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Talking stocks, trading, and investing in general

Discussion in 'Business, Careers & Education' started by mikeman, Feb 2, 2011.

  1. stimulacra

    stimulacra Senior member

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    Dec 30, 2009
    What's new in the Rolex world? I lust after the Milguass green crystal and the Pepsi GMT Master.
     
  2. jbarwick

    jbarwick Senior member

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    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2012
    You can discuss all the stocks you want. If you are living off of your buffer and your largest holding is high risk, you must have a very high risk tolerance or would be ok enjoying cat food.
     
  3. Texasmade

    Texasmade Senior member

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    Apr 26, 2008
    Location:
    Houston, TX
    SS sports models are easy to get in the US except the Daytona. All SS sports models are impossible to get in the UK. Rest of Europe is tough but not impossible.

    Circle jerk for Rolex owners talking how they'd pick Rolex over other brands like AP or PP since Rolex is more sturdy, RO and Nautilus are scratch magnets, etc.
     
  4. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    In My Douchemobile
    Yup. Also, part of it has to do with the strategy to handle a certain deferred comp account I have and that's where the bond funds are being held.
     
  5. stimulacra

    stimulacra Senior member

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    Dec 30, 2009
    From the limited back testing I've done, it seems like 10% bonds would really only smooth over the rough patches, over any meaningful window I've seen, it doesn't dramatically affect upside performance too much.

    I'm at 25% bonds myself nowadays and you definitely see some dramatic deviation from an “all equity” benchmark.

    @effay I would flip those allocations in the other directions if it was me. 70% Index, 20% cash, 10% high risk stock. Nassim Taleb discusses “barbell strategy” in his book “Anti-fragile” that's of interest on how to balance ultra-high risk portfolios.
     
    Piobaire likes this.
  6. Piobaire

    Piobaire Senior member

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    In My Douchemobile
    Stim, thanks for the insight. This was more along the lines of getting my feet wet I think. From the research I've been able to find it looks like the average peak to trough for bear market is 15 months, and the average peak to trough to regaining the peak is about 40 months. That means I've actually got many years until this particular fund needs to be 100% in bonds and this was just to sort of get me used to not being 100% equity.
     
  7. UnFacconable

    UnFacconable Senior member

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    Jan 22, 2007
    Anyone else thinking about early retirement? Given how expensive it is where I live, my wife and I are semi-seriously considering getting out of the game and retiring to the mountains. Healthcare is the major expense-side wildcard, but I think if Obamacare was here to stay we would be good to go.

    We are unlikely to 100% retire because it's so easy these days to do remote work on a contract basis but if we forego certain luxuries (paying for the kids' education) I think we have enough. Also, given the current demand for professional services, we could probably make enough working 10 hours per week each (on average - I think the work would end up pretty choppy so I might have 100 hours one month and nothing the next) so that we wouldn't even need to touch our capital.

    I think the biggest hurdle for us is probably inertia. We like where we live and mostly think it's a good place for the kids to grow up. Not sure that taking them to a mountain town is what they would want if they were old enough to have an opinion. It's entirely possible that they would prefer life up the hill (I would have been cool with it as a kid) but I meet a lot of people who say they would have preferred to grow up where we live. Also we're still in our 30's, so I'm not sure how we model appropriate adult behavior when we are choosing a life of leisure. On the plus side, we have friends in the mountains so it would be a relatively easy transition and it's so much more affordable.

    We had previously been planning to wait until the youngest is in college to shut it down, but really wondering whether we should consider making a bold decision in the next few years.

    How does this relate to this thread? Two fold. First - I think if we're serious about early retirement we should probably do more to maximize our taxable accounts and getting serious about asset allocation because that's what we would be drawing from for 20 years. Second - Is the fact that I'm considering this really just another signal that we are at the top of the market? I probably wouldn't feel the same way if this were March 2009 and everything else was ceteris paribus.
     

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