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Successful accounts of curing depression without medication...

Discussion in 'Health & Body' started by TACO_FLAVORED_KISSES, Jan 24, 2011.

  1. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    My depression story --

    When I was 15 or so, I was diagnosed with depression along with a couple other things. They put me on a variety of medications, but all these medications did was make me feel as though I was on crack for about an hour, then I'd come down and feel like absolute crap again. I told them once what was happening, they upped the dosage. From then on I lied and said it was helping.

    in my senior year of high school (16 or 17yrs old) they switched me to something that I found to be rather addicting, and for awhile I was popping those guys like tic tacs. One day during whatever english course I was taking I realized how shitty living life like this was. And quit cold turkey. Stopped going to therapy, stopped taking pills and just decided to work it all out on my own.

    Now, it was pretty bad for me. I regularly thought of committing suicide. I was terrible in social situations. If a girl I was attracted to looked in my direction, if a teacher called on me, if I had to talk in front of more than 2 people I'd go into what can only be described as thinker's block. I absolutely 100% could not get a thought through. All I could think over and over again was "ALL EYES ON ME ALL EYES ON ME ALL EYES ON ME". It really is hard to explain, because I'd try to get thoughts through. It's similar to when a word is on the tip of your tongue, but you just cant think of it... only apply that to uttering a single noise. My brain basically shut down. Another good example would be trying to get across a river without paddles. What you're trying to do is getting drowned out by all the other crap that's going on (hopefully this made sense). This made me pretty awkward, but somehow I had several different groups of friends, and although at the time I thought of myself as one of the less-liked people in school, thinking back on it now I was pretty popular.

    So -- I stopped taking pills and decided to work through it on my own. I forced myself to go out and hang out with people when all I really wanted to do is stay home and read or play video games. I made myself start and complete projects. Things I worked on to stay busy included building furniture, learning html, css and other website related stuff and I just kept on chugging away. Most recently I started buying leather and started designing and making bags, wallets and other small items. I also ride my bike. All of these things were very important in my growing away from depression. I wouldn't say they cured it. I still have issues I deal with that I can't really figure out how to fix, but maybe eventually.

    Basically, I cured depression by being too busy to focus on whatever ideas caused my depression. I still have the same thoughts on many subjects - I don't have a problem with suicide (if someone wants to go, let them), I don't see a point to life or existence, and I still worry unnecessarily about some simple thing I did earlier that day/week/month but these thought's aren't accompanied with "might as well kill myself". I'd say that is success.

    Of course I also don't really care if I die. I assume this isn't the healthiest outlook, but its better than my outlook before. The only reason I want to stay alive now, and for as long as possible, is to see what kind of amazing things we (humans) accomplish while I still can.

    I am pretty tired, and due to this I feel like this post might be a little scatter brained. If so, I am sorry, but hopefully it is coherent enough for you to follow. If not I'll revise in the morning.



    You got social fobia or squizotypal personality disorder. I had kind of social fobia at that age, then I became a dj and was high all the time, that helped to pass that. Now I got a terrible depression.
     
  2. Pilot

    Pilot Senior member

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    According to the documentary Food Matters. There have been studies that prove high doses of Vitamin B3 (niacin) dramatically affect depression.

    It can take up to several thousand mg per day.
     
  3. PaulYAY

    PaulYAY Senior member

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  4. East2West

    East2West Senior member

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    You got social fobia or squizotypal personality disorder. I had kind of social fobia at that age, then I became a dj and was high all the time, that helped to pass that. Now I got a terrible depression.

    I was thinking social anxiety disorder - same thing really though
     
  5. WoodyStylee

    WoodyStylee Senior member

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  6. Tck13

    Tck13 Senior member

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    This isn't medical advice but...

    While I simply can't understand the stigma (and ignorance) surrounding medication for depression (and there are different kinds of depression which need to be dealt with differently), there are free support groups (typically at local hospitals) for those dealing with depression.

    There are also 12 step support groups for those dealing with addictions and those that are addicted (addiction and codependency and depression / family trauma can go hand in hand).

    This in addition to exercise, St. John's Wort, Therapy, etc...

    Unfortunately, I don't know of anyone beating chronic or clinical depression / Bi - Polar w/out meds. But, then again, I'm not a Doctor so I wouldn't know.
     
