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The Bespoke Shoes Thread

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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Anyone know what's the story behind this boot design? I've seen it come up a few times in really high-end ready-to-wear and bespoke. I think EG/ RLPL did a version. These are from John Lobb (London). Curious if there's a story behind this design. The number of seams, plus the seam placement, seems strange to me. Was this some design that came out of a war rationing period?


s-l1600.jpg
 

bengal-stripe

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It all begun with a classic English riding boot. But a well-fitting boot is difficult to get-into and even more difficult to get out-of. So versions with easier access, like the Field- or the Greenly boot came about in the 19th century.

Field boot.png Greenly boot,.png
The Field boot has an opening at the 'pass line', the Greenley boot's leg is open all the way and closed with straps and buckles (both samples by JLL). The featured JLL bootie is just a short version of a Field boot.

EG/RLPL used to have the 'Herrick' boot in their collection (not any more) which was a short version of the Greenley.

EG Herrick3.PNG

All the recent bespoke versions I have seen employ straps in one way or another. There is the one @poorsod had made by G&G

GG boots.jpg

or the one Jun Kuwana had made by Foster and Son

Kuwana boot3.PNG

Note:this boot hasn't got the typical riding boot seam combining front to back at the height of the heal breast.

DSCF4103.JPG

As seen here in the pattern for the boots yours truly had made. Here is the finished boot (hand stitched apron) together with the EG version (toe cap)
DSC_0002 (2).JPG
 

oscarthewild

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It all begun with a classic English riding boot. But a well-fitting boot is difficult to get-into and even more difficult to get out-of. So versions with easier access, like the Field- or the Greenly boot came about in the 19th century.

View attachment 1337383 View attachment 1337384
The Field boot has an opening at the 'pass line', the Greenley boot's leg is open all the way and closed with straps and buckles (both samples by JLL). The featured JLL bootie is just a short version of a Field boot.

EG/RLPL used to have the 'Herrick' boot in their collection (not any more) which was a short version of the Greenley.

View attachment 1337418

All the recent bespoke versions I have seen employ straps in one way or another. There is the one @poorsod had made by G&G

View attachment 1337419

or the one Jun Kuwana had made by Foster and Son

View attachment 1337421

Note:this boot hasn't got the typical riding boot seam combining front to back at the height of the heal breast.

View attachment 1337425

As seen here in the pattern for the boots yours truly had made. Here is the finished boot (hand stitched apron) together with the EG version (toe cap)View attachment 1337428

Wow!!!
 

Zapasman

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One more great post bengal.
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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It all begun with a classic English riding boot. But a well-fitting boot is difficult to get-into and even more difficult to get out-of. So versions with easier access, like the Field- or the Greenly boot came about in the 19th century.

View attachment 1337383 View attachment 1337384
The Field boot has an opening at the 'pass line', the Greenley boot's leg is open all the way and closed with straps and buckles (both samples by JLL). The featured JLL bootie is just a short version of a Field boot.

EG/RLPL used to have the 'Herrick' boot in their collection (not any more) which was a short version of the Greenley.

View attachment 1337418

All the recent bespoke versions I have seen employ straps in one way or another. There is the one @poorsod had made by G&G

View attachment 1337419

or the one Jun Kuwana had made by Foster and Son

View attachment 1337421

Note:this boot hasn't got the typical riding boot seam combining front to back at the height of the heal breast.

View attachment 1337425

As seen here in the pattern for the boots yours truly had made. Here is the finished boot (hand stitched apron) together with the EG version (toe cap)View attachment 1337428
Thanks, Bengal! Do you know the reason for the side seam?
 

dieworkwear

Mahatma Jawndi
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The ones you posted originally look a LOT like someone had their boots cut down to that height afterwards.

The side seam is a hangover from the original wellington boot, and the heel stiffener is sewn into place with it by the closer
Ah, that makes sense. Thanks!

I had no idea you can cut down riding boots like that, but that also makes sense.
 

ntempleman

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You can cut the top down anything after making, even a pair of oxfords.

The top like stitching looks slightly different to the rest of the boot, and the top eyelet is closer to the edge than any closer in their right mind would place it, it’s the general proportions being out of whack that stands out the most though. I would assume the owner wasn’t riding as much but still wanted something to wear around the paddock so brought them in for chopping down
 

takashi78

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comrade

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To add to the variations on this theme, I found these in and old Lobb catalog.
The Briar Boot, presumably to be worn in a literal or figurative briar patch.
ss744-briar-boot-john-lobb-bespoke-shoes-7477.jpg
 

takashi78

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In modern day times i fail to see why the need to having a boot that high up.
Especially going into the office LOL.
Jokes aside, great looking pair you have there.
 

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