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The End of the Sartorial Road

ter1413

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:lurk:
 

Despos

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Is your lego structure a reflection of your one true self? Does it represent a higher aesthetic? Is it actually Lincoln Logs (American), Legos (British), or colorful sticks randomly shoved into wheels (Italian)?

View attachment 1312603


I miss the days of the True Lego Discourse on this forum. There used to be a wealth of Lego Knowledge here.
I just discovered nanoblocks
 

Big A

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I remember that list being controversial even when it was published. If you read through the thread, even guys like dopey said he thought the list didn't make sense. It was also published in 2012, around the time when everyone was bemoaning the death of CM. This was right after Vox published his rant and then went poof. So Manton tried to "revive" the forum.

I mostly lament that kind of thinking. I don't really care about what's on his list and whether it's correct.

Foo is in SLP and Patagonia now anyway. Iammatt wears zip-up hoodies. Will from ASW once asked me about Margiela. Vox occasionally wears RRL and just bought a FCL jacket.



No reason. I just tried different tailors and pointed to some fabrics. Those are just on the list because there's some of the trousers I wear most. I don't wear my Steed or NSM pants very often.
Surprisingly, I don’t remember the Vox rant.
 

Big A

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IMO that's the problem.

Stuff on Manton's list that I bought and never wear. If they disappeared from my closet tomorrow, I would never know:

-decent, non-chino khakis
-a navy worsted single breasted suit
-a mid to dark gray worsted single-breasted suit
-at least one funky (but tasteful!) non-blue tweed jacket
-at least one pair of brown suede shoes
-several blue BC shirts
-black stitch caps
-some tasteful brown oxfords (exact configuration up to you)
-a solid black tie, knit or grenadine
-a solid navy tie, knit or grenadine
-a plain white linen hanky
-at least one formal tie, e.g., a B&W shepherd's check
-at least one wool or cashmere tie
-at least one linen or linen blend tie
-An overcoat in navy, charcoal or camel

Stuff on his list I don't own:

-at least one DB suit, navy worsted or medium gray flannel (the best dressers will have both)
-A complete, well-fitting, correct black tie rig, including shoes
-a white FC shirt

Stuff on his list that I bought and actually do wear:

-a blue odd jacket. If you live in a two-season climate, then two, one for warmth and one for the cold
-mid gray flannel pants
-loafers in medium brown calf, suede or shell or else burg shell
-at least one linen suit
I guess maybe I should revisit that thread because I don’t really see that as a problem, just as a difference. My complaint back then (Although I think it was probably expressed in a different thread) was that the sometimes fervent CMW faction was really just looking for an excuse to be boring (Or more specifically, to not have to think about things too much). I feel like that is the hallmark of Anton style. That’s not to say there isn’t complexity in understanding how one navy blazer might be vastly superior to another navy blazer based on fabric or construction or something like that. So if you have stuff on the list but you don’t wear stuff on the list to me that’s just a sign that you were thinking about things a little more creatively.... after all, there’s only so many different items of clothing you can wear in a year.

I guess if what we are talking about is the standard stuff that everybody “should” have if they want to consider themselves “well dressed,” the list would be much shorter IMO. However, I think most of not all of the items would be on the Michael Anton Forum Revival Checklist (tm)
 

Despos

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Is your lego structure a reflection of your one true self? Does it represent a higher aesthetic? Is it actually Lincoln Logs (American), Legos (British), or colorful sticks randomly shoved into wheels (Italian)?

View attachment 1312603


I miss the days of the True Lego Discourse on this forum. There used to be a wealth of Lego Knowledge here.
Nanoblock Pokemon. Gifted to me and very collectable.Pokemon.jpg
designer's logo on front. Anybody on SWD might recognize the logo
 

pleatedjeans

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As I get older, I'm both surprised by and not very surprised by the diverse stories I hear of people's backgrounds. I've met lawyers, doctors, and financiers who were into really obscure music scenes in high school (e.g. hardcore punk, straightedge, underground rap music, etc). Simon at Permanent Style said that he used to be into metal music. I've seen George at BRIO do a kickflip. I went to dinner a few months ago with a really well-dressed CM guy who shared with me his love for building motorcycles. He builds motorcycles and takes these crazy long camping trips in the woods. One of the best dressed CM guys on this board is also an electrician!

It's surprising to me because I would have never guessed having only seen them in CM. But also not that surprising because I think of all the people I grew up with, who were into all sorts of stuff, and now have jobs as doctors, lawyers, and academics.

I think people are more complex than they sometimes even give themselves credit for. People can be into all sorts of stuff, take weird winding roads in life, and hold contradictory beliefs (meaning, philosophically or in terms of their world view). If clothing connects to your identity -- and I don't think it necessarily has to -- it doesn't seem strange to me for someone to have a wardrobe that's as complex as them.
currently listening to Bolthrower and painting Warhammer wearing an Anglo-Italian suit
 

Despos

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To not just derail the conversation. My thoughts are closest to Waldo Jeffers.
If a definitive core of apparel items exists it can and should be interpreted to your environmental context and should be in consideration of your audience. A navy jacket can be worn in any context but the message can be modified by cloth type, texture, styling details and how you accessorize. What I get from those who bought the recommended pieces but have discarded their usefulness is the clothing choices didn't harmonize with their social/work context so they dismissed those pieces.
Clothing does communicate who you are. It's one of the major points of wardrobing for movies or plays. It is best used as a bridge rather than a statement. As a statement your attire is self serving in a negative way.
 

