1. And... we're back. You'll notice that all of your images are back as well, as are our beloved emoticons, including the infamous :foo: We have also worked with our server folks and developers to fix the issues that were slowing down the site.

    There is still work to be done - the images in existing sigs are not yet linked, for example, and we are working on a way to get the images to load faster - which will improve the performance of the site, especially on the pages with a ton of images, and we will continue to work diligently on that and keep you updated.

    Cheers,

    Fok on behalf of the entire Styleforum team
    Dismiss Notice

Suggested winter clothing for grad school in Boston?

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by josepidal, May 4, 2006.

  1. von Rothbart

    von Rothbart Senior member

    Messages:
    2,461
    Joined:
    Oct 29, 2004
    I see your Northern WI and raise you a Northern Alberta.

    How do you define Northern Alberta? Edmonton? Grande Praire or Fort McMurray?
     
  2. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    33,440
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    How do you define Northern Alberta? Edmonton? Grande Praire or Fort McMurray?

    North of Edmonton. I always think of Edmonton as the "final stop".

    Now, for a depressing winter, I've heard bad things about Nunavut (sp? Can never spell that correctly). I never have, and don't really want to ever be forced to. Ughhhh... Except for the Northern Lights, I guess, which would be cool that far North. Still not worth it.
     
  3. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    North of Edmonton. I always think of Edmonton as the "final stop".

    Now, for a depressing winter, I've heard bad things about Nunavut (sp? Can never spell that correctly). I never have, and don't really want to ever be forced to. Ughhhh... Except for the Northern Lights, I guess, which would be cool that far North. Still not worth it.


    Heh when I lived in Vienna I met a girl from Edmonton. She was wearing a skirt and tanktop when it was like 50 degrees out and she thought it was 'balmy'
     
  4. EL72

    EL72 Senior member

    Messages:
    6,860
    Joined:
    May 11, 2006
    Location:
    Toronto
    ...definitely try to find a signifigant other before hibernation season.

    I will give my argument for owning a pair of Sorel or Sorel-like boots:

    Not only are they warm, they come a good 8" up your leg so you don't have to worry about deep snow, and most importantly, since so much salt is used in the NE in the winter, they will last you a couple winters, get caoted with all that crap and you can not worry about them because they don't cost that much.

    Here's a pair at REI that only costs $100.

    And my argument for the expedition-weight (or just heavy-weight) long underwear top is that it keeps you from having to wear too many layers.

    Carry your shoes and change when you get to the office/class.

    Do not go overboard Jose. I lived in NH two years and one was "the worst we had in 25 years" as many told me. The next was mild. But that bad winter was bad.

    bob


    The only argument needed to counter any reason for wearing these is contained in the prior post by nomovement, which I heartily endorse. It's like musical chairs, once the snow hits the ground and the mercury dips below freezing, those who alone will be alone until the spring.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. LA Guy

    LA Guy Opposite Santa Staff Member Admin Moderator

    Messages:
    33,440
    Joined:
    Mar 8, 2002
    Location:
    Moscow, Idaho
    Heh when I lived in Vienna I met a girl from Edmonton. She was wearing a skirt and tanktop when it was like 50 degrees out and she thought it was 'balmy'

    Yep. Edmonton gets pretty cold in the winter. imho, 50-60 degrees is nearly perfect weather. You can wear a sweater or a sweatshirt, and a light jacket over that for fashion if you like, but you don't have to. It's cool enough that you can run a few blocks without breaking a sweat, but warm enough so that you can sit outside with a hot drink and not feel too cold. I like that.

    As for Boston, you don't really need boots at all. It really doesn't snow very much here. Nearly nothing on the ground, even mid-winter. I broke mine out maybe twice last winter. Other than that, I wore sneakers (Chuck Taylors, $38) that were cheap and meant to be banged up, jus like in summer. Just wear thicker socks. And layering is key. I really like layering, so I actually look forward to Boston Octobers and Novembers (October is a near perfect month here.)
     
  6. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Yep. Edmonton gets pretty cold in the winter. imho, 50-60 degrees is nearly perfect weather. You can wear a sweater or a sweatshirt, and a light jacket over that for fashion if you like, but you don't have to. It's cool enough that you can run a few blocks without breaking a sweat, but warm enough so that you can sit outside with a hot drink and not feel too cold. I like that.

