The Bespoke Shoes Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by jerrybrowne, Dec 25, 2014.

  1. ntempleman

    ntempleman Senior member

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    ive got a pair, which I've worn to near death. There is, or should be, a bit of U shaped elastic on the top of the instep, similar to what you'd find on an elastic sided shoe. Doesn't do a lot to hold you in, just gives a little wriggle room to get the rather high cut casual style on and off.
     


  2. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    wholecut chelsea
    black pebody boxcalf



    [​IMG]

    side elastic oxford
    dark brown alligator
    throat scales at tip
     


  3. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    Please post pics when done. The second pair in particular sound fantastic.
     


  4. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I’m kind of surprised that your shoemaker (Meccariello, I presume) has aligned the toe of the shoe towards the throat and does not have the toe pointing towards the “vent” (bum-hole to me and you), as I believe is standard practice. In a belly-cut hide you have about 2 or 3 inches above the hole the “umbilical scar” which forms an elongated star shape on the centre line. This feature is in the alligator particularly pronounced and is usually placed in a prominent spot (toe of a shoe, flap of a handbag).

    [​IMG]

    Here is a picture taken from the talented Mr W’s blog, which shows a G&G alligator whole-cut, with the toe aligned towards the vent:

    [​IMG]

    Just curious, did Meccariello give you an explanation why he did cut the shoe that particular way?
     


  5. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    yes
    i wanted it
    cut in that direction
    the scale pattern
    of teh throat
    was moar interesting
    to me
    than the
    umbellical scar
    to have at
    the tip
     


  6. Ric Borella

    Ric Borella Senior member

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  7. DWFII

    DWFII Bespoke Boot and Shoemaker Dubiously Honored

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    In my opinion, there is no valid reason to place the umbilical at the toe of the shoe.

    The most significant characteristic of alligator or croc is the regularity of the tiles. It is possible to match two skins such that the differences from one shoe to the other are not immediately apparent. From an aesthetic stand point, this is the ideal situation.

    There is so much going on with gator, visually, that discrepancies immediately draw the eye and shout "fire!" The human eye is hard put to find either respite or comfort in any appreciable asymmetry.

    That's why gator shoes that are pieced often look like hell. The tile patterns are disjointed and irregular and broken.

    Similarly with the umbilical. No two alligator skins will have identical or even roughly matching umbilicals. So to place what is fundamentally a randomly shaped blemish on the toe of a shoe...where it becomes an immediate and compelling distraction...makes no aesthetic sense, at all.

    IMO...

    --
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015


  8. marcodalondra

    marcodalondra Senior member

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    Here is my entry. The target is a burgundy/prune quarter brogue Oxford to try my lasts and make any relevant adjustments. Progress are slow as my Mistery Shoemaker is doing this in his spare time out of his main job.

    The last were made by Crispinians in London: [​IMG]

    Now the Neapolitan MS is slowly making progress:
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    If everything goes to plan I have about 9 pairs of classical variation of RTW shoes that will slowly by replaced to finally avoid the 3-4cm V gap I have so far had to endure on F fitting shoes due to my high instep.
     


  9. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'm re-thinking my travel wardrobes. The ideal is to have a collection of shoes all from the same last, so I can save space by omitting at least one pair of trees. Wear one, pack one (or two). For a longer trip, pack three but use only two sets of trees, and stuff boxers and socks in the third pair.

    The trick is finding the right combination for the road. Two-day business trips = 2 black oxfords (unless it's in California). Wear one on the train to NY, pack one for evening or the next day. Holiday travel will need at least one sturdy brown pair to handle walking on cobblestones, plus one black pair for nights out if I'm in a city. A soft pair of suede or grained derbies is a nice addition for comfort after a long day. Something that can stand up to lousy weather is a plus, since I won't have a full rotation to ride out the rainstorms.

    Air travel is tricky-- the obvious solution is loafers, but my best-fitting options there are either too flimsy for serious walking (Wildsmith/Edward Green) or lasted to induce a hint of back pain if I spend too much time standing in them (Alden). Not to mention the steel shank in the Aldens that require removal even when I get into the TSA-blessed security queue. In some ways, the safest way to handle the longest air trips is a pair of soft derbies, which won't require a shoe-horn to put on after x-ray, and which will comfortably accommodate even slightly-swollen feet at the end of the flight. Elastic slip-ons get good press, but if you can't find your shoe-horn after the x-ray or recreate one on the spot, you're screwed.

    After several months of neglect due to experimenting with Vass lasts and revisiting Edward Greens from a while back, I've come back to wearing some Cleverley shoes in the last few weeks. Even the ones I'd become less fond of are unexpectedly comfortable, so I think it may be time to renew one or more black oxfords. The very first (and maybe best) pair they made for me in 1997 is hopelessly cracked. I can wear them, but I have no desire to look like Prince Charles in that respect. The next pair (2000) is starting to show hints of cracking. Central heat, and lack of worry on my part are to blame on both of those. And there is some nasty salt damage on some 2005 black quarter-brogues that I'm still having trouble getting out. Anyway, now that they're admitting to using "crup," perhaps a pair of black shell cap-toes for use in the winter. Or sharkskin plain-toed oxfords, for mating with tweed or flannel, and/or slushy, salty streets. Those would handle nearly any trip to London or New York with no trouble, and I have enough browns to cover the rest.
     


  10. bengal-stripe

    bengal-stripe Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    One down, one to go:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  11. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    You must travel ALOT!

    This sounds very well thought out and I'm looking forward to seeing what you get made up. Do you mind posting pics of your current Cleverleys? Always nice to see well worn shoes....
     


  12. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    These really came out well, especially the penny hole and strap. Very nicely proportioned and difficult to do correctly. I assume you designed them.
     


  13. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Not a huge amount compared to some, but just often enough to worry about efficient packing. I suppose that if I did more of it, and all the same kind, I'd have my system completely down. Sadly, on those long flights (or in dull meetings), there is the temptation to draw grids with inventory, gaps, places to purchase more... Bad stuff, really. I'm always glad when I'm busy enough not to get distracted in this way.
     
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2015


  14. T4phage

    T4phage Senior member

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    very noice r!
    complimenti
    =)



    [​IMG]

    teh gator
    as a moc
    is really
    tempting...
     
    Last edited: Mar 25, 2015


  15. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Senior member

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    First pair of Japanese bespoke on the way thanks to the Oak Room and Il Quadrifoglio. Blucher saddle shoes.

    Based on these travel shoes;

    [​IMG]

    but with polo reverse calf, japanese Navy cordovan saddle and heel, and brass eyelets. Looking forward to this!
     
    Last edited: Mar 26, 2015


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