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SWD Discussion Thread for Tailoring

gdl203

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Set Up (セットアップ) originally comes from a transliteration of the IT use of setup as in setup and installation. It is commonly found in all kinds of manuals and instructions for software and hardware including IKEA products, speakers, Windows installations, etc.

How it ended up as a term for fashion is rather nebulous as is so common with Japanese slang and jargon. If I'm not mistaken it was first used with women's clothing where matching tops and bottoms were/are sold as a set yet were too casual to be a suit which has a stricter definition. Eventually it made its way into men's fashion as well. See the following which is from a search for セットアップ on Zozotown, a major (fast fashion) online retailer.
View attachment 1742060
Note that the Japanese term can refer to clothing purchased separately or together.

The common definition is "Assembling/building top and bottom clothes" (服の上下を組み立てること). One website writing about "set up suits" said that whereas regular suits are the same size on top and bottom, requiring them to be altered, set up suits can be selected in different sizes without resizing. Jackets or bottoms can be sold separately as individual pieces or bought together should one want to do so. In casual wear set up means "coordinated upper and lower clothes". Apparently this applies to accessories sometimes as well when they are intended or able to be worn with matching outfits.

As to why the term 'set up' I can only guess. Just as Windows setup simplifies the installation process so do set ups simplify the dressing process, providing a quick and easy way to have a coordinated outfit ready to go with minimal effort. When shopping you are 'set up' to have a complete outfit ready to go out the door. One-stop shopping so to speak.

My apologies if any of the above is incorrect, please take it with a grain of salt. I am no expert and the origins of Japanese terms tend to be either idiot-proof or ridiculously confusing. For instance, if anyone could explain why pants breaks are called "cushion" (クッション) I would be much obliged.
that’s really interesting. I’ve always thought it was a derivative of “set”. As far as I remember, I’ve always heard my in-laws or wife refer to a matching set of clothes as “setto” (set). It could be matching bottom and top, but could also be matching crewneck and cardigan for example. Every time I hear the people at Ikiji or Fujito refer to matching pieces, that’s what I always hear: “setto” (set).
 

double00

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Set Up (セットアップ) originally comes from a transliteration of the IT use of setup as in setup and installation. It is commonly found in all kinds of manuals and instructions for software and hardware including IKEA products, speakers, Windows installations, etc.

How it ended up as a term for fashion is rather nebulous as is so common with Japanese slang and jargon. If I'm not mistaken it was first used with women's clothing where matching tops and bottoms were/are sold as a set yet were too casual to be a suit which has a stricter definition. Eventually it made its way into men's fashion as well. See the following which is from a search for セットアップ on Zozotown, a major (fast fashion) online retailer.

Note that the Japanese term can refer to clothing purchased separately or together.

The common definition is "Assembling/building top and bottom clothes" (服の上下を組み立てること). One website writing about "set up suits" said that whereas regular suits are the same size on top and bottom, requiring them to be altered, set up suits can be selected in different sizes without resizing. Jackets or bottoms can be sold separately as individual pieces or bought together should one want to do so. In casual wear set up means "coordinated upper and lower clothes". Apparently this applies to accessories sometimes as well when they are intended or able to be worn with matching outfits.

As to why the term 'set up' I can only guess. Just as Windows setup simplifies the installation process so do set ups simplify the dressing process, providing a quick and easy way to have a coordinated outfit ready to go with minimal effort. When shopping you are 'set up' to have a complete outfit ready to go out the door. One-stop shopping so to speak.

My apologies if any of the above is incorrect, please take it with a grain of salt. I am no expert and the origins of Japanese terms tend to be either idiot-proof or ridiculously confusing. For instance, if anyone could explain why pants breaks are called "cushion" (クッション) I would be much obliged.
so maybe another transliteration of 'set up' might be *module* (not suggesting that use just cornering the idea of 'setup' as it's being described) but essentially these are separates that match ?
 

bourbonbasted

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Dug into the Twitter machine archives for some examples of "casual tailoring." These examples all skew more trad/CM and in hindsight are pretty formulaic (nominate me for the No Belt Peace Prize). The rumpled, un-pressed look rules the day.

Jackets are: Attolini (cashmere), Steed (bamboo), Attolini (wool), Zegna (cashco corduroy). Pents are all linen/cotton blends by Incotex (aside from the denim). Tees are Velva Sheen, polo is Ascot Chang, OCBD is custom.

caz1.jpg


caz2.jpg


caz3.jpg


caz4.jpg
 

Gus

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At Pitti I purposely left the ties at home, as much as I love them (and still think they look good when appropriate). But I’m finding that many are beginning to embrace the suit as something that can be worn more casually, something I’m 100% behind.
I especially enjoyed the recent photos of your various Pitti outfits because of this. Well done @UrbanComposition

I find myself only wearing scarves, neckerchiefs, knit polos and rollnecks with tailored jackets. Wearing a tailored jacket with a plain dress shirt and no tie can often look a little more "office casual" compared to the more overall stylish casual approach of scarves or knits under a jacket IMO.
 
