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Talk to me about moth protection

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by TimelesStyle, Dec 27, 2010.

  1. Advent

    Advent Senior member

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    Suggestion: If you have a moth problem get your sweaters dry-cleaned and leave them inside (and seal it) the plastic wrapping that the dry-cleaner puts them in when returning them to you.

    As previously stated elsewhere here, moth balls and cedar are all worthless.
     
  2. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

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  3. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Senior member

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  4. forex

    forex Senior member

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  5. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    But is it bad to hang your suits in the original black unbretheable bags or not?

    I do that.
     
  6. forex

    forex Senior member

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    well,that's definitely bad,I don't know what kind of bags you are talking about but you need to air them our every now and then. I left the zipper open sometimes,I think that keeping them in bags is not going to help but I already have them in bags so what the hell. As stated in the thread,best thing is to dryclean them once a year and brush them after each wear.
     
  7. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    well,that's definitely bad,I don't know what kind of bags you are talking about but you need to air them our every now and then. I left the zipper open sometimes,I think that keeping them in bags is not going to help but I already have them in bags so what the hell. As stated in the thread,best thing is to dryclean them once a year and brush them after each wear.

    I do brush every wear, but it´s not been told that drycleaning destroys your suits?

    I use the black plastic bags with zipper that comes with the suits, per example those labelled Corneliani. I got 5 of those.

    Are bad?
     
  8. Kent Wang

    Kent Wang Senior member Dubiously Honored Affiliate Vendor

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    Why do clothes need to breathe?
     
  9. stubloom

    stubloom Senior member

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    This thread has taken so many twists and turns, that I thought it might be appropriate to quickly summarize and, in the process, answer some of the outstanding questions that relate specifically to the PREVENTION of moth damage: There are 3 critical issues associated with protecting your fine wools against moth damage. Just like the proverbial 3 legged stool, all 3 issues must be SIMULTANEOUSLY addressed to achieve peace of mind: 1. DRY CLEAN BEFORE YOU STORE AT THE END OF THE SEASON Wools that have been worn and then stored WITHOUT first being properly dry cleaned contain all the nutrition necessary to sustain life for the larvae of the female adult moth when they hatch. Remove that source of nutrition and you eliminate the likelihood that the female adult moth will seek out your garments as the perfect location to lay her eggs. For further information on this matter... Blog post: Protecting your fine woolens against moths. http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...nst-moths.aspx 2. STORE IN MATERIALS THAT ARE NOT ACIDIC IN NATURE Garments that have been cleaned prior to storing for the season should be stored in materials that are not acidic. Why? Because acidic materials degrade over time and off-gas (or release) acids. And when those acids come into physical contact with your garments, your garments could yellow and/or deteriorate. So now the question becomes: which materials are acidic? Practically every material that has be suggested as a solution in this thread. Specifically: * Nylon or vinyl zip-up suit bags that you got from your clothing retailer or tailor. These nylon or vinyl bags are not chemically inert (chemically inert materials to not degrade over time and off-gas acids). * Cotton zip-up suit bags with vinyl fronts. Cotton is great (see 3. below) but the vinyl is not chemically inert. * Thick canvas bags with vinyl fronts. Same point. * Dry cleaner plastic bags. Dry cleaner bags serve one function: to protect your garments from dust at the cleaners and while in transit to your home. Never store anything in dry cleaner bags unless you plan on wearing the garment in the short term. * Cedar everything (blocks, rings, hangers, oil, chests and even entire closets). Next to mahogany, there is no wood that's more acidic than cedar. For more information on the pros and cons of cedar..... Blog post: Protecting your fine clothes with cedar: the double edged sword http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...ged-sword.aspx * Polypropylene boxes (aka Rubbermaid or Sterilite). Not chemically inert. * Zip lock bags. Not chemically inert; same comment as dry cleaners bags. 3. ENSURE THAT ALL MATERIALS USED TO STORE GARMENTS ARE ABLE TO BREATHE All fabrics, both natural and synthetic, need to "breathe". Specifically, wools need to breathe during both short and longer term storage because wool is hydroscopic, meaning that wool has the ability to attract and absorb moisture from the air. At any point in time, anywhere from 5% to 50% of the WEIGHT of a wool garment is moisture, depending on the indoor and outdoor atmospheric conditions (think Florida vs Arizona in the summer). Care to speculate as to the possible outcome of storing your moisture-laden, Loro Piana cashmere sweater in an airtight plastic box or bag for a period of say 6 months? OTHER SUGGESTED PREVENTATIVE MEASURES A number of other measures that have been suggested are * Moth balls: Toxic; very difficult to remove the odors even with multiple dry cleanings; about as effective as a smelly tennis shoe; effective only when contained in an environment that is closed (violates principle #3 above). * Vigorous brushing after each wear and before storing for the season: Does nothing to remove the nutrients (body oil, perspiration and other organic matter) that are the food for the larvae when they hatch. * Steaming with a steamer: same as brushing; does nothing to remove the nutrients on which the larvae feed. For more information on the "wisdom" of steaming.... Blog post: The myth of pressing a garment with steam http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...ith-steam.aspx * Keeping your closets closed. No comment. Let's just say that this violates principle #3 above. SUMMARY Dry clean before you store for the season and store in breathable bags (sweater bags with snaps and suit and coat bags with zippers) made from chemically inert material -- either cotton or man made fibers. THE DRY CLEAN VS NO DRY CLEAN SMOKE SCREEN The "best" way to protect your fine wools against the possibility of moth damage is to clean before you store. The issue of the risk associated with poor dry cleaning and pressing IS A COMPLETELY SEPARATE ISSUE and should be separated from any discussion as to the "best" way to protect your fine wools. Yes, I know. Many of you don't trust dry cleaners to maintain your fine garments in pristine condition over the long term. You've had too many bad experiences. I know. I share your anguish. So much so, that I wrote this blog post in May 2010: Blog post: The 10 deadly sins of ordinary cleaners. http://ravefabricare.com/true-qualit...-cleaners.aspx That having been said, is the solution to avoid dry cleaning completely and risk potential damage to your fine garments? Or is the solution to find a skilled dry cleaner who knows how to care for fine garments, a skilled dry cleaner whose bread and butter is Attolini and not Abercrombie?
     
