Suitings by season

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by montecristo#4, May 26, 2005.

  1. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Senior member

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    Can anyone give me a run down on how they think fabric weight correlates to utility (and fashionability) in terms of seasons?

    e.g. 10 oz -- okay all year round

    Thanks.
     


  2. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    For wool, 12 oz for cool and cold seasons. Tailors well and holds its shape with a little steaming.

    13-14oz. is about the most you can wear comfortably in a heated office. Country suits. Tailor very well in the English style.

    10 oz for shoulder seasons or a moderate climate like San Fracisco but the wrinkles take longer to fall out (I wear 11 oz in downtown SF for most of the year).

    8oz is considered tropical. Takes a long time for wrinkles to fall out.

    As exceptions to that advice, the better linens for summer are 14 oz. The wrinkles fall out better and they are porous enough to keep you cool.

    And a fabric called fresco is ideal for summer. Also very porous. 10oz. is an effective weight.
     


  3. Stu

    Stu Senior member

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    Is there anywhere on the tag inside the jacket that would what the weight is?
     


  4. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    There is a tag on most swatch books that states the weight of the swatches inside.

    The information is rare on ready to wear, but once your fingers learn the feel of the various weights you won't need tags.
     


  5. esvoboda

    esvoboda Well-Known Member

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    Is there any relation between weight and terms like "Super 100's", "Super 120's", etc.?
     


  6. Will

    Will Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Those terms refer to the diameter of the wool used. The higher the number, the lighter the cloth, the more expensive, and the worse wearing.

    Some may disagree with me but Anderson & Sheppard told me years ago that nothing heavier than Super 100 tailors well.

    Super 180s are for men who wear a bespoke suit once and give it to one of the staff.
     


  7. montecristo#4

    montecristo#4 Senior member

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    You nothing higher in Super number than Super 100 tailors well?
     


  8. Manton

    Manton RINO Dubiously Honored

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    Not exactly.  The higher the number, the thinner the individual fibers.  But even high-number (.i.e., small micron) yarns can be woven into thick cloth.  It is not often done because it does not sell.  The men who want Super 180s want wool that feels like a combination of cashmere and silk, and that weighs almost nothing.  But a few companies (Lesser, for intance) carry 120s and 150s of considerable heft.

    That said, I generally agree that the higher you go, the harder the Supers are to tailor, and the worse it wears.  In general.  I don't think there is a clear cut-off point, however, because so much depends on other factors -- quality of the raw wool, length of individual yarns, weaving, finishing, etc. I've seen 120s that would do fine, and 100s that would be awful. I've also seen 80s that feel fantastic.
     


  9. alchimiste

    alchimiste Senior member

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    It would have been convenient if threadcount had been the ultimate indication of good cloth. I would have felt less clueless looking at swatches.
     


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