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"The Dandy" delayed

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Manton, Jun 27, 2005.

  1. Earthmover

    Earthmover Senior member

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    The first time I've encountered the concept of Dandyism (English is not my first language) was when I was reading criticism of Eugene Onegin by A.S. Pushkin. Yevgeny was described as sort of one of the prominent figures of 18th century concept of dandyism. I guess I've always thought of it as quite a negative trait (read: vain, shallow, and a cad), and therefore was a bit apprehensive of the title. However, I simply assumed that my understanding of the definition was very different from the accepted usage. In any case, it's interesting to see that others have negative connotations of the word, although not for the same reasons.

    Looking forward to the book, Manton.
     
  2. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    If the proposed title were Shut Your F***ing Face, Uncle F***er, I'd see your point. As it is, the word dandy has some negative connotations as it is commonly used, but it's relatively benign. Given what Manton is trying to accomplish with this book, I can't think of a title that works better than The Dandy. If I could think of another word that carries the meaning that Manton imputes to "dandy" in his book, I would suggest it. As it is, I can't, and I don't think that other titles that I have seen suggested would work. This book will hardly spend 52 weeks on the New York Times best seller list. It will appeal to hard-core Italian Renaissance literature junkies and to those very interested in men's clothing. The first group will love the title; the second won't care.
     
  3. RJman

    RJman Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    One could always take inspiration from Baldessare Castiglione and call it The Modern Courtier, p'raps, but then we mix our Renaissance writers, don't we?
     
  4. jcusey

    jcusey Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Yes, but the mixture of themes is even more objectionable.
     
  5. weeks

    weeks Senior member

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    Haha.

    Those are good. How about "Full Throtle Fashion: A Nascar Fan's Guide to Dressing Well"
     
  6. dusty

    dusty Senior member

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    How about Fashion for the Gentleman or Gentlemanly Fashion or something along those lines? It's not as academic-sounding as The Dandy, but Manton has said that the book is more of a guide to dressing (rather than a study of dressing), so I think the title would be appropriate. No matter what connotation Manton intends when he says "Dandy," in common usage the word is more of an insult than a compliment. I don't think I've ever even heard the word used with a positive connotation outside these forums. I know the book probably doesn't have a broad audience, but it seems like calling it The Dandy would only serve to further limit it.
     
  7. Buster

    Buster Senior member

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    If I understood correctly, Manton wrote the book as a sartorial spoof on "The Prince". I can't see (well, maybe that's why I am not a publisher/editor) how you can preserve this with most of the suggestions.
     
  8. Nick M

    Nick M Senior member

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    The Dandy LOOK HOW MANY PUSH-UPS I CAN DO

    The Dandy YOU, ME, PARKING LOT, NOW.

    The Dandy OH GOD I LIKE WOMEN DON'T TAKE THIS THE WRONG WAY IT'S JUST A BOOK SOMEONE LOANED ME
     
  9. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    The cover image needs to make it clear that your dandy is on the understated side of elegance. But on the spine only the title will be visible.
     
  10. dusty

    dusty Senior member

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    Just how much is he relying on this allusion? I obviously haven't read the book, so I have no idea, but if the title is not crucial to the joke (and just how crucial is the joke?), then why risk limiting your audience over it? It's not like the title itself makes a strong allusion anyway; lots of books are called The Something. Would the reader even get the title joke unless he's read the thing (and The Prince)? He'd have to put a picture of Machiavelli in a seersucker suit on the cover.
     
  11. Buster

    Buster Senior member

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    I am sure he doesn't rely solely on the title, but a title plays an important role in any book (and even a more crucial role in a parody).
     
  12. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    Manton, firstly, congratulations to you.

    I've been considering titles, and there are a few nascent thoughts rattling around, but there are answers of which I'm not aware that would help focus everyone's efforts. Apologies if you've answered these elsewhere:

    What is the focus of your book, specifically?

    Who do you want to buy your book?

    Why do you want them to buy it?

    What do you want them to learn?

    What do clothes mean to you?

    Furthermore, I'm compelled to note that the current title doesn't impel me at all. Hope something better comes along.

    Regards,
    Huntsman
     
  13. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    I feel the same as Huntsman. I still believe it would be nice to see an abstract (should Manton be interested in a little brainstorming session on the SF).
     
  14. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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  15. Manton

    Manton Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Actually, I was thinking of a DB chalk stripe. Or maybe a single-peak windowpane. DB is better, though.
     
  16. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Thanks for posting this, dah328. Intelligent, helpful. I already have a few male friends in mind as recipients.
     
  17. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    PS: I suppose it is only intended for the US market, as many of the references would not be understood elsewhere, unless one is familiar with this culture.  It could naturally be adapted down the road for other markets.
     
  18. Keith T

    Keith T Senior member

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    I just want to wish you the best, Manton. Based on all that you have contributed here, I know the book will be great.
     
  19. Huntsman

    Huntsman Senior member

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    Matters Sartorial: Elegance and Power in Male Attire Matters Sartorial: How Clothes Make the Man Matters Sartorial: Clothes, and How they Make the Man Also try the first substituting "Presence" for "Power" and/or "through Clothing" for "in Male Attire." Depends on the timbre desired of the title. Regards, Huntsman
     
  20. chorse123

    chorse123 Senior member

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    Sartorial is too esoteric a word for the title. I think the best path--no offense intended to anyone here--is for the editorial, publicity, and marketing team to suggest something, as the goal is for the book to sell to the general public, rather than us fanatics.
     

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