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techniques/tools for moving heavy appliances? (i.e., gas range)

pg600rr

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I have a 36" Thermador pro range sitting in my garage waiting to be installed. My brother inlaw (who does plumbing) and myself are going to undertake the task tomorrow. However, I am not quite sure how to get it into the kitchen.

Thing weighs about 350 lbs. thankfully it only has to be moved up 2 steps and about 40 feet total. I just dont know what to use to move it.... I was thinking maybe something like these:
http://www.forearmforklift.com/

anyone used anything like this?
 

TGPlastic

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Lift with your legs. Maybe use a fridge dolly once it's over the steps. Straps might help too. Should you tack together a simple ramp or use some cheap plywood to cover good flooring? Up to you.
 

ms244

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You will need a Jbar or similar. Think a big lever! The one I have someone made from a 6' long piece of rebar. I've moved machinery up to about 4000 lbs with it. You'll also need some 1" diameter pipes and some wood blocks, some random chopped up 2x4s and 2x6s work great.
Use the bar to pry the edges of the oven so you can fit a couple of blocks underneath. Now slide the pipes underneath and roll it around. Just like the Egyptians did. When you get to the stairs. Make a ramp from some 2x6s and ease the oven on to that. Then slide the pipes underneath and roll it up. Try not to stand directly behind the oven since if it starts to go you don't want to get crushed by it. If the steps are small enough you might be able to block it up and not need the ramps. This is a standard way of moving heavy machinery. DON"T STICK YOUR HANDS UNDERNEATH WHEN LIFTING! Very important! Never place you hands underneath the load while its off the ground.
 

pg600rr

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^ thanks, that may work to the steps but prob. not when I get inside my house... seems like a good method for moving extremely heavy objects. I am more worried about moving it from my front door to my kitchen, and then in the final space where it needs to go, i.e., in the stove cutout in the island. I was hoping it would have some sort of wheels on it, to sort of shimmy, back it into its final resting space in the island. I didnt see this in the manual tho.

i am thinking 350 lbs. isnt really all that heavy for two grown men, I was hoping a method like the straps would be sufficient, 1. because they are cheap and easy to find, 2. no damaging my wood floors, and 3. seems like they offer percise and good manuverability...

it seems like the consensus so far is that those will not be sufficient for the stove though? I also didnt want to have to buy wood and make a ramp if I dont have to, I think we will give it a try with a dolly (from garage to steps) then straps (from there to kitchen). See how that works and try the method described above if needed.
 

impolyt_one

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there are plastic 'glider' pads that work fine for sliding appliances around. probably available everywhere.
 

acidboy

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hire a bunch of guys to do it. or check if you have a Hmong neighbor.
 

scarphe

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Originally Posted by pg600rr
^ thanks, that may work to the steps but prob. not when I get inside my house... seems like a good method for moving extremely heavy objects. I am more worried about moving it from my front door to my kitchen, and then in the final space where it needs to go, i.e., in the stove cutout in the island. I was hoping it would have some sort of wheels on it, to sort of shimmy, back it into its final resting space in the island. I didnt see this in the manual tho.

i am thinking 350 lbs. isnt really all that heavy for two grown men, I was hoping a method like the straps would be sufficient, 1. because they are cheap and easy to find, 2. no damaging my wood floors, and 3. seems like they offer percise and good manuverability...

it seems like the consensus so far is that those will not be sufficient for the stove though? I also didnt want to have to buy wood and make a ramp if I dont have to, I think we will give it a try with a dolly (from garage to steps) then straps (from there to kitchen). See how that works and try the method described above if needed.


350lb is not a lot for two men. honestly you do not need any equipment lift it, carry as far as possible and rest, repeat as needed. if you wish to protect you floor simply cover with path cardboard in case you have to rest.
 

Reggs

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I always just get a few of these, pitch them in the back of a truck and go home. They are very durable and a great value for $25 or so.

 

Thomas

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I have a couple of friends who used forearm forklifts to move washer, dryer, and fridge. Well, it was a friend and her boyfriend, and they had no trouble hoisting it up into her truck, either.

Me, I'd use a dolly and rope, or depending on what you're dealing with, a lot of movers use a flat 2x4 cart with casters on the bottom and carpet tacked to the top. Two of the casters are fixed, and the other two swivel (put the swivel casters on the same end, PLZ) and you can pretty well move anything anywhere. I did the same with some scrap MDF, actually.
 

pg600rr

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I picked up a couple of those sliders that someone mentioned above, they are rated for up to 1400 lbs. but I am still skeptical about slidding them across my wood floors and it not getting scratched... they look like they'll be very helpful for getting it in place.

Tried to locate some of those forearm straps today, but no luck.. I am going to call Uhaul in the a.m. to see if they rent them, hopefully get this thing in the house tomorrow!
 

globetrotter

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I've used a couple of old karate belts, basically anything like that that is about 2 inches wide and slightly padded or quilted.
 

Ben85

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Forearm forklifts are ok, a friend of mine has them. Just get a good dolly with rubber tires and you won't wreck your floor, plus getting up your two steps will be easy with two guys, unless you have the arms of 12 year old girls.
 

NorCal

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Originally Posted by scarphe
350lb is not a lot for two men. honestly you do not need any equipment lift it, carry as far as possible and rest, repeat as needed. if you wish to protect you floor simply cover with path cardboard in case you have to rest.

This.
Seriously, 40 feet aint shit. Even if you have to set it down a dozen times and rest 5 min after each time it will still only take an hour. If you want to get really slick get some sort of square thing with wheels to set it on. I've use a kids red wagon and a skate board when moving similarly heavy things recently.
 

pg600rr

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got it moved in, just ended up renting an appliance dolley.. it was actually quite easy, took all of 10 mins. I guess my worries were unwarranted...

With that said, got the old range all out and went to unhook the 12" flex line from the gas T shut off valve, and the joint wont budge! its only been togetehr for about 10 years, and it looks like its normal plumbers tape sealing it, but myself and my bro inlaw tried with plumbers wrenches for hours and no movement, even tried a bit of WD40 on it.
 

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