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The Future of Tailored Clothing

dauster

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I worked in a physical retail setting throughout the pandemic (my industry was deemed 'essential') and so I've had the fascinating opportunity to see people's dress change in front of my eyes. Yes, for a while there, people were absolutely coming in unshaven in their pyjamas, up to and including the mayor. Over the last few months since vaccinations reached their peak and the city re-opened, there has absolutely been a surge in tailored clothing. More men in full suits, more men in casual suits, flashy show-off (eg bright pink) suits, and a lot of separates on middle aged men. The feeling I get from all of them though is that these are not new things for them, that they've had these garments in the closet and now they're taking the opportunity to dust them off, rather than guys who have gone out and bought tailoring for the first time.

As has been discussed at length, style these days comes from the 'bottom-up', and so if tailoring is ever going to see a resurgence, it needs to be easily accessible by men who are intrigued enough to try dressing better (a lot of men), but don't care enough to put in a lot of work or to make it their hobby (this tiny collection of nutjobs). They need to be able to walk into a store, feel comfortable in there, spend a reasonable amount of money for a non-enthusiast (>200 IMO), and then look and feel good after. You can get cheap, but the cut is often so awful from brands like H&M and Target that you're immediately uncomfortable, mostly around the armholes and shoulders. You can get kind-of good items, maybe from a politician/ceo catering boutique, but the price is absurd for 90% of the population.

Think about what the actual experience of going shopping was like back in the heyday of suits - an abundance of reasonably priced stores that you, as a man with no knowledge except 'I want to look sharp' could walk into and walk out of happy. Susu is going a long way, and there's been a very clear correlation in my city between when they opened and how many young men I see in tailoring, but it needs to go much further still. When Target fixes their cut and fabric, and begins to market it, that will be the day tailoring truly comes back to the population, mark my words.
my biggest problem these days is that I can't rely on any sales people anymore. even at super high end spots I have had terrible experiences. Nobody cares about the product they are selling anymore. The other day some overweight sloppy sales person was literally dragging my tom ford suit over the floor when she was bringing it to me to try on - wtf? That was at Neiman Marcus.
 

rjc149

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Biglaw in the NYC/Chicago establishments follow Wall Street, since much of their business caters to that clientele. Wall Street began relaxing its dress code to business casual a few years ago, mainly to cater their business to the tech industry and to compete with the tech industry for young talent. So biglaw is following suit. Or no suit, rather. Programmers don't like wearing suits. "Quality of life" perks offered by Google, Facebook, Bloomberg etc. -- one of which is relaxed dress codes -- are very real selling points for young millennials and netgens.
 

TheChihuahua

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Law firms have already had relaxed rules on dress (except while at court or in some cases with certain client meetings). Even big ones, even in big cities.

that said, a lot of lawyers are still going to dress well. Generally a jacket and tie is required at court, so unless one is purposefully bringing2 outfits to work so they can purposefully dress down after court,that person will be dressed formally throughout the day (or will simply take their tie off).

also, there is a reason why people dress professionally. Part of that reason is to instill an air of confidence and authority with either a client or co workers or others who they may run into. maybe not for that specific moment, but to build that image over time. That reason still exists, and is not going away.

keep in mind most of these firms already have a ton of employees who don’t have a formal dress code and wear the corporate drone (khakis and a button with Johnson and Murphy shoes) to the building every day. Support staff, temporary/staff attorneys, etc…
And it has been this way for a long time (at least 20 years)

Many of the players at the firm want to distinguish themselves from some the IT guy or some part time attorney brought in to code some documents. How do they do so? By dressing the part.

of course there will be some attorneys with senior influence or pull who view this as a chance to rid themselves of the noose around their neck, the too cool for school guys, but I’m not sure how much or how quickly that will actually catch on. For many attorneys that requires a second set of clothes at the office (something I have admittedly done in the past, but ultimately found to be a silly chore).

also, while some people of influence might take the too cool for school approach, a lot of associates and junior partners will still have some fear of being perceived as inferior or underperforming or failing to play the part or not commanding enough respect if they don’t dress the formal part.
These are competitive jobs where most associates do not ever make partner. It’s not about being cool and chill and relaxed in Biz Caj. Sure one might be able to get away with it, but for those who are looking to do more than just “get away with it” and actually make partner I’m not sure how many will intentionally place themselves at a potential aesthetic disadvantage
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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not unless we all turn into vampires and monsters. cant stand rick owens
Rick Owen's work has aged better than much of #menswear, partly because the designs are so outlandish, they become semi-exclusive. Not many people are willing to dress like that or have the means to afford it. The cutaway collars, blueberry plaids, bright-colored shoes, beaded bracelets, double monks, and other #menswaer trends, on the other hand, trickled so far down that they ended up on Michael Cohen and MSNBC news anchors.



EPqQgO0UcAIUTK_.jpeg

EPqQd9wUYAAiHgo.jpeg
 

rjc149

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Brian Williams struggling to stay relevant.
 

suited?

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my biggest problem these days is that I can't rely on any sales people anymore. even at super high end spots I have had terrible experiences. Nobody cares about the product they are selling anymore. The other day some overweight sloppy sales person was literally dragging my tom ford suit over the floor when she was bringing it to me to try on - wtf? That was at Neiman Marcus.
The idea that value can be found in almost any job by taking pride in the quality of one's work seems to be a fading sentiment, unfortunately. At least your experience didn't turn into this...

 

dauster

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The idea that value can be found in almost any job by taking pride in the quality of one's work seems to be a fading sentiment, unfortunately. At least your experience didn't turn into this...

lol that thread escalated quickly. I have to admit I that I am aware that the average SAs doesnt make that much but I do think I should expect a certain level of service when you sell me super expensive stuff - but I guess that world barely exist anymore.
 

comrade

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Rick Owen's work has aged better than much of #menswear, partly because the designs are so outlandish, they become semi-exclusive. Not many people are willing to dress like that or have the means to afford it. The cutaway collars, blueberry plaids, bright-colored shoes, beaded bracelets, double monks, and other #menswaer trends, on the other hand, trickled so far down that they ended up on Michael Cohen and MSNBC news anchors.



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I don't get the comment about Brian Williams. He dresses like a mainstream CEO in
an old-line company, possibly in the Mid-West.
 

ValidusLA

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I don't get the comment about Brian Williams. He dresses like a mainstream CEO in
an old-line company, possibly in the Mid-West.
I believe the comment is directed at his strappy man-bracelets. Which are def a little i-genty.
 

Phileas Fogg

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Rick Owen's work has aged better than much of #menswear, partly because the designs are so outlandish, they become semi-exclusive. Not many people are willing to dress like that or have the means to afford it. The cutaway collars, blueberry plaids, bright-colored shoes, beaded bracelets, double monks, and other #menswaer trends, on the other hand, trickled so far down that they ended up on Michael Cohen and MSNBC news anchors.



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Michael Cohen? What can you say about a guy who leaves in the stock “Isaia” lapel pin?

Brian Williams? Those bracelet each represent a time when his chopper crashed in a hot LZ when he was super combat journalist #1!
 

Texasmade

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Is that guy wiping off Rudy G’s drool? Wtf is happening in the first picture?
 

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