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sipang

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Always love Lemaire stuff though I don't own any. Curious about can "normal CM stuff" creates the similar vibe of this look.
e.g. unpadded shoulder sport coat, regular cut/ not flared trousers, open neck crisp shirt
Judging from the picture alone that sport coat strikes me as an extremely normal CM-looking thing actually (I wouldn't call the shoulder unpadded exactly...). Though this being Lemaire there might be more than meets the eye and it's also possibly ventless.

Regardless, goes to show what thoughtful styling can do for you.
 
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OccultaVexillum

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Yeah the shoulder was lightly padded, it had a center vent. The wool/poly blazers that season were "inspired by" the suits Nick Cave wore around the 80s.
 

dieworkwear

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Always love Lemaire stuff though I don't own any. Curious about can "normal CM stuff" creates the similar vibe of this look.
e.g. unpadded shoulder sport coat, regular cut/ not flared trousers, open neck crisp shirt
To me, that outfit has a sleazy, low-brow vibe. I think that comes through the square, slightly padded shoulders and flared trousers, and obviously the low-cut t-shirt.

If you were to do that with normal CM stuff (soft natural shoulder and slim-straight pants), I would maybe try a silky shirt (e.g. Wythe's Tencel Western shirt), thin belt (maybe 3 piece Western buckle), and some jewelry. And maybe try something like side-zip boots.
 

1969

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I wouldn't call it tailoring, but I find myself doing this kind of thing frequently. Knits under an unstructured jacket with jeans and sneakers.
I've got ones from Schneider, Oliver Spencer, EG and Boglioli but still don't feel like I've hit on my ideal jacket yet.
 

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RegisDB9

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Judging from the picture alone that sport coat strikes me as an extremely normal CM-looking thing actually (I wouldn't call the shoulder unpadded exactly...). Though this being Lemaire there might be more than meets the eye and it's also possibly ventless.

Regardless, goes to show what thoughtful styling can do for you.
Speaking of this fit who makes a slightly slutty T like the one on this fit? TF had a great silk one but it sold out at the Miami boutique and can’t find another. They are perfect to wear under jackets
 

conceptual 4est

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Poked on my phone to find a few examples from this past summer / fall. I was living out of a suitcase for this period so it's pretty limited stuff, and mostly just that same tonal navy seersucker Camoshit one.

05A32266-247C-4B4E-ADAD-D5A17CD6151C.jpeg

Band collar shirt and loagers

2742A25E-1E64-4110-894D-A8ADD3074DB6.jpeg

Easy pants with a printed blazer and paper tee. The jacket is part of a set / "setto" like @gdl203 mentioned above. That's always the way I had heard it in my ears, too. This one has matching shorts but both are good to wear separately. Kind of how Engineered Garments makes a bunch of designs in the same fabrics each season.

653B0CAF-A0FC-41DE-B751-7B9FAC6CE6C4.jpeg

Cotton/Silk seersucker jacket with some easy pants and a terrycloth tee. The jacket is part of a full suit that I also like to wear separately.


5D3968A9-9228-4C58-87EF-7DD0A1539F31.jpeg

Doppiaa jacket, merino wool tee, and those Camoshita seersucker suit trousers.

19AA2143-B2F6-49DD-9379-D7BC2CC3C5F9.jpeg

The tee in questions

B4F72A0F-E71B-4A49-8850-C12009D9AB6D.jpeg 8BB164E6-925D-43A8-BEC4-7B0DADE6338C.jpeg

Full suit with Inis Meain linen crewneck sweater

0664C66D-49FA-4206-BCDC-9D836D343BEB.jpeg

Same suit with a band collar floral shirt


4D60C49B-F38C-4715-A241-40A3E6399AF9.jpeg


Same suit with a Kimber knit polo and raffia slippers

7443A749-7662-47D1-B577-D759F3DECADD.jpeg

Not mine but trying things on - brown Camoshita corduroy DB suit with mockneck sweater and sneakers
 
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dieworkwear

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Love all those fits. Who makes the t-shirts that you wear with tailored clothing? Are there certain colors, materials, or brands you prefer over others?
 

whorishconsumer

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This is as formal as it gets for me. I’ve been dipping into very-high-rise with these (Berg and Berg) trousers and a pair of single-pleat Stoffas. Both constantly threaten to fall down.

Please disregard the mirror, which will be shattered with a hammer the minute I receive my Georg.

BCA3919E-C9DE-4237-B86B-D98E44A26295.jpeg


Armoury Model 3
Gitman x Frans Boone
Berg and Berg
Rubato belt
Yuketen
 
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bourbonbasted

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is this an old styleforvm joke from an era I missed or did you come up with it just now?

in any event I can't stop giggling
It’s actually an old hockey chirp we used when guys showed up to the rink in their game day suit sans-belt. Glad to be of service.
 

Gus

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This Camoshita navy seersucker suit worn without a tie and mixed with tee's, non-dress shirts, is an ideal casual travel suit and look IMO.You can mix it with just about anything else in your suitcase.(I wish the Camoshita would have fit me. Anyone know where I can get a navy seersucker suit?)


Poked on my phone to find a few examples from this past summer / fall. I was living out of a suitcase for this period so it's pretty limited stuff, and mostly just that same tonal navy seersucker Camoshit one.

View attachment 1742591
 
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