• STYLE. COMMUNITY. GREAT CLOTHING.

    Bored of counting likes on social networks? At Styleforum, you’ll find rousing discussions that go beyond strings of emojis.

    Click Here to join Styleforum's thousands of style enthusiasts today!

The Bespoke Shoes Thread

Manuel

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
198
Reaction score
186
-----
 

Manuel

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
198
Reaction score
186
Re : MTM for shoes. In my case, recounted elsewhere in SF, even when the owner
and chief artisan ( I presume) measured my feet and had the opportunity to measure
and examine the shoes I was wearing, which fit perfectly, he failed to produce shoes
that fit. The fit was completely off and could not be altered. Upon reflection, mine was
probably a special case because several SF members have been satisfied with Maftei's
bespoke services. Nevertheless, I wouldn't even try a second attempt at MTM.
I do not think your case was special and the fit can always be altere in fact I have never left a dissatisfied client, if I had to disarm the shoe two, three times I have done it and even if after that I had to make new ones, although practically that has happened very rarely and only in cases extremes, malformations, sequelae of poliomyelitis ..... really hard cases.
There are no professionals or there are very few.
The disappointment makes the client not repeat but think that if it goes well also has a small problem, you get used to the good and walk well then you can not use anything else and that is expensive.
 

DWFII

Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
9,381
Reaction score
4,283
Feet are naturally resilient and adaptive...up to a point. That's the way the foot evolved.

The thing that so many don't understand is that while young feet can adapt and be comfortable with almost any fit...good or bad...feet do change over the years. A client can be totally misfit while the feet are young and it may not even be noticed. And eventually the foot becomes so habituated to that fit that anything else is considered a misfit...even if, structurally and by all objective criteria, a new pair of shoes is a perfect fit. .
 

DWFII

Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
9,381
Reaction score
4,283
For me, the ideal is a shoemaker who knows how to take measurements but forgets to take payment.
The more interesting question, from my perspective is "what is the ideal client?"
 

ntempleman

Senior Member
Joined
Dec 19, 2014
Messages
835
Reaction score
1,017
Me too, but I do not think my measurements are very different from yours.

Can you imagine a client with three different fit and all the shoes are perfect?

Can you imagine that you and I make a pair of shoes for the same client and are they perfect? We can assume then that something we will have done the same, no?
Our measurements will almost certainly be different enough to make a difference if we were to swap data and try to make shoes on them.

Do you believe there is only one “perfect” fit for each foot?
 

Manuel

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
198
Reaction score
186
Feet are naturally resilient and adaptive...up to a point. That's the way the foot evolved.

The thing that so many don't understand is that while young feet can adapt and be comfortable with almost any fit...good or bad...feet do change over the years. A client can be totally misfit while the feet are young and it may not even be noticed. And eventually the foot becomes so habituated to that fit that anything else is considered a misfit...even if, structurally and by all objective criteria, a new pair of shoes is a perfect fit. .
That is true, throughout my many years in the trade I have seen how the feet of the same client are gradually deforming and customers with certain shapes and used to walking like this, it has been very difficult to adapt the orthoses to improve their disease.
For some clients with severe dysmetria it is impossible in first shoes or boots to correct the heights so it is best to do it progressively, if you need for example 8 centimeters correct with 5 0 6 centimeters the first year and in the next match the height of your hips.
In other cases it is not necessary it is so much the patient's pain that the relief is immediate.

The more interesting question, from my perspective is "what is the ideal client?"
I think that there is no ideal client, all are good, some have more work than others but all are experience and satisfaction when the work done is perfect.
It is different if the shoemaker selects a type of clients with perfect feet for example or beautiful ladies .......
 

Manuel

Senior Member
Joined
Mar 25, 2016
Messages
198
Reaction score
186
Our measurements will almost certainly be different enough to make a difference if we were to swap data and try to make shoes on them.

Do you believe there is only one “perfect” fit for each foot?
You did not answer my question.
If our measurements are different enough one of the two will have failed in the execution and therefore the client will only feel good with a pair of shoes, yours or mine, but what would happen if both are perfect? Then what would happen?
No, I believe that there is a single adjustment for each client and it is the one that the client asks for. Satisfying the customer's wishes is the only possible adjustment.
 

