Suit press?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Stavebomb, Dec 4, 2011.

  1. Stavebomb

    Stavebomb Member

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  2. a tailor

    a tailor Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    forget the press, and get some press cloth.
    BARE IRON ON YOUR SUIT IS A NO NO!
     


  3. lostron

    lostron Senior member

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    don't get that machine.. Apply light steam or let a professional cleaner handle it.
     


  4. Sanguis Mortuum

    Sanguis Mortuum Senior member

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    You should never iron a suit, only press it. This can still be done with an iron, the difference being that when 'ironing' something you move the iron over the fabric while it is in contact, whereas when 'pressing' you only press down with the iron but lift it off the fabric to move it. And, as 'a tailor' says, always use a press cloth between the iron and the fabric. When pressing you will also want to use some form of buck in various areas to make sure you keep them in the original shape instead of pressing everything flat, and make sure to apply sufficient pressure to conserve the original ironwork.
     


  5. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

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    +1.
    I use a handkerchief and have never had a problem...
     


  6. jamesny

    jamesny Senior member

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    use a steam iron or just have it pressed at the cleaners after
     


  7. Stavebomb

    Stavebomb Member

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    Thanks for all of the good insight. You would think that the staff at Brooks Brothers might mention that to me, seeing as I am 24 and might appear less than well-seasoned in suit care. Oh well, you live and your learn! Is an old t-shirt suitable to use as a press cloth, or would you recommend purchasing a specialty product?
     


  8. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

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    I use a handkerchief and have never had a problem...
     


  9. RDiaz

    RDiaz Senior member

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    I use an old shirt, a piece of sheet or a pillow cover. An old t-shirt isn't consistent enough...
     


  10. a tailor

    a tailor Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    go to a local fabric store and purchase one yard of all cotton drill. thats about 6 bucks . some stores have discount coupons in the newspaper. toss the drill in the laundry to get it ready for use. this is what most tailors use for pressing.
    cut on strip 10 inches wide and full length for pressing trouser creases. cut another smaller one for jacket
    fold the rest of it and file it away for future use.
    you now have what for most people, is a life time supply of press cloth.
     


  11. dah328

    dah328 Senior member

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    It's not really reasonable to blame the BB salesman for not giving you a run-down on the proper method of pressing a suit.
     


  12. Stavebomb

    Stavebomb Member

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    I never blamed anybody for me ironing my suit. I simply brought up the idea that when you buy a suit of quality, the sales people should probably offer a higher degree of customer service than a place of business that sells lesser quality garments. Not everyone has years and years of suit care knowledge. All it says on the tag is dry clean only... Why would I think its harmful to iron clothing if I otherwise had no prior knowledge? Not sure why I would think that, as most salesmen i have encountered are the same, and all they want to do is sell a product and tell you it looks beautiful even though it often times does not.
     


  13. ter1413

    ter1413 Senior member

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    i doubt a sales rep woult tell u that. you should have asked. bb will think that you already know how to maintain...
     


  14. Stavebomb

    Stavebomb Member

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    Given the context, any prudent individual would have queued in to the fact that I was unknowledgeable with regards to suits and suit care. When asked my jacket size I responded, "I don't know." That should have been a pretty good giveaway.
     


  15. viator

    viator Senior member

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    Sorry, you're just not right about this. When you buy shoes, they don't tell you, "Hey, don't go stomping around in salty slush with these, OK?" It's not the SA's job to give you a primer on basic suit maintenance just because in your mind it's obvious you don't know what you're doing. You don't have anything to be embarrassed about here - it's a mistake anybody could make when they don't know a lot about suits - but let's not try to make it out to be someone else's failing, either.

    And on top of that, I'll bet you most people never press suits, they wear them a few times and then send them to the cleaners.
     


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