    Heh, I prefer 75 and sunny but that's just me [​IMG]
     
  7. josepidal

    josepidal Senior member

    Messages:
    1,924
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    I get a bit chilly already when the temperature drops below fifty and there's a bit of wind. Should I get something heavier than a sweater and a duffle coat?

    I bought one of those Gloverall 65% wool duffles from STP. I saw that they had this new Virgin Wool coat available, and it was put up just when I took delivery of the original one. I was thinking of exchanging it, but the differential is a bit large, $60 with the current 15% off discount, so I thought it wasn't worth it. I'm appreciating softer wool, though, and this "lower line" Gloverall I has great fabric already.
     
  8. fashion_newbie

    fashion_newbie Senior member

    Messages:
    438
    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2006
    Location:
    USA
    Some good suggestions here.
    Any specific suggestions for the top coat? I also need to pick up a top coat for the Chicago winter. I don't want something too long though, preferably a jacket's length. Something practical for campus.
    Jose, don't mean to hijack your thread!
    -fn
     
  9. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    I get a bit chilly already when the temperature drops below fifty and there's a bit of wind. Should I get something heavier than a sweater and a duffle coat?

    I bought one of those Gloverall 65% wool duffles from STP. I saw that they had this new Virgin Wool coat available, and it was put up just when I took delivery of the original one. I was thinking of exchanging it, but the differential is a bit large, $60 with the current 15% off discount, so I thought it wasn't worth it. I'm appreciating softer wool, though, and this "lower line" Gloverall I has great fabric already.


    Sweater and duffle coat sounds like it would be good enough for weather in the teens, at least IMHO.
     
  10. fpo

    fpo Member

    Messages:
    15
    Joined:
    Jul 22, 2006
    Yep. Edmonton gets pretty cold in the winter.

    So does Calgary, which is a little south of Edmonton.

    We had a few days last year where the temperature dropped to -31°F. Try looking stylish when you're wearing ski goggles to keep your eyes from freezing.

    The picture below is on my commute to work. The Bow River is steaming in response to a 15-20 degree drop from previous night. Which means the water (with the floating ice chunks) is actually warmer than the air temperature.

    [​IMG]

    I'm not sure if the winters in Boston are worse, but a huge arctic parka seems overkill. I dress in layers to keep warm: long johns, wool sweaters, long sleeve thermals, polar fleece, GoreTexâ„¢, scarfs. I swear by GoreTexâ„¢, because for me wind is half of the cold. And scarves are great for keeping your neck and face warm or if your body needs extra warm too.

    Living in Canada my whole life I've got quite the collection of insulated jakets, GoreTexâ„¢ shells, soft shells, polar fleece, and wool, but no arctic parka.

    So unless you're going to be outside most of the day, don't buy a huge parka.
     
  11. Jared

    Jared Senior member

    Messages:
    1,635
    Joined:
    Sep 19, 2006
    Location:
    Victoria, BC
    As someone from the warmest part of Canada who went to school in a more representative part, here is my advice on jackets:
    • You might not find a fleece liner warm enough: there is a limit to how bulky fleece jackets get and so you might find you need a parka.
    • I don't have a lot of experience wearing wool in real winter, but you can get peacoats, etc. with Thinsulate liners - that should help.
    • If you're getting a parka, real down, in higher fills is warmer per litre and per gram than any synthetic, but significantly more expensive. (I have a 900 fill, -1C sleeping bag that's shockingly compact and light, but cost $400 retail.)

    Although jackets get all the attention, they're only a small part of a cold-weather system. You lose most of your heat through your head, your feet, and your groin: so get a toque (or even balaclava, considering), heavy hiking socks, and long johns or at least flannel boxers. Cotton doesn't keep you warm once you've sweat in it (which you will as you move in an out of buildings and trudge through snow), so look at wool and synthetics for your under layers. A scarf is one of the few items of winter clothing where you can have fun and be fashionable. Finally, there's nothing quite like mittens! [​IMG]
     
  12. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    As someone from the warmest part of Canada who went to school in a more representative part, here is my advice on jackets:
    • You might not find a fleece liner warm enough: there is a limit to how bulky fleece jackets get and so you might find you need a parka.
    • I don't have a lot of experience wearing wool in real winter, but you can get peacoats, etc. with Thinsulate liners - that should help.
    • If you're getting a parka, real down, in higher fills is warmer per litre and per gram than any synthetic, but significantly more expensive. (I have a 900 fill, -1C sleeping bag that's shockingly compact and light, but cost $400 retail.)