  10. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    The above post is great, but could you show non acid and proper suits bags please?

    I would like to know.

    What about a place with 90% humidity as me living in a mediterranean coast city?

    I prefer to keep my suits on those black suit bags but I don´t know a better way yet.


    Thanks
     
  11. forex

    forex Senior member

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    The above post is great, but could you show non acid and proper suits bags please?

    I would like to know.

    What about a place with 90% humidity as me living in a mediterranean coast city?

    I prefer to keep my suits on those black suit bags but I don´t know a better way yet.


    Thanks


    If you can find all canvass bags or cotton bags, they should do the job. Don't use any plastic or nylon bags,as suggested above. If you can't find any,just keep them without bags.
     
  12. ArtOrSartor

    ArtOrSartor Active Member

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    One word. Eight legs.

    Spiders.
     
  13. stubloom

    stubloom Senior member

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    SpallaCamiccia asks for pics of our breathable, acid-free bags. Pictured below are our very own RAVE FabriCARE 42 inch suit/sport coat bags. The specs are as follows: White; 42 inches x 24 inches; 90 gram; non-woven front and back; clear 12 inch wide 3 mil chemically inert plastic window on reverse side; white side zipper; 2 carry handles; can be folded in half to carry. In addition, we have Small sweater bags 14 x 11 Medium sweater bags 15 x 12 Large sweater bags 18 x 14 Coat/dress bags 60 x 24 Long dress bags 72 x 24 Evening gown bag 72 x 24 with 6 inch gusset flaring to 8 inches Bridal gown bag 72 x 24 with 6 inch gusset flaring to 20 inches For more information on all these bags, go to our website (Specialty Storage Products)..... http://ravefabricare.com/services/sp...y-storage.aspx For pictures of the 42 inch suit/sport coat bag referred to above, please click on the 2 links.... The front.... http://img35.imageshack.us/img35/166/dsc01823i.jpg The back.... http://img820.imageshack.us/img820/6946/dsc01822w.jpg Hope the pics help (no yet sure how to post them directly into the post so you don't have to click on the link).
     
  14. porcelain monkey

    porcelain monkey Senior member

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    When it comes to moths and other pests I generally turn to professionals - pest control professionals. The solution in my home is pheromone traps to catch the males and identify where the problem is and some sort of treatment of the problem. The current treatment is little disks that stick to the walls of closets and inside drawers where moths are. The females inhale the vapors and it disrupts their breeding cycle - like a birth control pill. It has worked wonders ... except ...

