Tee-shirt rehab

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Fabienne, Feb 24, 2005.

  1. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    I was about to throw away that plain black tee-shirt after splashing some hot oil on it while cooking, but decided to do an experiment. I used a spray bottle filled with bleach and I am quite happy with the results. The photos probably don't do it justice, but in person, the scenery is very much "cosmic". Anyhow, it's nothing new, I know and you can use bleach in other ways to alter the look of a fabric. Just thought I'd share my little weekend project. http://img186.exs.cx/img186/6109/tshirtjavel11mg.jpg http://img186.exs.cx/img186/1889/tshirtjavel29ot.jpg
     


  2. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    [​IMG] [​IMG]
     


  3. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Senior member

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    Very Diesel. Reminds me of my punk-ass days when I wore <cringe> cut-off twill shorts on which I purposely spilled bleach. Maybe they looked cool, I'm glad I don't have pictures [​IMG] Looked great with vans chukka boots or Half Cabs and a Bouncing Souls shirt. And lots of safety pins.
     


  4. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

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    Diesel clothing sucks. Anything you've done yourself, on the otherhand, is pretty cool, no matter how it looks. The problem with mass produced &quot;predistressed&quot; clothing is that you're just a clone of a different sort (Yeah, Diesel, GStar, GSus, Keanan Duffty, Ever, I'm looking at you. Libertine, Great Chin Wall and Cosa Nostra I'll give a pass for at least making one off pieces from real vintage garments). If you want the DIY look, you've got to pay for it with your own time and looks of hand sewing, imo.
     


  5. StevenRocks

    StevenRocks Senior member

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    Very nice. [​IMG]
     


  6. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Senior member

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    LA Guy, I always enjoy your tact, and pretty much agree. I dig their jeans, but the rest is throwaway. See bluefly and yoox stockpiles of Diesel crap.

    I haven't experimented with self-customizing clothing in awhile... Fabienne, you may have encouraged me to try it again. Safety pins, anyone?
     


  7. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    There's this one pair of Diesel cargo pants for women on their website that I wouldn't say no to... So, what else can you do to "self-customize"? Last night during dinner, the moon behind the clouds gave the sky gorgeous dark blue shades. I started imagining how I could reproduce that on a tee-shirt. [​IMG]
     


  8. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Just saw a picture of Domenico Dolce wearing a pair of jeans he had obviously attacked with a razorblade.

    Stefano Gabbana was next to him. They looked like they might easily be found on a scaffold outside a building...
     


  9. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Remove things - I often remove extraneous details that I don't like on various things, most recently I took off the gray elbow patches on a black sweater, because I thought they looked weird. You wouldn't notice it though, because now it just looks normal. However, it is mine. I always take off extra buttons and tags. Put better buttons on a shirt. Remove the collar button on a shirt whose collar you never button.

    Remove pockets, and put them on in other locations/orientations - this is a military thing as well, so it would go well on a mil-inspired piece. Remove the straight front pockets and put them on at an angle for better access, or cut one down and put it on the sleeve. Remove cargo pockets from pants and put them on angled, in a different place, or just leave them off.

    Cut the hems open on a pair of pants that don't fit right. Do a slit up one side and a bar tack across the top of the slit so it doesn't go too far. Or on a favorite pair of (casual) pants that have gotten too short, undo the hem and leave it unfinished, or finish it another way.

    Then there are the obvious things, dye, bleach, ink, paint, if you want a real worker jean look, caulk your bathtub and use your jeans to wipe off your finger. Fray some edges.
     


  10. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    More stuff, reminded by LA Guy's post: embroidery, patches, extra/reinforcing stitching, writing, stenciling.
     


  11. shoreman1782

    shoreman1782 Senior member

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    I would definitely do this more often if I was more confident in my sewing skills. And had a Bedazzler.
     


  12. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Originally Posted by Fabienne,Feb. 25 2005,05:04
    So, what else can you do to "self-customize"?
    Remove things - I often remove extraneous details that I don't like on various things, most recently I took off the gray elbow patches on a black sweater, because I thought they looked weird. You wouldn't notice it though, because now it just looks normal. However, it is mine. I always take off extra buttons and tags. Put better buttons on a shirt. Remove the collar button on a shirt whose collar you never button. Remove pockets, and put them on in other locations/orientations - this is a military thing as well, so it would go well on a mil-inspired piece. Remove the straight front pockets and put them on at an angle for better access, or cut one down and put it on the sleeve. Remove cargo pockets from pants and put them on angled, in a different place, or just leave them off. Cut the hems open on a pair of pants that don't fit right. Do a slit up one side and a bar tack across the top of the slit so it doesn't go too far. Or on a favorite pair of (casual) pants that have gotten too short, undo the hem and leave it unfinished, or finish it another way. Then there are the obvious things, dye, bleach, ink, paint, if you want a real worker jean look, caulk your bathtub and use your jeans to wipe off your finger. Fray some edges.
    Do you own a sewing machine? I've done things with hems, leaving them unfinished, etc., anything to lengthen them, as I am slim and if the fit is right around the waist, then the pants often look too short with high heels. Wouldn't removing the position of a pocket cause the fabric underneath to show a potential shade difference? Thanks for all the tips.
     


  13. Brian SD

    Brian SD Moderator

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    I might do this with some old PDCs that are torn up now. It would look so hot with my hairy white legs being visible to all.
     


  14. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    Yes, I got one for Christmas. I recently used it to severely recut a pair of BR pants that just looked wrong, and now they are one of my favorites. Particularly proud of the inside finish, which almost exactly matches the original. I'm still figuring it out though.
    I know what you mean. One of my next things to learn is extending a hem with added fabric inside, so I can make do with only 1/4 or 1/2" of material at the very bottom.
    If the garment has been washed/cleaned, or 'prewashed', then yes. That's part of the fun of it. If it's brand new, you can sometimes do it without a trace. If it's anything in between, I don't think I'd do it, because 'just a trace' looks kind of bad. If it shows, it has to look intentional. Edit: okay, I didn't completely recut the pants. But it was pretty serious.
     


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