  7. scurvyfreedman

    scurvyfreedman Senior member

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    Psychotherapy is very effective with a skilled clinician. Using some herbal remedy is just rolling the dice with your brain chemistry. Drugs may solve the chemical problem, but not treat the underlying issues.
     
  8. JSC437

    JSC437 Senior member

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    Figure out what is bothering you... and remove it from life.

    When someone is depressed... they will usually dwell on something over and over and over and over to the point where it drives them nuts. So once you realize what is going on, you can gain some control. Gain awareness of what your mind is fixated on.

    The best non-medical approach is to simplify life and be more aware of what is causing your feelings. When someone feels the brain going in that crazy cycle... recognize what is going on and stop. I think depression is often the byproduct of not recognizing that your brain is running rampant.
     
  9. Sunnydale

    Sunnydale Senior member

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  10. Godot

    Godot Senior member

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    Part of depression/panic attacks is the context one views their circumstances. As an example right now it's 28 degrees in Chicago. It's January and that's normal to good. I have a friend that views anything short of 70 degrees as impossible to deal with. The guy checks the weather channel every day and his mood fluctuates with the temperature. According to him, a certain depression/sadness is appropriate whenever it's too hot or cold. To me this is crazy. The weather is the weather and I don't left it influence me unduly.
    The Landmark Forum (formally est) has a short program that can help in creating a useful context for your circumstances.
     
  11. FLMountainMan

    FLMountainMan Senior member

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    I've battled depression for most of my life. My kast bad bout was in 2007 - I thought of suicide daily and my roommate almost called in my family. The worst part of it was feeling so awful, knowing that I had a great life, and realizing that if I felt this bad when everything was going great, that I'd never really be happy. Tried anti-depressants but they had weird side effects that I just couldn't take (I got down to 6'2", 145 lbs.) Lost my girlfriend, almost lost my job, cried in front of my entire family, really felt like shit. The only thing that kept me going was the hope that someday I could get over it all, my faith, and knowing how crushed my parents would be if I were to kill myself (I'm the only one of four kids that's "made it", the rest are either in jail or on probation).

    And slowly I got out of it. It took eight months and a change of scenery, but I eventually beat it. It's come back a few times, but I honestly think that dark time gave me the tools to beat it and the confidence to know that it will get better.

    It's gotten to the point where I can feel it coming on, it's a weird feeling in my chest that gradually builds and builds. When I feel it coming on, I stop drinking, work out like a mad man, and spend lots of time with friends. I find church helps, but I realize that may not be everyone's opiate of choice. But do something, take action, don't just sit there. Stay busy, be active, and interact with others. Even if it's phony, act happy.
     
  12. Peak and Pine

    Peak and Pine Senior member

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    You say your last big bout was in '07 and I notice you've been a member here since '06. Have you ever discussed this here before or posted here while in that state? Not meant to pry, but you are a major poster and voice here and I'm interested in your story. Please go on.
     
  13. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    I've battled depression for most of my life. My kast bad bout was in 2007 - I thought of suicide daily and my roommate almost called in my family. The worst part of it was feeling so awful, knowing that I had a great life, and realizing that if I felt this bad when everything was going great, that I'd never really be happy. Tried anti-depressants but they had weird side effects that I just couldn't take (I got down to 6'2", 145 lbs.) Lost my girlfriend, almost lost my job, cried in front of my entire family, really felt like shit. The only thing that kept me going was the hope that someday I could get over it all, my faith, and knowing how crushed my parents would be if I were to kill myself (I'm the only one of four kids that's "made it", the rest are either in jail or on probation).

    And slowly I got out of it. It took eight months and a change of scenery, but I eventually beat it. It's come back a few times, but I honestly think that dark time gave me the tools to beat it and the confidence to know that it will get better.

    It's gotten to the point where I can feel it coming on, it's a weird feeling in my chest that gradually builds and builds. When I feel it coming on, I stop drinking, work out like a mad man, and spend lots of time with friends. I find church helps, but I realize that may not be everyone's opiate of choice. But do something, take action, don't just sit there. Stay busy, be active, and interact with others. Even if it's phony, act happy.


    How did you do?

    Did or do you have any personality disorder? I am an expert on that sadly , PM for more privacy if you desire.
     
