1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

The Anderson & Sheppard Expatriates Thread

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by voxsartoria, Jun 6, 2008.

  1. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,899
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    

    How did you get them to cut such a trim coat? Mine are all much more fully cut, although they are SCs. BTW, I know that's not you in the pic....
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2015
  2. Flake

    Flake Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    975
    Joined:
    May 4, 2011
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Heading to see Santa on Wednesday
     
  3. lordsuperb

    lordsuperb Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,387
    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    

    I clicked my heels three times then asked politely?
     
  4. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,899
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    

    I keep asking them to remove fullness from the chest. They'll fix it on the finished coat, then right back it comes on the next SC. I'll try clicking my heels next time though.....
     
  5. Butler

    Butler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    813
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Location:
    CPH
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2015
    4 people like this.
  6. flvinny521

    flvinny521 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    615
    Joined:
    Dec 2, 2011
    Location:
    Palm Beach, FL
    Great hair. Along with everything else.
     
    1 person likes this.
  7. MeachamLake

    MeachamLake Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    126
    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2014
    Location:
    United Kingdom
    I'm pleased to say that for my birthday I'm going to be getting a bespoke suit - my first one ever - from Steven Hitchcock...very excited to say the least!

    I was initially dead set on going to Anderson and Sheppard, but after seeing the quality of SH's work and finishing, particularly on Butler, I was sold. If I can look half as good as him, I'll be happy. [​IMG]

    I'll be looking to get cracking in the next few weeks once Steven returns from a trip to New York, so if anybody is interested I'll try keep a running diary of the experience. Now all I have to start doing is deciding exactly what I want...harder than it sounds![​IMG]

    Cheers! - D
     
    2 people like this.
  8. Tony Montana

    Tony Montana Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    150
    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2013
    Quote:
    Yes, please! [​IMG]
     
    2 people like this.
  9. loarbmhs

    loarbmhs Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    143
    Joined:
    Feb 6, 2012
  10. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,773
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    
    You're not the only one. Sometimes "rock of eye" makes you look the way the tailor wants you to look.
     
  11. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,565
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    

    I had them rein the drape in a touch on mine, but I don't get why you would go to Steed if you wanted something that lean. Their whole speciality is the drape cut.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  12. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,773
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    
    Many different flavors of drape. Steed, Mahon, Hitchcock (Jr) and Hitchcock (Sr) deliver very different-looking and -feeling jackets, even if they're all obviously not mainstream-traditional SR.

    There may be some technical choices involved--cut, construction, handling of the iron-- or it might just be what each cutter in his mind's eye thinks is possible and desirable for a given physique. Remember-- they're all varied heights and builds. What each sees in the mirror each morning and what he'd rather see will be different, and that will affect the clothes he dreams of making.
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
  13. jerrybrowne

    jerrybrowne Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,899
    Joined:
    Jul 29, 2009
    

    I like the drape cut, but for some reason, Steed has added so much volume to the chest in my paper pattern, and there is so little shape in the waist, that it adds 10-20 pounds. Looks much better once they fix the finished product which, frankly still has significant drape. I should say I am happy with the final product, especially the comfort. I wish they would just make the adjustments to my paper pattern so that we don't have to go through the song and dance every time....
     
    Last edited: May 2, 2015
    1 person likes this.
  14. Butler

    Butler Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    813
    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2009
    Location:
    CPH



    Very strange, as the tailor would normally add any changes from the last successful garment to the paper pattern - that's the whole point of it!
     
  15. VRaivio

    VRaivio Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,226
    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2011
    Location:
    Finland
    Alright, here's a quote about the rock-of-eye method from Mahon's current cutter's apprentice, Tom Ritson, who answered my interview a few years ago:

    Most cutters these days use a “block pattern,” a generic pattern that is manipulated according to the client’s measurements, taken from the first consultation. Rock-of-eye is an old cutter term for someone who does not draft a pattern for a client using a “block pattern”. They instead use the measurements and draft the pattern mostly free hand. There used to be many who cut in this way, although I think there are less of these gentlemen around these days. As I am learning this method, I can say that I am glad to be a pupil of it. The first time I saw Mr. Mahon use this method, as he has always done, I remember thinking “Wow, that will take 20 years for me to do that”…but with luck on my side, I’m aiming for less than ten.​
     
  16. patrickBOOTH

    patrickBOOTH Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    33,327
    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2006
    Location:
    New York City
    Yeah, I have interpreted it as a kind of "connect-the-dots" method. A few crucial dots placed on the fabric according to measurements taken and then free-handedly connecting them. I see nothing wrong with this method for a skeleton baste fitting, which is more for the tailor than anything else.
     
  17. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,565
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    Curious to know if any Steed customers here have also bought something from A&S? If so, how do the two compare?
     
  18. lordsuperb

    lordsuperb Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,387
    Joined:
    May 30, 2009
    

    I think @Manton had quite the episode with A&S.
     
  19. dieworkwear

    dieworkwear Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    7,565
    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2011
    

    Yes, but besides that.
     
  20. Concordia

    Concordia Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    5,773
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    
    I have DB and SB suits from both.

    While he is obviously of A&S background, what Edwin has done for me at Steed has a very different feel when worn, and a moderately (but noticeably) different appearance. Steed's trousers for me are more voluminous than what A&S does. Edwin also gives more space through the chest on all jackets, somewhat fatter lapels on SB, and altogether different front panels on DB, which are fairly flat and give oodles of space in the chest. Also for some reason, Ed places breast pockets (inside and out) lower than what I get from A&S.

    A&S DB clings more to my chest even when unbuttoned. I don't know if that is an issue of cut, pressing, sizing, or small personal judgments as it's all being put together, but if the Steed DB feels a bit like a cape, some of the A&S jackets look like a sports bra before I put it on. Even though the basic measurements are not all that different.

    Bear in mind that A&S has more than one cutter, so what I got started with John Hitchcock may not be exactly what you get when you walk in the door. Steed is based on Edwin (and maybe now his son). Hitchcock has much more of my build, while Edwin is rail-thin. So perhaps they brought different personal experiences of good tailoring to my body. Communication can also be more or less effective depending on who the client is, and that will affect how things evolve.

    To complicate things further, Edwin's first set of my measurements were made when I weighed more than I do today (and when I started with A&S before that). So the image he had of what I needed may have come from different raw material. And there may simply be someone at A&S whose style points more to Steed than Hitchcock. All reasons to avoid drawing too many trend lines through one datapoint.
     
    Last edited: May 14, 2015
    1 person likes this.

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by