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The Bespoke Shoes Thread

psb

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I have RTW from both brands. Although the Buday fit me better, the leather from Vass appears to me to be thicker and less prone to wrinkles.
This is m first try of Buday shoes, until now i had mainly shoes from Heinrich-Dinkelacker.
 

Zapasman

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If you're talking about my illustrations, fig. #3 is not round closing. It's just a standard closing seam....can be done by machine.

#1 & #2 are hand stitching only. The machine that can do #1 or #2 at all, much less with finesse, has yet to be invented. I suspect it never will be.

Yes, split & lift (#2) is more difficult than #3. With split and lift you have to very precisely run the awl through the substance of the apron. Even on the vamp portion, the awl, while piercing all the way through the substance, has to be controlled as to how far way from the edge it is and how'straight' and consistent the line of stitching is. It is all too easy to get too deep or too shallow and weaken the seam. And much in the way of variation as to where the awl emerges (on either piece)tends to make the seam irregular and clumsy looking.

#3 is just piercing the leather grain to flesh, flesh to grain. The upright portion in the illustration could theoretically be any height, although naturally the more refined the better it looks.
Thanks!.
:cheers:
 

DWFII

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Alan Bee

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@Alan Bee

I agree with @DWFII. The important thing here is which you like the best.
They're all made to orders with very different styles. I prefer the look of the Edward Green, but then again I like the shorter 202. Subjective.
Did you go for the bespoke option of Saint Crispin's with fitting guarantee, or personal last with adaptions?

The GCs remind me of Ramon Cuberta. Looks like nice, finishing. Did you check if you won the Willy Wonka bespoke treatment?
@Stefan88

I didn’t go for the full bespoke treatment with St. Crispin. Phillip Car thinks it’s pointless. However, my last is heavily modified including inbuilt orthotics and is quite full bespoke in all but name (according to Philip).

He built me a trial pair of shoes which we have since further modified that to include inbuilt orthotics. The entire process has taken almost a whole year

Alan Bee
 

Alan Bee

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Personally, I like the St. Crispin the best from the pictures. I just think the shape and detailing fits my eye the best. I dont like the cap on the Cleverly, and the EG looks a little squatty to me. With that said, I am curious which one you like best, both from a style standpoint, but more importantly from a fit standpoint. As someone who has struggle to get a good fit in dress shoes most of my life, I am truly envious.

On a related but tangential note, as a small business owner in the luxury (I suppose) space, my goal in life is to find a customer (many) like you! :)

I cant say that even if money were not a concern that I would order three pairs of expensive shoes that are so similar in color and design. But as an internet style nerd, I have to say that I'm happy you did! Thanks for posting
@bdavro23

I wouldn’t say I have unlimited means or have nothing better to do than face off three top Bootmakers.

Like you, I have problem feet and had to discard my entire shoe wardrobe and start over. Previously I wore Edward Greens exclusively.

This time I wanted to be more thoughtful and experiment with different makers. Also, my personal preference is black and Burgundy shoes with business suits. Brown shoes I reserve for brown suits or sport jackets.

And so with the burgundy shoe project, I wanted three pair that would cover all bases. Conservative (St. C), Contemporary (Cleverley) & Country (Edward Green for tweeds and flannels).

I’ve taken the same approach to the black shoes and have a black pair by each of those makers including a marvelous whole cut for formal events by St. C

I don’t think I’ll be needing basic workhorse dress shoes for some time.

Alan Bee
 

bdavro23

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@bdavro23

I wouldn’t say I have unlimited means or have nothing better to do than face off three top Bootmakers.

Like you, I have problem feet and had to discard my entire shoe wardrobe and start over. Previously I wore Edward Greens exclusively.

This time I wanted to be more thoughtful and experiment with different makers. Also, my personal preference is black and Burgundy shoes with business suits. Brown shoes I reserve for brown suits or sport jackets.

And so with the burgundy shoe project, I wanted three pair that would cover all bases. Conservative (St. C), Contemporary (Cleverley) & Country (Edward Green for tweeds and flannels).

I’ve taken the same approach to the black shoes and have a black pair by each of those makers including a marvelous whole cut for formal events by St. C

I don’t think I’ll be needing basic workhorse dress shoes for some time.

Alan Bee
This actually makes a good bit of sense and could be a sound investment actually. Like many on this forum, when I started having clothing made, I ended up with quite a few pieces that in retrospect, I would have made differently or not at all. My style and preference has changed over the years and I think the experience of having clothing made taught me important lessons about the things I like and what I enjoy wearing. It also allowed me to learn some lessons about practicality and having things that are fit for purpose.

When I started my MTM company, I decided I would build a new wardrobe of my own making according to the rules I advocate for and the lessons I have learned over the years. Effectively, I am starting over in much the same way you are with shoes. It has actually been a very fun process, though I obviously wish I had the money from the mistakes I made. Still, I learned a lot from those mistakes and I probably wouldnt have started my own company without learning those lessons.

I have thought a lot about starting over with shoes as well, but that will have to wait. At some point I have to draw the line and say enough money has been spent! Good luck with your project, I hope you post the results here for all of us to see.
 

patrickBOOTH

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@Stefan88

I didn’t go for the full bespoke treatment with St. Crispin. Phillip Car thinks it’s pointless. However, my last is heavily modified including inbuilt orthotics and is quite full bespoke in all but name (according to Philip).

He built me a trial pair of shoes which we have since further modified that to include inbuilt orthotics. The entire process has taken almost a whole year

Alan Bee
Bespoke starts with your foot, all else starts with your wallet.
 

Alan Bee

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Bespoke starts with your foot, all else starts with your wallet.
Philip Car’s view (and I can see the logic) is that bespoke is not cost efficient. Bespoke doesn’t guarantee a flawless fit and with a heavily modified last you can get very very close to bespoke (95%).

Of course with bespoke we are referring to the John Lobbs, Cleverley’s etc which will run you £5,000 or so. I realize there are far many other bespoke options but I’m limited by geography.

Alan Bee
 

DWFII

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When I placed my order with Cleverley, they started with the foot, but I think someone else's.
No offense, sincerely, But if you had started off with the notion that there was more to bespoke...or quality, for that matter...than meets the eye, you may have had a better experience.

Or maybe not....both parties have to be dedicated and inspired.
 

DWFII

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Philip Car’s view (and I can see the logic) is that bespoke is not cost efficient. Bespoke doesn’t guarantee a flawless fit and with a heavily modified last you can get very very close to bespoke (95%).

Of course with bespoke we are referring to the John Lobbs, Cleverley’s etc which will run you £5,000 or so. I realize there are far many other bespoke options but I’m limited by geography.

Alan Bee
No offense to your mentor but it sounds more like a rationale than a reason. IMO...
 

dieworkwear

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Philip Car’s view (and I can see the logic) is that bespoke is not cost efficient. Bespoke doesn’t guarantee a flawless fit and with a heavily modified last you can get very very close to bespoke (95%).

Of course with bespoke we are referring to the John Lobbs, Cleverley’s etc which will run you £5,000 or so. I realize there are far many other bespoke options but I’m limited by geography.
John Lobb also starts with the foot. They measure your feet and then they have some of the makers in the back make the shoes with their feet. It's a very foot-centered process.
 

Alan Bee

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No offense to your mentor but it sounds more like a rationale than a reason. IMO...
Sir, pls read my post again.

You’re a master Bootmaker and no one would dispute full bespoke. But all things considered, the modified last I found suited my purpose best.

Alan Bee
 

DWFII

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. They measure your feet and then they have some of the makers in the back make the shoes with their feet.
What in the world does that mean?
 

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