DWFII

Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
9,381
Reaction score
4,283
Someone who doesn't read Styleforum?

I am not sure what you're getting at. If I thought that was true, I would not post here, I guess. Nor accept clients (when I was accepting new clients) from here.

StyleForum is like almost every other place on the Internet--full of misinformation and people who already know everything there is to know about a subject even if they have only limited personal experience. Whose primary source is "heard it on the grapevine."

Those who come here out of curiosity about their world or their areas of interest, or simply to learn, are far outnumbered (or so it sometimes seems) by those who are made uncomfortable with information that questions their own already embraced dogma and circumstances--whether it be psychological, financial or some other self shining posture they are associated with.

I think that there is no ideal client, all are good, some have more work than others but all are experience and satisfaction when the work done is perfect.
It is different if the shoemaker selects a type of clients with perfect feet for example or beautiful ladies .......

You're probably right about that. But at the same time there are clients from hell. DAMHIKT.

And clients I would not make a pair of shoes for...for any amount of money. And FWIW, it has nothing whatsoever to do with the client's foot.
 

patrickBOOTH

Stylish Dinosaur
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Oct 16, 2006
Messages
35,180
Reaction score
10,298
I'm very curious of cordwainers views on orthotics. If a shoe is made for a client, why do you need orthotics?
 

DWFII

Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Jan 8, 2008
Messages
9,381
Reaction score
4,283
I'm very curious of cordwainers views on orthotics. If a shoe is made for a client, why do you need orthotics?
Normally you don't. If you are asking, chances are you don't need an orthotic. Count your blessings. :)

But there are pathologies that the average shoemaker cannot address. A true fallen arch and the accompanying pronation, is an example. People who have severe problems with pronation have a great deal of difficulty 'toeing off' and walking normally--they tend to shuffle. As I understand it, the orthotic will support and elevate the medial side of the foot and allow for a 'normal' and proper gait.

A severely fallen metatarsal arch will sometimes need an orthotic if over-the-counter met pads are inadequate.

Pes cavus can be the cause of much metatarsal pain and supination. It may need an orthotic.

Other issues that can affect the foot, legs, knees, and back can be sometimes corrected or alleviated with an orthotic.

Just a few examples from a shoemaker...who is in no way an expert on the topic.

That said, few shoemakers are physicians. In Oregon, a shoemaker cannot even wedge a shoe...legally...without a prescription and a license.
 
Last edited:

patrickBOOTH

Stylish Dinosaur
Dubiously Honored
Joined
Oct 16, 2006
Messages
35,180
Reaction score
10,298
These poor people who possibly ruined their feet by walking in sneakers their whole lives!
 

Alan Bee

Senior Member
Joined
Sep 26, 2007
Messages
975
Reaction score
3,570
I'm very curious of cordwainers views on orthotics. If a shoe is made for a client, why do you need orthotics?
@patrickBOOTH

In my experience, the fit of a shoe and the function of orthotic are two entirely different things.

For instance, my black pair of St. C fit almost perfectly to a T. But I would have preferred an inbuilt pellotte and arch to lift my foot a bit and keep it from trying to move forward and hence brushing the front of the the toe box (which is uncomfortable). without the pelotte and side arch of a medical orthotic, you’re foot placement isn’t quite right (elevated) and this affects your gait and often will lead to foot fatigue.

However, with my custom shoes (or last), the instep is firmly fitted and keeps my foot in place preventing it from wanting to slide forward (common with flat feet). It also anchors your heel and reduces heel slip which is a common problem with flat footed folks.

Overall, I still would prefer the orthotic insole or a shoe with a built in orthotic. More comfortable and less fatiguing on the foot.

Alan Bee
 

Featured Sponsor

What's your favorite type of loafer?

  • Tassel loafers

  • Penny loafers

  • Horsebit loafers

  • Kiltie loafers

  • I hate loafers


Results are only viewable after voting.

Related Threads

Forum statistics

Threads
421,333
Messages
9,060,085
Members
190,716
Latest member
BLX

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by

Top