    Although jackets get all the attention, they're only a small part of a cold-weather system. You lose most of your heat through your head, your feet, and your groin: so get a toque (or even balaclava, considering), heavy hiking socks, and long johns or at least flannel boxers. Cotton doesn't keep you warm once you've sweat in it (which you will as you move in an out of buildings and trudge through snow), so look at wool and synthetics for your under layers. A scarf is one of the few items of winter clothing where you can have fun and be fashionable. Finally, there's nothing quite like mittens! [​IMG]


    A parka or balaclava for Boston? Sorry, but are you fucking kidding me? He's not purchasing clothing for an Antarctic expedition, but for probably minutes at most of exposure between a subway station and a building.
     
  13. josepidal

    josepidal Senior member

    Messages:
    1,924
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2006
    Location:
    Boston, MA
    In fairness and as a caveat, I do enjoy walking around to clear my mind. [​IMG]
     
  14. Concordia

    Concordia Senior member Dubiously Honored

    Messages:
    5,778
    Joined:
    Oct 6, 2004
    Yes, but the vast majority of "cold" weather in Boston is just below freezing. There will be maybe 10 days in February when it goes below 0 (F), but for the rest of it, it's more sloppy than really cold.
     
  15. Dan-

    Dan- Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    45
    Joined:
    Aug 9, 2006
    A parka or balaclava for Boston? Sorry, but are you fucking kidding me? He's not purchasing clothing for an Antarctic expedition, but for probably minutes at most of exposure between a subway station and a building.
    Parka..no. But there are definitely days when it's cold enough to be painful to exposed skin, and on those days, something to cover one's face (and potentially rob banks) is nice to have. Most days, however, a wool sweater and a peacoat or car coat with a scarf are sufficient. On very cold days, an additional polarfleece jacket or a wool cardigan under the coat are typically enough.
    The most important article of clothing to stay warm, after a coat obviously, is a good, warm hat--a wool/cashmere beenie works well.
     
  16. Kid609

    Kid609 Senior member

    Messages:
    113
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2006
    You will absolutely need a shell for inclement weather days. No one buys hard shells anymore. Soft shells are just as good unless you're trekking and they are a million times more comfortable and breathable. Get one from Cloudveil, Patagucci, Marmot, North Face, Arcteryx, Mountain Hardware, REI or EMS. or something like the Patagucci infurno, which is a little less tech-looking, but it still has technical construction and layers. It's similar to what people in the Northeast wear day-in and day-out during the deep winter months. [​IMG]
     
  17. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    Parka..no. But there are definitely days when it's cold enough to be painful to exposed skin, and on those days, something to cover one's face (and potentially rob banks) is nice to have. Most days, however, a wool sweater and a peacoat or car coat with a scarf are sufficient. On very cold days, an additional polarfleece jacket or a wool cardigan under the coat are typically enough.
    The most important article of clothing to stay warm, after a coat obviously, is a good, warm hat--a wool/cashmere beenie works well.


    ... I lived in Cambridge for four years and grew up in a much colder environment and I've never worn a balaclava or seen anyone wearing one outside except while skiing. I' m not sure if the onset of global warming has set off some sort of cooling effect in the Northeast or if people have just gotten soft...
     
  18. Joel_Cairo

    Joel_Cairo Senior member

    Messages:
    5,589
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Location:
    Cambridge, MA
    I see your Northern WI and raise you a Northern Alberta.
    I'll raise you an Alta, Norway (google it. its 400 miles above the arctic circle, baby). I call.
     
  19. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
    13,141
    Joined:
    Aug 26, 2004
    Location:
    Orange County, CA
  20. scnupe7

    scnupe7 Senior member

    Messages:
    1,367
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2002
    Location:
    Washington, DC

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by