The Bespoke Shoes Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by jerrybrowne, Dec 25, 2014.

  1. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Presumably it derives from the French "croupe" (Partie postérieure du corps de certains animaux: "La croupe d’un cheval,") or the German "Kruppe". Both terms refer to the buttocks of certain animals, in particular horses and dogs.

    "Croupon" refers to the rear-section of a hide (in English usually called "butt").

    In modern German (speaking) shoemaking shell is called "Ross-Spiegel" (horse-mirror).
     


  2. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    that is a
    very nice looking
    loafer!

    a question:
    the heel cup seems
    very straight from
    the side view -
    is your heel straight
    ?
     


  3. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    Thank you. The heel cup does look very straight, although that might be because they are unlined loafers, and the actual "cup" is a small piece of supporting material sewn behind a strip of suede. It's not uncomfortable.

    My other Cleverleys have heel cups with more shape to them with the exception of a pair of crup chukkas. On that pair the heel WAS uncomfortable for the first 4-5 wearings....
     
    Last edited: Aug 5, 2015


  4. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    These are quite nice. Did they do a good job with the fit?
     


  5. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

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    Thanks. I probably should have waited to post until I've worn them more. I've only worn them a little around the house. I'm a difficult fit -- which is why I tried bespoke -- but I'm cautiously optimistic.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2015


  6. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    Fitting shoes for my Nicholas Templeman loafer last soon to be on my feet.

    [​IMG]
     


  7. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Are those just fitting shoes? - Hang on to those (for good). They are cute!
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2015


  8. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    Maybe I'll have a topy put on the bottom and make them into a pair of faux "Belgian loafers"!
     


  9. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Senior member

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    Anyone have thoughts on whether it's a good idea to commission true-blue, casual shoes through a bespoke shoemaker? Meaning something that you'd wear with raw denim jeans and a leather jacket, but commissioned through someone who typically makes dress shoes.

    I realize on face value this seems like a bad idea, but I'm curious if anyone has any thoughts about it -- or ideally, even photos of good examples.

    I've been thinking about getting a casual boot. Maybe something like this, which which was posted on Cobbler's Web's Instagram

    [​IMG]

    Except, since I'll only be wearing these with jeans and maybe a leather jacket, I would want the last to be much, much rounder/ more casual.

    Anyway, is this is a bad idea? Better to stick to dress shoes when going through a dress shoe maker?
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2015


  10. bienluienapris

    bienluienapris Senior member

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    In my opinion a shoemaker can do both casual and dress shoes, it's only a question of design. The work is the same. Look for exemple the big brand shoe (EG, GG etc...) they do dress shoe but also boots etc... some shoemaker can do very classic black oxford and equestrian boots. Really, i don't think it's a problem. More than that, a shoemaker who do a lot of dress shoe, i'm sure if someone arrive with a project of norwegian boots he'll be pretty happy to do something like that.
     


  11. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    It's perfectly fine idea.

    As with all bespoke process, its crucial to communicate your preference for the shape of the last. Especially true when you want "much, much rounder/more casual" lasts or maybe work boot types of lasts.

    The top bespoke makers will all execute most types of constructions well. Beware of some of the bespoke shops that don't use outworkers or take orders on boots; they might lack experience in making certain construction methods due to the lack of customer orders. Specifically, all flavors of Norwegian sewn, blind welted (or as Marcell Mrsan called "German welt"), etc.

    JL SJ, F&S, JL Paris all make riding boots. Tricker's has a bespoke shop as well, but don't think they travel to SF Bay Area.

    G&G made this for me. Its much less sleek in real life than in their pictures, but not as round as the shape of typical work boots.
    [​IMG]

    Here's another pair by G&G for another forum member.
    [​IMG]

    Otherwise, check out Role Club @ LA, Brian makes hand swen welted Engineer boots, bespoke MTO with last modification. Or Julian Boots if you can get Julian to make a hand sewn welted boots (his typical boots are GY gemmed); don't think he does bespoke.

    The Italians make great Norwegian sewn family of constructions as well, but not tall boots.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2015


  12. chogall

    chogall Senior member

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    Manufacturing processes are quite similar for all machine made shoes so shoemakers can modify some steps to make all kinds of welted shoes, including Norwegian welted.

    Hand made shoes are quite different as not every shoemaker/maker is familiar with all kinds of construction.

    There's certain amount of risk in ordering a Burrito at a Shawarma joint even if its on the menu.
     


  13. bienluienapris

    bienluienapris Senior member

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    What i mean is that almost all famous shoemaker (Delos, Ugolini, JL bespoke, GG bespoke etc...) can do a casual shoes. Of course it's better to talk with them before, but they can do it perfectly. All are not familiar with norwegian welt, but some are for exemple (Chogall demonstrate that).
     


  14. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    Nearly all of my bespoke shoes are like this. Some makers such as Foster and Sons and Lobb, are more accustomed to making a casual shoe and didn't need much coaching . Others, such as Cleverley, are more accustomed to making "sleeker shoes" and required a bit more back-and-forth.

    Some examples.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  15. The Thin Man

    The Thin Man Senior member

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    The only reason I could see doing this is if you had great difficulty finding boots that fit. It's a formula for creating something that's neither fish nor fowl. Would you order jeans, a t-shirt or a leather jacket from Steed?
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2015


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