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Sustainable Menswear?

Don'sStyle

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What's up styleforum?! I'm a new member and happy to have found this space.

I'm a classic menswear type of guy (don't love chasing trends), but always love good essentials. I'm really interested in finding menswear brands that build sustainability into the foundation of their brand and trying to make this world a better place. Anyone found good brands for this? Most of the brands that I see that are working hard towards sustainability tend to be outdoor or surf brands.

I've seen Taylor Stitch, and think they do good work in sustainability, but their aesthetic is a bit "mariner" for me. Any recommendations?
 

vdubiv

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anything made with bamboo
 

Don'sStyle

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anything made with bamboo
from the research I've done, bamboo comes with it's own issues as well as it takes a ton of chemicals to break down the bamboo into useable fiber for fashion implementation. Plus most of the brands that I've seen with bamboo have been a bit "crunchy".
 

Panama

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Any brand that promotes Merino wool. They all have a great mission statement to save the world and oceans.
 

vdubiv

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lol crunchy? I'm guessing that was a joke, not sure, my only experience with bamboo admittedly is with socks and they are not crunchy.
 

vdubiv

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Any brand that promotes Merino wool. They all have a great mission statement to save the world and oceans.
what does wool have to do with the ocean?
 

TheShetlandSweater

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What's up styleforum?! I'm a new member and happy to have found this space.

I'm a classic menswear type of guy (don't love chasing trends), but always love good essentials. I'm really interested in finding menswear brands that build sustainability into the foundation of their brand and trying to make this world a better place. Anyone found good brands for this? Most of the brands that I see that are working hard towards sustainability tend to be outdoor or surf brands.

I've seen Taylor Stitch, and think they do good work in sustainability, but their aesthetic is a bit "mariner" for me. Any recommendations?
I don't know of many brands that emphasize sustainability, but if you want to buy clothes in a responsible way, below are some basic points of advice. (I should also say that I imagine many of the brands discussed on here are more sustainable in virtue of (a) not making clothing drastically in excess of what they expect to sell, (b) not pushing trends that encourage disposing of old clothes that are still perfectly wearable, and (c) being made in countries where certain environmental restrictions are tighter.)

1) Don't buy on sale. People often buy things on sale that they wouldn't otherwise buy. This leads to over-consumption. If you buy things only at full price, you are more likely to buy things you will actually like and wear for the lifetime of the garment.

2) Don't chase trends. Again, this leads to overconsumption. Buy things that you can wear for the duration of the lifetime of the garment.

3) Don't buy unusual things. Again, you might buy things you won't wear.

4) Wait a few weeks between becoming interested in a particular item and actually buying said item. People often buy things they don't need because their emotions get the better of them. If you wait a few weeks after becoming interested in something, your interest will often wain and you will realize that you don't actually need that item like you thought you did. If you are still interested in said item after a few weeks, it is more likely that it fits a genuine wardrobe need.

5) Find your style. Buy clothes in that style. If you stick to one aesthetic and know what you like, you will be better at buying things you will actually wear. If you change your style after five years, you will need to buy a whole new wardrobe and that is certainly not sustainable.

6) Buy more durable items. Buy items that can be repaired. Buy two pairs of trousers with your suits (if you wear suits).
 

Don'sStyle

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I don't know of many brands that emphasize sustainability, but if you want to buy clothes in a responsible way, below are some basic points of advice. (I should also say that I imagine many of the brands discussed on here are more sustainable in virtue of (a) not making clothing drastically in excess of what they expect to sell, (b) not pushing trends that encourage disposing of old clothes that are still perfectly wearable, and (c) being made in countries where certain environmental restrictions are tighter.)

1) Don't buy on sale. People often buy things on sale that they wouldn't otherwise buy. This leads to over-consumption. If you buy things only at full price, you are more likely to buy things you will actually like and wear for the lifetime of the garment.

2) Don't chase trends. Again, this leads to overconsumption. Buy things that you can wear for the duration of the lifetime of the garment.

3) Don't buy unusual things. Again, you might buy things you won't wear.

