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SWD Discussion Thread for Tailoring

double00

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Sure, why wouldn’t it be? I’ve picked up some nice drawstring wool trousers from Zegna and Lardini. Nothing wrong with the baggy jacket. Not quite for me I guess but I consider it interesting.
because i can count ? there are four shoulders in that pic !

i'm not anti-anti-fit lol . i only wonder whether *tailoring* is now decoupled from *fit* . seems counterintuitive . in that case what makes tailoring , that the jacket turns out at the lapels and collar ? not sure .

serious question , is a kimono considered a tailored garment ? i've wondered this for some time .
 

FlyingMonkey

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i'm not anti-anti-fit lol . i only wonder whether *tailoring* is now decoupled from *fit* . seems counterintuitive . in that case what makes tailoring , that the jacket turns out at the lapels and collar ? not sure .

serious question , is a kimono considered a tailored garment ? i've wondered this for some time .
Come on, there is a whole swathe of highly tailored clothing that is carefully designed for silhouettes that do not fit the lines of the body in obvious ways, or is loose and oversized - go check out the Yohji thread for a relatively accessible example.

And yes, kimonos are tailored, atlhough very simple in their basic cut, and anti-fit, in the sense that for women at least they are designed to counteract the curves of the body and make an tubular silhouette.
 

mak1277

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I'm happy this thread exists. I find it a little odd that so many people who are theoretically interested in tailoring have totally quit wearing it because of changes in work dress codes. I mean, if you are into tailoring, why would you not continue to be into it regardless of what is worn at the office? So it's great to see tailoring in a more casual light.

For those of you who wear tailoring in non-office settings and/or more casually, do you care less about the rules of fit? I know @#dadcore once commented in the NMWA thread about being less concerned about sport coat length being perfect, since wearing a sport coat or suit is already seen as being odd. Are you all less concerned about "perfect" tailoring in the context in which you wear your suits and sport coats?
 

gdl203

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That’s an interesting question @mak1277

I feel that, in a way, those casual tailored looks almost benefit from an imperfect fit. It jibes better with the other elements of the outfit to have a slightly dropped shoulder, a looser trouser or an imperfect length. A perfectly fitting suit is actually harder to make it work in a more casual fit IMO
 

breakaway01

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That’s an interesting question @mak1277

I feel that, in a way, those casual tailored looks almost benefit from an imperfect fit. It jibes better with the other elements of the outfit to have a slightly dropped shoulder, a looser trouser or an imperfect length. A perfectly fitting suit is actually harder to make it work in a more casual fit IMO
Agree though there are also some nuances to making the casually imperfect fit look good. A worsted wool suit with overly long trousers or a short/tight jacket does not look good for example, so it's not just about imperfection.
 

pasadena man

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That’s an interesting question @mak1277

I feel that, in a way, those casual tailored looks almost benefit from an imperfect fit. It jibes better with the other elements of the outfit to have a slightly dropped shoulder, a looser trouser or an imperfect length. A perfectly fitting suit is actually harder to make it work in a more casual fit IMO
I understand and, on a given day, may be in concert with this idea. it seems to me to have major implications for buying tailored clothing:
-Properly fitting shoulders no longer are the sine qua non foundation for tailoring.
-Proper shirt sleeve length (i. e. sized:16-34), and jacket sleeve length, to allow a showing of cuff, becomes secondary.
-Jacket shaping and waist suppression becomes a much looser metric.
-Buying criteria broadens; thrifting to get top quality brands would likely increase, and hence potential access to top tier tailoring would broaden to a larger audience.
-Conversely, it would seem to me to be negative for manufacturers. Why buy new tailored clothing, if precise, "correct", fit is no longer highly valued; when the customer can get the same brand, materials, and construction quality for a small fraction of the price online?
 

bourbonbasted

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This whole train of thought goes back to my bespoke vs. RTW thought process. The imperfections of RTW just make for an easier, more casual air. There's also something to be said for a garment that is (or at least appears to be) well-worn. A "lived in look" seems ideal.

I did dig up an old picture of a "casual" bespoke suit from Rubinacci. The guy's name totally escapes me but the drape of the heavy linen juxtaposed with proportion play at the shoulders and waist make for a really cool effect. I might lower the rise a touch and/or tone done the styling theatrics but this is my platonic ideal of casual tailoring. Now to become 6'5" and thin...

 

Gus

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That’s an interesting question @mak1277

I feel that, in a way, those casual tailored looks almost benefit from an imperfect fit. It jibes better with the other elements of the outfit to have a slightly dropped shoulder, a looser trouser or an imperfect length. A perfectly fitting suit is actually harder to make it work in a more casual fit IMO
I agree with @gdl203 about the benefit of imperfection. This is where forgoing canvassing and linings, especially shoulder padding, would give a more relaxed, casual style. The "shacket" approach to suit construction.
 

mak1277

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I agree with @gdl203 about the benefit of imperfection. This is where forgoing canvassing and linings, especially shoulder padding, would give a more relaxed, casual style. The "shacket" approach to suit construction.
So you're OK losing the shaping effect of a structured jacket even if it's less flattering? I think that is ultimately where my question is/was heading.
 

kjb

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this is fun! i had to dig a bit to find some of these but i really do enjoy the casual suit. sage de cret always does really great set-ups / settos.

i'm surprised 18 East hasn't been mentioned yet as Antonio has done some really great "suits" in interesting fabrics / shapes.

lardini linen d/b
1643223129175.png


camoshita seersucker
1643223255735.png


SDC summer "suit"
1643223194712.png
 

Gus

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So you're OK losing the shaping effect of a structured jacket even if it's less flattering? I think that is ultimately where my question is/was heading.
I own two unconstructed cashmere jackets (no lining, no shoulder padding, no canvas). Both 3 patch pockets. One boxy and one a bit more fitted. I never thought they were less flattering (or I wouldn't have bought them), just less formal, more casual and easy to pack or wear for travel.
 

MrFingers

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I’ve tried a fair share of making my tailoring work in casual situations but honestly, anything that doesn’t have a collar just makes me feel like I’m trying to hard or like I’m being a poser. Polos and turtlenecks seem to work fine the way I try them:
EDDB9697-B39E-42CB-8B08-6BAA02E798E5.jpeg
C9AD79FE-C72C-4E42-9CCF-4942E034261D.jpeg
D46CFB51-EEC7-452D-B703-2F939A424158.jpeg


for “tshirts” I tried the anthology ones with “casual” summer looks but it just didn’t feel right to me. Probably due to indoctrination lol
 

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