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The Architecture Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Connemara, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    I'll take the lobby and a couple of rooms as my house, please.
     
  2. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    Why would you be inside with a view like that. ;)


    It's a 1900 acre development and it's not done yet.

    Golf clubhouse
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    The equstrian center
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  3. itsstillmatt

    itsstillmatt Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    The wild and the pure.
    You guys are all wrong on this one. It veers far too deeply into the beige tyranny of Architectual Digest.
     
  4. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    You have a pretty splintered relationship with wood, don't you?
     
  5. azumi

    azumi Senior member

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    Someone can tell me about the structure of this house (the roof, the column, beam etc) How can the two small column can support a large, thick roof? And what cover the surface which on the right of the last photo?
     
  6. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    I can't find a section to confirm, but the roof is most likely suspended from from two steel joists that run across the living room space. The joists are then supported by the structural steel fireplace and the white composite column. That allows the ceiling drywall or lathe to be bolted to a grid of either steel or wood battens that are set up directly under the joists. You can tell from the extended mass on the top of the roof that can be seen in the photos, which is then covered with insulation and some sort of lightweight cladding. It looks to be about three feet thick, so it's unlikely to have any other function but to enclose the joists.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2013
  7. henrikc

    henrikc Senior member

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    I tend to agree. Probably a pretty large I/H beam running from each corner, with smaller cross sections going from the windowless wall out to the large beam. I'm not sure if the fireplace is part of the structure though - without calculating anything I reckon the white column would be enough. Especially considering the heavy back wall, which would be able to take up a lot of the forces from the roof.
     
  8. henrikc

    henrikc Senior member

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    I could definitely see just this as a single-family home, with the living rooms on the other side of the stone wall. Perhaps like the villas in your other post, except with the highest wall replaced by the stone wall.
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  9. azumi

    azumi Senior member

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    I assume that the roof is made by some type of light-weight material. It's not armoured concrete roof, isn't it?
     
  10. Find Finn

    Find Finn Senior member

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    My guess would be some sort of steel space frame, with drywall and insulation "bolted" directly on to it.
     
  11. lefty

    lefty Senior member

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    Skyhooks.

    lefty
     
  12. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Archea Associati
    Arntinori Winery
    Chianti, Italy
    2012


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    Last edited: May 4, 2013
  13. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    Awesome. I'm ashamed that I managed to miss this last year while visiting Chianti.
     
  14. sugarbutch

    sugarbutch Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Astounding. The metalwork is gorgeous.
     
  15. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    Pretty impressive. I can't see how they can avoid raising their bottle price by at least $50 given what it must have cost to design and build that building, though.
     
  16. Pilot

    Pilot Senior member

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    As far as the actual construction of most of these places, is it mostly "specialty"-type contractors? Surely they don't let any old joe schmo with a hammer and nails go at something like that.
     
  17. UnnamedPlayer

    UnnamedPlayer Senior member

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    sloppy finishing, panel gaps everywhere.
    doesn't do it for me.
     
  18. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    For a large innovative project, most of the specialization is going to happen up front on the side of the material supplier and engineer (usually a third party), who will both be introduced early in the schematic design phase by the architect. The biggest engineering company for that type of work is Arup in London, who does a substantial portion of all the innovative work around the world, which this project broadly falls into. When the construction type is chosen by the architect, the manufacturer will go a long way to determine the actual design of building and the architect will be taking specs the manufacturer provides after a cost analysis. The actual construction will usually be handled by one of a handful of large corporate contractors with enough overhead to assemble nearly anything the material manufacture can provide. A firm like Turner would be a favorite if this were built in the States. For specific materials, there are few global suppliers of custom products that corner the market in each area. Lots of masonry products and glass come out of Germany and Nothern Europe. Japan is the leader in high performance structural steel. The Swiss specialize in high performance concretes and pre-fabricated composite constructions like insulated wood structural panels. The big metalworking firms that make custom cladding are in the U.S. Most of the specialists in each material employ engineers/designers that guide the design development and construction document phase with the local architect, who may or may not be the same firm that did the schematic design. That depends on the licensing of the architect in the area of construction, so you often have big name designers working with other local architects to do the construction documents and construction oversight.There are so many arrangements it's hard to generalize, but you'd often look at a project like this and expect it to be a collaboration between five or more firms, with the contractor being the least specialized. The exception to the rule in contractor specificity are civil engineering firms, petroleum engineering, mega high-rise construction, healthcare interior contractors, projects with extreme site foundation conditions, and other really technically rigorous sectors.
     
    Last edited: May 5, 2013
  19. StephenHero

    StephenHero Senior member

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    Marcos Acayaba
    Helio Olga House
    São Paulo
    1990


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    Last edited: May 8, 2013
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  20. SkinnyGoomba

    SkinnyGoomba Senior member

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    That house is awesome. Not sure I'm on board with the wood beam connection to the concrete pillars. I've seen how they strengthen a joint done in that fashion, but it still makes me uncomfortable.

    One thing that seems advantageous to brazil; the wood local to the area is incredible.
     
    Last edited: May 8, 2013

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