Summer suits that can be worn in the winter?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by mafoofan, Oct 16, 2009.

  1. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Get the bases covered with 9-month suits and keep an overcoat or a warm flannel blazer handy during the winter until your wardrobe is built up.

    'Course winter's not that big of a deal around these parts, so it's easy for me to talk about it...


    This is the absolute opposite of what I want to do. Three-season or 9-month cloth tends to be really boring to me, and won't work well in the summer.
     


  2. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    A lot depends on your tolerance for heat and cold. I personally cannot wear 9/10 in real heat, but many people can. 8/9 is more bearable.

    There are many tropical worsteds that look simply like "business suits" with no seasonal connotation at all, but the light weight makes them perfect for summer. The Lesser tropical book is ideal, as was the late, lamented Minnis Rangoon.
     


  3. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    There are many tropical worsteds that look simply like "business suits" with no seasonal connotation at all, but the light weight makes them perfect for summer. The Lesser tropical book is ideal, as was the late, lamented Minnis Rangoon.

    Isn't that stuff really delicate and flimsy feeling?
     


  4. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    So far, it apears that 8-9 oz. fresco would fit the bill since it is easily wearable in the summer, but won't look teribly out of place during the winter.
    Which is all fine and dandy, but a NY winter will cut through it like a hot knife through butter. It also doesn't drape as well as its heavier brethren, creases a lot easier, and if you get a full lining to improve on those 2 characteristics, you defeat the purpose of fresco. Anyway, FWIW, have a look at the Frontier, and maybe Mersolair and Firefly bunches.
     


  5. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    Which is all fine and dandy, but a NY winter will cut through it like a hot knife through butter.
    This is true. On Tuesday, I wore a Harrisons Mystique cloth which is like the Frontier but 8-9 oz weight and I was warm and yesterday I wore a regular twill weave cloth in 11/12 oz and I was cold. One needs a variety in NYC.
     


  6. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Which is all fine and dandy, but a NY winter will cut through it like a hot knife through butter.

    It also doesn't drape as well as its heavier cousins, creases a lot easier, and if you get a full lining to improve on those 2 characteristics, you defeat the purpose of fresco.

    Anyway, FWIW, have a look at the Frontier, and maybe Mersolair and Firefly bunches.


    I understand the comfort and wear compromises. My chief concern is with looking reasonably seasonable, despite wearing a summer cloth in the winter. Eventually, those summer suits will only be worn in the summer.
     


  7. apropos

    apropos Senior member

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    I understand the comfort and wear compromises. My chief concern is with looking reasonably seasonable, despite wearing a summer cloth in the winter. Eventually, those summer suits will only be worn in the summer.
    OK.

    In that case, I would advocate for the 9/10 oz frescos - there is one in a beautiful dark blue-gray mix that will complement your skin tone very well, the reference number escapes me now (0520?).

    And get an overcoat made.
     


  8. Film Noir Buff

    Film Noir Buff Senior member

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    OK. In that case, I would advocate for the 9/10 oz frescos - there is one in a beautiful dark blue-gray mix that will complement your skin tone very well, the reference number escapes me now (0520?). And get an overcoat made.
    Heh, I spoke too soon. Fresco looks terrible whatever season it's worn in.
     


  9. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Isn't that stuff really delicate and flimsy feeling?

    No. And it looks more polished than fresco, less seasonally summer.
     


  10. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Some Minnis Fresco in 8/9 oz.:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    Apparently, these are lighter in real life. The middle one is supposed to be blue.
     


  11. MrBon

    MrBon Well-Known Member

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    Are there any cloths appropriate for the summer (fresco, mohair, linen, etc.) that would make a summer suit appropriate for business that can also be worn during the winter? Suppose that you are willing to stomach the cold and only care about appearances.


    Depending on your tolerance to cold weather, i would say color is more important than fabric when it comes to wearing a summer suit in the winter. Your white, tan, light blue, beige, cream, yellow, and so on... look a little out of place come Xmas, January and February.

    Stick with darker shades and you'll never look out of place.
     


  12. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Foo, please listen.

    If you want a summer cloth that looks LEAST like a summer cloth, and that can be worn in other seasons not because it is warm but because it does not LOOK like it belongs only in summer, then you are much better off with a plain weave four-harness tropical than with an open weave fresco.

    This is not really debatable.

    Also, an added advantage is that the tropical will not be quite as permeable to wind.
     


  13. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Foo, please listen.

    If you want a summer cloth that looks LEAST like a summer cloth, and that can be worn in other seasons not because it is warm but because it does not LOOK like it belongs only in summer, then you are much better off with a plain weave four-harness tropical than with an open weave fresco.

    This is not really debatable.

    Also, an added advantage is that the tropical will not be quite as permeable to wind.


    I guess I'm not being clear. I want to get something as summery as possible, without looking stupid silly wearing it in the winter (no cream linen, sadly), because it will eventually become a summer-only suit. I don't like the tropical worsteds precisely because they look so season-anonymous.
     


  14. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Well, the 8/9 fresco feels and wears a lot flimsier than tropical. In heat, when there is less wind, the difference in coolness is not so great, but with a cold wind, the fresco will feel freezing. Not sure this is such a great idea.
     


  15. mafoofan

    mafoofan THE FOO Dubiously Honored

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    Well, the 8/9 fresco feels and wears a lot flimsier than tropical. In heat, when there is less wind, the difference in coolness is not so great, but with a cold wind, the fresco will feel freezing. Not sure this is such a great idea.

    Hmm, okay. I just hear you guys rave about how awesome fresco is for the summer, and I don't have any summery suits. I like the slightly rough-looking, nubby texture of fresco. Tropical worsteds are just a little boring to me.

    Eventually (years down the line), I'd like to wind up with a flannel-heavy winter suit wardrobe and a fresco/linen-heavy summer suit wardrobe.
     


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