Sean Connery's character in the original "Dr No" movie, albeit I think the later's blazer buttons may have been 2-holed and in the more traditional polished brass/gold-toned alloy coloured metal.

    P.S. This post is a continuation of a series of posts on the Hong Kong Tailors thread.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: May 11, 2014
  10. vida

    vida Senior member

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    Has anyone ever used nailhead as a blazer fabric? I have started seeing quite a few pop up for the spring with patch pockets. But, I always saw this more as a suiting fabric…
     
  11. archibaldleach

    archibaldleach Senior member

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    I'd consider nailhead a suiting fabric generally. I tend to think that some fabrics make for much better blazers than others, but as long as it's clearly designed as a blazer (metal, horn or smoked MOP buttons that don't match the jacket plus patch pockets), I'm not interested in being too much of a stickler. Others may feel differently. Could be worth asking about in the Unfunded Liabilities thread too.
     
    1 person likes this.
  12. Isolation

    Isolation Senior member

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    What about navy Birdseye (for SC not blazer)? I think it'd make a nice patched unlined SC.
     
  13. archibaldleach

    archibaldleach Senior member

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    Not my first choice personally, but can be done. I believe @in stitches has one, but could be misremembering.
     
  14. in stitches

    in stitches Senior member Moderator

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    Yes thats correct, I have one. Its an Isaia for SFA and I like it a lot. Its about as formal a navy SC as you can get. Which of course limits its use to a degree, but I find it very useful when I am going for a SC and tie and want something very crisp and formal leaning but not quite a full suit.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. colco

    colco Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    @Isolation, this here is a nice bird's eye done up as a db jacket. Lighter than navy blue. I think what makes it work (not confused as suiting) is that it has a ton of texture (50cashmere/50silk).
     
    2 people like this.
  16. CSG123

    CSG123 Member

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    Earlier in this thread, there were some comments about brass buttons on blazers where a few people said no to them. Conversely, I wouldn't wear a blue blazer without them. That's the correct and traditional look. Now, for me, where I used to like the many brass buttoned double breasted blazers, I now longer wear that style. I have two blazers currently, a hopsack 2-button and a merino 2-button. I wear one of those more often than anything else when it comes to a sports coat. However, I like them better with khakis than the gray flannel slacks I own. Always with penny loafers or Topsiders.
     
  17. colco

    colco Senior member

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    Many feel the metal blazers are old-fashioned (I prefer to think of them as traditional). No reason not to own either a traditional blazer with metal buttons, or a blue odd jacket with pearl or brown depending upon your personal style and preferences. I'd think quite a few guys have both.
     
  18. Isolation

    Isolation Senior member

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    I bought a set of buttons for that but ended up decided against it. There's too much baggage in them. I already get told captain jokes, don't need to help it. I do think it's probably regional though. You just rarely see anyone with them normally here.

    Plus I like MoPs anyway,
     
  19. colco

    colco Senior member

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    Brown horn is the most discreet. MOP somewhere in the middle (I've got a coat with pearl buttons that can appear silvery in some lighting), then metal. I like them all and in NE of the US none raise any eyebrows or cause others to comment.

    I'd be curious to know how many blue jackets some posters have. I'd think most have at least two for different times of year.
     
  20. Sam H

    Sam H Senior member

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    Since this thread has already been necro-bumped, I just visited Mr. Ned yesterday for the first time to get my first tailored piece of custom clothing (besides shirts which I recently also started doing about a month ago at Cego).

    That piece of clothing is a navy blazer.

    One interesting point of note is that he showed me two basic blazer navy fabrics he typically uses one being a hopsack, I believe, and I told him that I was looking for "serge" given that I heard that was the traditional worsted fabric for blazers and I wasn't really looking for a hopsack. He told me that a serge fabric would be a 1 season weight but showed me some anyway. I kind of agreed and just ignored the advice I heard online after seeing the serges he showed me and picked the non-hopsack blazer fabric he initially pulled out. It was just a basic dark navy merino wool.

    When I got home I looked closely at the swatch he gave me and I realized, serge must mean two different things. This fabric I picked is definitely a serge in the sense it is a twill with diagonal bottom left to top right ribbing with bottom right to top left ribbing on the reverse. But apparently serge to a tailor means some specific heavy, one season cloth and not just this twill weave of navy merino wool.

    Anyway I'm excited for the fittings
     

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