4) Wait a few weeks between becoming interested in a particular item and actually buying said item. People often buy things they don't need because their emotions get the better of them. If you wait a few weeks after becoming interested in something, your interest will often wain and you will realize that you don't actually need that item like you thought you did. If you are still interested in said item after a few weeks, it is more likely that it fits a genuine wardrobe need.

5) Find your style. Buy clothes in that style. If you stick to one aesthetic and know what you like, you will be better at buying things you will actually wear. If you change your style after five years, you will need to buy a whole new wardrobe and that is certainly not sustainable.

6) Buy more durable items. Buy items that can be repaired. Buy two pairs of trousers with your suits (if you wear suits).
Love all of this! Thanks for your input. I tend to shop this way as it is, definitely a way to lower your impact.
 

Panama

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I don't know of many brands that emphasize sustainability, but if you want to buy clothes in a responsible way, below are some basic points of advice. (I should also say that I imagine many of the brands discussed on here are more sustainable in virtue of (a) not making clothing drastically in excess of what they expect to sell, (b) not pushing trends that encourage disposing of old clothes that are still perfectly wearable, and (c) being made in countries where certain environmental restrictions are tighter.)

1) Don't buy on sale. People often buy things on sale that they wouldn't otherwise buy. This leads to over-consumption. If you buy things only at full price, you are more likely to buy things you will actually like and wear for the lifetime of the garment.

2) Don't chase trends. Again, this leads to overconsumption. Buy things that you can wear for the duration of the lifetime of the garment.

3) Don't buy unusual things. Again, you might buy things you won't wear.

4) Wait a few weeks between becoming interested in a particular item and actually buying said item. People often buy things they don't need because their emotions get the better of them. If you wait a few weeks after becoming interested in something, your interest will often wain and you will realize that you don't actually need that item like you thought you did. If you are still interested in said item after a few weeks, it is more likely that it fits a genuine wardrobe need.

5) Find your style. Buy clothes in that style. If you stick to one aesthetic and know what you like, you will be better at buying things you will actually wear. If you change your style after five years, you will need to buy a whole new wardrobe and that is certainly not sustainable.

6) Buy more durable items. Buy items that can be repaired. Buy two pairs of trousers with your suits (if you wear suits).
I only buy on sale...
 

TheShetlandSweater

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I only buy on sale...
I buy on sale some too, but I try to be careful about what I buy on sale. For example, I know I like Shetland sweaters. If I see some from a maker I like go on sale in my size, I may buy one, but I know I will wear it, because I know I wear Shetlands a lot and have gotten to a point where I am good at not buying things I don't wear.
 

Panama

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So did your mom
My Mom died when I was two. So I can't confirm it. But my Great Aunt who raised me loved a sale. Black Friday would be her favourite if she hadn't died in 1981. After that I was sent to an orphanage...
 

JFWR

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I would say that buying good quality shoes count as sustainable, owing to the fact that you're likely to own these shoes for 20+ years and not just chuck them into the landfill within 1 year of wear. I don't buy low-quality shoes anymore to avoid waste and because they fit/feel/look better.

I'd say quality purchases are inherently more sustainable as you buy less, repair more, and wear longer.
 

usctrojans31

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I don't know of many brands that emphasize sustainability, but if you want to buy clothes in a responsible way, below are some basic points of advice. (I should also say that I imagine many of the brands discussed on here are more sustainable in virtue of (a) not making clothing drastically in excess of what they expect to sell, (b) not pushing trends that encourage disposing of old clothes that are still perfectly wearable, and (c) being made in countries where certain environmental restrictions are tighter.)

1) Don't buy on sale. People often buy things on sale that they wouldn't otherwise buy. This leads to over-consumption. If you buy things only at full price, you are more likely to buy things you will actually like and wear for the lifetime of the garment.
I could not disagree more with this phrasing. Pedantic, perhaps, but it should read "don't buy something just because it's on sale."

If you are planning on buying a new sofa from Blu Dot and you know that Blu Dot marks down its entire collection by 20% for the month of October — its only sale of the year — why the heck would you buy your sofa in September if you could wait?
 

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