tailorng cashmere

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by masterpp, May 28, 2006.

  1. masterpp

    masterpp Well-Known Member

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    hey guys ive got a great gucci cashmere roll/polo neck sweater.

    but i cant wear it as the neck bit really annoys me. could a tailor just make it into a regular round neck for me. or would they ruin it
     
  2. Millerp

    Millerp Senior member

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    hey guys ive got a great gucci cashmere roll/polo neck sweater.

    but i cant wear it as the neck bit really annoys me. could a tailor just make it into a regular round neck for me. or would they ruin it



    Do you mean you want to turn a turtle neck into a crew neck?

    Tailors don't usually work with knits. Different trade.

    Perhaps a women's dressmaker who makes knit dresses could do it
    for you.

    You might be better off flipping it on ebay and getting a new crew neck.
     
  3. masterpp

    masterpp Well-Known Member

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    oh bugger. but are there such things as specialist cashmere tailors or something
     
  4. Tomasso

    Tomasso Senior member

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    oh bugger. but are there such things as specialist cashmere tailors or something

    Knitwear(cashmere or other) is a different animal. The finishing work found at the neckline, cuffs and hem are problematic for a tailor, best dealt with by a experienced knitter. Personally, I wouldn't waste my time or money.
     
  5. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    There are specialists who alter knits, but they cost a lot and this isn't the type of thing they typically do. They would have to deconstruct the whole collar and then knit you a whole new one, and by then you may as well buy yourself another sweater or two, since it would cost a ton if it could even be done.

    They are more useful for things like taking in the sides or sleeves of a sweater, reknitting moth holes, etc.
     
  6. The False Prophet

    The False Prophet Senior member

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    I've been wondering about this lately. I'm trying to get slim knitwear, but am, not to put too fine a point on it, appalingly narrow in parts. Even small size, slim fit models can be baggy.

    While some sweaters are seamless, others have overlocked seams at the side. I wonder, could these be trimmed fairly easily?

    I'd actually be prepared to drop the cash for MTM knitwear, as cashmere costs so much anyway. And a well-made blue or grey sweater is pretty well timeless. But, I'm not sure such thing exists...
     
  7. j

    j (stands for Jerk) Admin

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    I've been wondering about this lately. I'm trying to get slim knitwear, but am, not to put too fine a point on it, appalingly narrow in parts. Even small size, slim fit models can be baggy.

    While some sweaters are seamless, others have overlocked seams at the side. I wonder, could these be trimmed fairly easily?

    I'd actually be prepared to drop the cash for MTM knitwear, as cashmere costs so much anyway. And a well-made blue or grey sweater is pretty well timeless. But, I'm not sure such thing exists...

    I talked to one shop, and they can alter overlocked side seams or take them in by reknitting the seam. They are also able to remove cuffs and shorten sleeves, or do the same with the hem. The price depends on the fineness of the knit for the reknitting, and I think it is a relatively set price for re-overlocking the side seams and/or sleeves.
     

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