    Stubloom is going to have a fit about this, but the same pest control professional told me that dry cleaning is a double edged sword at best. A dry cleaner can be a moth paradise. Think of all the dirty, infested sweaters, suits, etc. that come through the doors and sit there in the same room amongst the clean clothes. I am told that clean wool is not immune at all, and have had newly cleaned and put away for the season items be quite moth eaten eaten while older, not recently cleaned items in the same closet are untouched. My deduction - the moths came from the cleaner. My pest control professional confirmed that this happens on a regular basis.

    The best way to keep moths out of your house is to identify the problem and treat it in your home.
     
  15. stubloom

    stubloom Senior member

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    Porcelain monkey: I know about as much about pest control as your pest control professional knows about dry cleaning. Your pest control professional should realize that you can't draw inferences about true quality cleaners based on a few hole-in-the-wall, filthy dry cleaners with whom he is personally acquainted. Maybe his inferences are drawn from the cleaner he uses to clean his uniform.
     
  16. TimelesStyle

    TimelesStyle Senior member

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    Porcelain monkey: I know about as much about pest control as your pest control professional knows about dry cleaning. Your pest control professional should realize that you can't draw inferences about true quality cleaners based on a few hole-in-the-wall, filthy dry cleaners with whom he is personally acquainted. Maybe his inferences are drawn from the cleaner he uses to clean his uniform.

    I agree with this. My cleaner, for example, doesn't even have the laundry or dry cleaning machine on-premises. Therefore, the only time my clean stuff spends around the dirty stuff is for the few hours after it's done being laundered until it makes its way back to her shop. In her shop, even if the clean stuff is in close proximity to the newly-delivered dirty stuff, the clean is in bags and would at the very least be harder for moths to get at.
     
  17. porcelain monkey

    porcelain monkey Senior member

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    Porcelain monkey: I know about as much about pest control as your pest control professional knows about dry cleaning. Your pest control professional should realize that you can't draw inferences about true quality cleaners based on a few hole-in-the-wall, filthy dry cleaners with whom he is personally acquainted. Maybe his inferences are drawn from the cleaner he uses to clean his uniform.

    I agree with this. My cleaner, for example, doesn't even have the laundry or dry cleaning machine on-premises. Therefore, the only time my clean stuff spends around the dirty stuff is for the few hours after it's done being laundered until it makes its way back to her shop. In her shop, even if the clean stuff is in close proximity to the newly-delivered dirty stuff, the clean is in bags and would at the very least be harder for moths to get at.

    I can't argue with either of you too much, but the fact remains that the only moth damage I have had in several years is on garments that came back from the cleaner and were hung in the closet for nine months. The moth traps did not catch a single male moth, so the infestation did not start there. I don't use a "hole-in-the-wall, filthy dry cleaner" either. In any event, I will now be using a new cleaner and will not automatically store freshly cleaned woolens without airing and brushing them first.
     
  18. stubloom

    stubloom Senior member

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    Porcelain monkey: Re-read my post. Carefully. I NEVER referred to your dry cleaner. Not even once. I think that it's pretty clear cut that I was referring to cleaners with which your PEST CONTROL PROFESSIONAL is familiar.
     
  19. porcelain monkey

    porcelain monkey Senior member

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    Porcelain monkey: Re-read my post. Carefully. I NEVER referred to your dry cleaner. Not even once. I think that it's pretty clear cut that I was referring to cleaners with which your PEST CONTROL PROFESSIONAL is familiar.

    I know you did not make a direct referral -- I was just making a point. It is my belief that I carried moth larva home from my cleaners, and they are a respectable, long-standing community business. Your inference was that my pest control guy is himself a bit dirty, with may be true, but he is someone who has seen it all, and a valuable reference in these matters.

    That aside, I would be very curious if others on this forum have suspected that moths have come home from their dry cleaner.
     
  20. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    Thanks for the links to your products, I'll study those when I get another computer, since mine did broke and I am in a public booth.

    My suit bags are more or less that this from Kiton, are those bad for suits?

    http://www.styleforum.net/showthread.php?t=217315

    Thank you
     

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