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The Architecture Thread

Discussion in 'Fine Living, Home, Design & Auto' started by Connemara, Jan 31, 2009.

  1. holymadness

    holymadness Senior member

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    [​IMG] http://www.planetizen.com/node/49661
     


  2. L.R.

    L.R. Senior member

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    Is this in Toronto by chance?
     


  3. meister

    meister Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    http://www.planetizen.com/node/49661


    Maybe - finally - they are a wake up to his brutal inhuman style and retrospectively are prepared to confront/demolish his overweened reputation.

    Of course Corbusier (the person) is indicative of where the style emanated. From Wikipedia...

    He was a pioneer in studies of modern high design and was dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities. Later commentators criticized Le Corbusier's plan to raze part of Paris and replace it with a grid of towers as soulless and arrogant, but his striking innovations have influenced every generation of architects that followed him.[1]

    Le Corbusier hoped that politically-minded industrialists in France would lead the way with their efficient Taylorist and Fordist strategies adopted from American industrial models to reorganize society. As Norma Evenson has put it, "the proposed city appeared to some an audacious and compelling vision of a brave new world, and to others a frigid megalomaniacally scaled negation of the familiar urban ambient."

    James Howard Kunstler, a member of the New Urbanism movement, has criticised Le Corbusier's approach to urban planning as destructive and wasteful:

    Le Corbusier [was] ... the leading architectural hoodoo-meister of Early High Modernism, whose 1925 Plan Voisin for Paris proposed to knock down the entire Marais district on the Right Bank and replace it with rows of identical towers set between freeways. Luckily for Paris, the city officials laughed at him every time he came back with the scheme over the next forty years – and Corb was nothing if not a relentless self-promoter. Ironically and tragically, though, the Plan Voisin model was later adopted gleefully by post-World War Two American planners, and resulted in such urban monstrosities as the infamous Cabrini–Green housing projects of Chicago and scores of things similar to it around the country.[21]

    The public housing projects influenced by his ideas are seen by some as having had the effect of isolating poor communities in monolithic high-rises and breaking the social ties integral to a community's development. One of his most influential detractors has been Jane Jacobs, who delivered a scathing critique of Le Corbusier's urban design theories in her seminal work The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

    Le Corbusier deliberately created a myth about himself and was revered in his lifetime, and after death, by a generation of followers who believed Le Corbusier was a prophet who could do no wrong. But in the 1950s the first doubts began to appear, notably in some essays by his greatest admirers such as James Stirling and Colin Rowe, who denounced as catastrophic his ideas on the city. Later critics revealed his technical incompetence as an architect. In his book ArmÃ[​IMG]e du Salut, Brian Brace Taylor went into great detail about Le Corbusier's Machiavellian activities to create this commission for himself, his many ill-judged design decisions about building technologies, and the sometimes absurd solutions he then proposed
     


  4. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    LeCorbusier was halfway between aesthete-savant and tyrannical monster. His urban schemes are nothing short of frightening. If anyone hasn't seen Jacques Tati's film Play Time , you should. It's probably the best film critique of international style urban schemes. Incredible clothing designs too. [​IMG] [​IMG]
     


  5. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    One of my favorites, though Mon Oncle is my go to. From what I understand Tati built almost that entire city for the movie.
     


  6. holymadness

    holymadness Senior member

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    Maybe - finally - they are a wake up to his brutal inhuman style and retrospectively are prepared to confront/demolish his overweened reputation.

    Of course Corbusier (the person) is indicative of where the style emanated. From Wikipedia...

    He was a pioneer in studies of modern high design and was dedicated to providing better living conditions for the residents of crowded cities. Later commentators criticized Le Corbusier's plan to raze part of Paris and replace it with a grid of towers as soulless and arrogant, but his striking innovations have influenced every generation of architects that followed him.[1]

    Le Corbusier hoped that politically-minded industrialists in France would lead the way with their efficient Taylorist and Fordist strategies adopted from American industrial models to reorganize society. As Norma Evenson has put it, "the proposed city appeared to some an audacious and compelling vision of a brave new world, and to others a frigid megalomaniacally scaled negation of the familiar urban ambient."

    James Howard Kunstler, a member of the New Urbanism movement, has criticised Le Corbusier's approach to urban planning as destructive and wasteful:

    Le Corbusier [was] ... the leading architectural hoodoo-meister of Early High Modernism, whose 1925 Plan Voisin for Paris proposed to knock down the entire Marais district on the Right Bank and replace it with rows of identical towers set between freeways. Luckily for Paris, the city officials laughed at him every time he came back with the scheme over the next forty years - and Corb was nothing if not a relentless self-promoter. Ironically and tragically, though, the Plan Voisin model was later adopted gleefully by post-World War Two American planners, and resulted in such urban monstrosities as the infamous Cabrini-Green housing projects of Chicago and scores of things similar to it around the country.[21]

    The public housing projects influenced by his ideas are seen by some as having had the effect of isolating poor communities in monolithic high-rises and breaking the social ties integral to a community's development. One of his most influential detractors has been Jane Jacobs, who delivered a scathing critique of Le Corbusier's urban design theories in her seminal work The Death and Life of Great American Cities.

    Le Corbusier deliberately created a myth about himself and was revered in his lifetime, and after death, by a generation of followers who believed Le Corbusier was a prophet who could do no wrong. But in the 1950s the first doubts began to appear, notably in some essays by his greatest admirers such as James Stirling and Colin Rowe, who denounced as catastrophic his ideas on the city. Later critics revealed his technical incompetence as an architect. In his book ArmÃ[​IMG]e du Salut, Brian Brace Taylor went into great detail about Le Corbusier's Machiavellian activities to create this commission for himself, his many ill-judged design decisions about building technologies, and the sometimes absurd solutions he then proposed

    Yup. Le Corbusier was to buildings as Haussmann was to cities.
     


  7. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    LeCorbusier is fine until you reach the multi-family housing scale. Most of his single function and single occupant buildings are pretty good, and a few are sublime. La Tourette is his biggest project that I don't dislike.
     


  8. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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  9. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    The Firminy church is brilliant. Of the 8 or 9 I've seen in person, it's the best.
     


  10. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    Yeah, but I'll bet the fried chicken isn't nearly as good.
     


  11. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    Colonel don't know shit bout this. I went on a partially cloudy day and the sun came from behind the cloud and the interior quickly lit up. [​IMG] Very special. [​IMG]
     


  12. mordecai

    mordecai Immoderator

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    I love that effect, but was it part of his design, or was it added? Seems kind of whimsical for Corbs.
     


  13. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    Some of LeCorbusier's original sketches did not have the perforations, but they were in the plans at different stages as LeCorbusier had intended. I'm not sure if the pattern is specifically one he came up with or not, but it's likely there was some sort of modification. I was told the concrete walls they built are a bit thinner than the ones that would have been technically feasible in the 70's, so they are either brighter or smaller than what was originally planned. You can tell they did a really good job constructing it. The joints are so much cleaner and the surface is smoother. The other buildings of his in Firminy are pretty shoddy.
     


  14. StephenHero

    StephenHero Black Floridian

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     


  15. alexanduh

    alexanduh Senior member

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    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]


    the bowling ball factory? [​IMG]
     


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