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The Bespoke Shoes Thread

DWFII

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Dear Mastro @DWFII ,

May I know if the faux broguing is done before or after lasting?

If it has to be done after lasting, would stitching present a further technical challenge on seamless wholecuts?
Well, it can be done before or after. But it is always done after the leather has been blocked.

Understanding the difference between blocking and lasting, any stitching would be no more difficult than the broguing.
 
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DWFII

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What leather did you use there?
I don't really know. It was something I picked up as a 'job lot'...I liked the feel of it (the temper) and the fact that it was 'struck through'. I suspect it was/is a veg retan.

By the time the photo was taken I had already slipped them on to assess the fit...so the photo is not a 'presentation' photo. In any case, the fit was very, very good--as it always is (on my feet at least)...and I wear them as a dress shoe (with my bespoke suit which is very dk. green) relatively often.
 
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Coldfire3k3

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Could someone give me tips on key points to consider when evaluating the fit of a bespoke pair of shoes?

My understanding is that the heel should be held firmly, the toes should be able to wiggle and have some room, the vamp and sides should have a snug glove-like feel and the footbed of the shoe should follow the arch of your feet.

Is this correct?
 

bjhofkin

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Sounds about right but you forgot the part about feeling a certain sensation in your…well, you know…

Could someone give me tips on key points to consider when evaluating the fit of a bespoke pair of shoes?

My understanding is that the heel should be held firmly, the toes should be able to wiggle and have some room, the vamp and sides should have a snug glove-like feel and the footbed of the shoe should follow the arch of your feet.

Is this correct?
 

Zapasman

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in your insteps? :D
 

shirtingfantasy

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Well, it can be done before or after. But it is always done after the leather has been blocked.

Understanding the difference between blocking and lasting, any stitching would be no more difficult than the broguing.
Thanks. I need more knowledge before asking the question :p

I posted my more detailed review in another thread, for those who are interested.

 

Coldfire3k3

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How important is it to send bespoke shoes back to the manufacturer for resoling? What’s the risk in getting a good local cobbler to resole them instead?
 

DWFII

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How important is it to send bespoke shoes back to the manufacturer for resoling? What’s the risk in getting a good local cobbler to resole them instead?
Theoretically, the fundamental reason that HW'd bespoke shoes evolved the way they did was to maximize longevity and make resoling as easy and straight-forward as possible.

So...theoretically...if the shoe repairman (any shoe repairman) really does know his stuff and respects the shoe and the intentions of the maker, he should be able to return the shoes to nearly new condition, structurally, at least. Aesthetically, who knows?

Bottom line, however, is that you, as the customer, really don't know how skilled or experienced a repairman is simply because all you see is the superficial end result. And you don't have any way of knowing what materials he used (compared to the original maker) or whether he really and truly understands how shoes should be made. Many, if not most, repairmen have never made a shoe.

So...logically, you're always taking a chance with a third party getting involved. Less so with the original maker.
 

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