Patrick R

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To not just derail the conversation. My thoughts are closest to Waldo Jeffers.
If a definitive core of apparel items exists it can and should be interpreted to your environmental context and should be in consideration of your audience. A navy jacket can be worn in any context but the message can be modified by cloth type, texture, styling details and how you accessorize. What I get from those who bought the recommended pieces but have discarded their usefulness is the clothing choices didn't harmonize with their social/work context so they dismissed those pieces.
Clothing does communicate who you are. It's one of the major points of wardrobing for movies or plays. It is best used as a bridge rather than a statement. As a statement your attire is self serving in a negative way.
Let me use this opportunity to publicly thank you for guiding me into clothing that has been ideal for my environmental context. It's one of your greatest strengths as a tailor and that's saying a lot since the quality of your clothing is second to none.
 

Knurt

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I use some of my better suits and sportcoats when I lecture or give seminars to non-academic audiences. I used to dress more casually. I thought that signalled I wanted to be the equal of students and the audience, as well as that felt more natural for the boy in me. I find that in a suit and tie I respect the function I am filling, the importance of the occasion. I do not think I dress like this to create authority, although I may. Authority is something I have to take, and I can take that in more casual clothes. I read that «we» - the men of the moment - can choose what way we dresses, and in some way that is exactly what I am doing. But I do that as much to make a statement about the role I am assuming as something personal.
 

norMD

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Is your lego structure a reflection of your one true self? Does it represent a higher aesthetic? Is it actually Lincoln Logs (American), Legos (British), or colorful sticks randomly shoved into wheels (Italian)?

View attachment 1312603


I miss the days of the True Lego Discourse on this forum. There used to be a wealth of Lego Knowledge here.

With all due respect, Lego is from Denmark. All scandinavians get their first drivers license in Lego Land...
 

Despos

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Let me use this opportunity to publicly thank you for guiding me into clothing that has been ideal for my environmental context. It's one of your greatest strengths as a tailor and that's saying a lot since the quality of your clothing is second to none.
Thank you, R!
 

R.O. Thornhill

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As I get older, I'm both surprised by and not very surprised by the diverse stories I hear of people's backgrounds. I've met lawyers, doctors, and financiers who were into really obscure music scenes in high school (e.g. hardcore punk, straightedge, underground rap music, etc). Simon at Permanent Style said that he used to be into metal music. I've seen George at BRIO do a kickflip. I went to dinner a few months ago with a really well-dressed CM guy who shared with me his love for building motorcycles. He builds motorcycles and takes these crazy long camping trips in the woods. One of the best dressed CM guys on this board is also an electrician!

It's surprising to me because I would have never guessed having only seen them in CM. But also not that surprising because I think of all the people I grew up with, who were into all sorts of stuff, and now have jobs as doctors, lawyers, and academics.

I think people are more complex than they sometimes even give themselves credit for. People can be into all sorts of stuff, take weird winding roads in life, and hold contradictory beliefs (meaning, philosophically or in terms of their world view). If clothing connects to your identity -- and I don't think it necessarily has to -- it doesn't seem strange to me for someone to have a wardrobe that's as complex as them.
Too true! I spend most of my holidays ski mountaineering, often living out of a tent in the middle of nowhere
 

Liammccabe

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I've been on StyleForum since the beginning. In that time, I've learned a lot about men's clothing, significantly improved my wardrobe, and made some great friends, both online and offline. Maybe because it's the New Year (call it a resolution of sorts), but I've come to realize that I don't need or want to buy any more clothes. Partly because there are other areas in which I would like to spend money (watches, art, travel, kitchen renovation) and partly because I just want to enjoy what I already have. So while I'll stay on StyleForum to contribute knowledge where I can and live vicariously through other posters, it's the end of the sartorial road for me (at least for now), save for the occasional NMWA purchase with LuxeSwap credit.

Anybody else feel the same? Or is this just crazy talk?
I tend to drift between my passions, and dedicate resources variably! Last year was very much about watches and I purchased new timepieces and straps, researched a bunch etc. My first love was always menswear, but I hardly bought a new tie or pocketsquare in that period. Towards the end of 2019 though, I slowly shifted back and while I still love my watches, I'm very much back into investing in tailoring, shoes and accesories again.

I suppose what I'm saying is that, if you're anything like me, the pendulum will swing back in the other direction! And if not? No harm done, do
 

Ambulance Chaser

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Thanks all for your insights. This thread has gone in a lot of interesting directions I didn't anticipate when I started it.

Re. clothing as communication: I think clothing invariably reflects your personality. If you're a quiet and serious person, you're probably not wearing neon streetwear in your free time. Or even candy-striped shirts and loud ties at work.

Do you all see a consistent theme in your clothing? In other words, if someone were to look at your closet, could they tell it was the wardrobe of one person and what that person was like? I'm guessing most people don't dress like a New England prep one day and a goth ninja the next, but maybe I'm wrong.
 

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