  14. SpallaCamiccia

    SpallaCamiccia Senior member

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    Part of depression/panic attacks is the context one views their circumstances. As an example right now it's 28 degrees in Chicago. It's January and that's normal to good. I have a friend that views anything short of 70 degrees as impossible to deal with. The guy checks the weather channel every day and his mood fluctuates with the temperature. According to him, a certain depression/sadness is appropriate whenever it's too hot or cold. To me this is crazy. The weather is the weather and I don't left it influence me unduly.
    The Landmark Forum (formally est) has a short program that can help in creating a useful context for your circumstances.


    That guy got obsessive compulsive personality disorder along with mega hipocondrial ( self done) paranoias, perhaps paranoid disorder personality.
     
  15. Cognacad

    Cognacad Senior member

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    I dont have time right now to read the whole thread, but I have used this book with my clients and it has worked very well for them: http://www.amazon.ca/Mind-Over-Mood-...6358546&sr=1-1 Very popular in the realm of psychotherapy. The earlier Burns book is also good.
     
  16. greamelexon

    greamelexon Member

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    Finally, I should mention that I have taken a position pro-active, making dietary changes slowly when the number of supplements - multivitamins, fish oil, the vitamin B complex and st. Johns Wort, the last two weeks. I also began to socialize, a concept that, unfortunately, has become for me unknown.
     
  17. Man Of The Cloth

    Man Of The Cloth Member

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    It's natural for people to tell you what has worked for them; but let's remember that doesn't mean it's the final answer, or even your answer. A doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine said that each person's condition is like a lock, which requires a particular shape of treatment to open.

    For what it's worth, I'd like to share some lessons that have helped me break through depression and come out the other side.

    Our lives are psychological, physiological (chemical), and energetic, all at the same time. The aspects are interdependent, always influencing and creating each other. Addressing only one of these areas may happen to do the trick and solve the ailment; or it may give some, but not complete, relief; or it may miss the mark and do nothing; or it may increase an existing imbalance and make your situation worse. Taking care of all of the areas of life will be more complete. But the central point is: what is the cause?

    What is the cause? Has a relationship gone bad and created a pattern of poor self-care? Has a dietary deficiency led to chemical imbalance, then affecting mood? Has there been a significant change in the body; or in the emotional life? Even if a cure helps you, if the root cause of the depression is not addressed then it will continue to function, continue to produce depressive results.

    A very helpful combination "” for me "” has been meditation, movement, and expression. I include exercise under the umbrella of 'movement'; but also taking care not to get stuck in things. If I notice my thinking or feeling is getting stuck, or even if I've been sitting in one place for too long, then just about any movement will be helpful: a walk, a run, some weightlifting... or just 'changing the channel' by doing something completely different: splashing cold water on my face, arranging to meet a friend, stepping outside for a minute, etc.

    Meditation and expressive art (I do writing, music, dance, and painting) have both been very useful for me. Both have a very important benefit, which addresses depression directly: they engage you in being with yourself. Energetically, depression is an avoidance of feeling and expression. In depression, the degree to which life flows in to you or out through you is kept controlled, limited. Whether it's anger or sadness or love or whatever feeling, when it's shut down and kept from going in or out fully, that's named 'depression'.

    Taking time to be with yourself, to just sit and feel or just sit and be, for some people at first seems very uncomfortable. That is the pattern of avoiding feeling or running away from one's own mind. But after some investment, some dedication, meditation can be a refuge, where everything is okay. This is not the same as escaping in your mind to a fantasy or a 'happy place'. It should not be a meditation that shuts you down by concentrating on one thing and eliminating all others. It's sitting in openness to whatever is there inside and outside, and getting gradually stronger in being with everything as it is, including feelings.

    Having some form of expression also directly addresses the energetics of depression. If depression is the lack of expression, then expression is immediately a cure. Again, taking some time to feel and to let that feeling out directly addresses depression. (But as I said above, this cure may or may not fix your root cause. If the cause is a chemical imbalance, then regular expression may over time help bring it into balance; but on the other hand it may always remain a temporary cure, in which case a proper herbal or dietary or pharmaceutical remedy may be in order.)

    Expression doesn't have to be artsy. The field of sports, for example, is another place where a lot of people find their outlet. But sports is maybe not so adaptable to some kinds of expression. (Can you skate and make body checks 'lovingly'? LOL [​IMG] ...maybe, maybe not.)

    Finally, I want to mention that for men in particular, being of use is especially important. Our life's work and the work of the day are very important to our sense of well-being. So if you're not getting that sense from your work, you may want to look into a change, or an addition "” doing some fulfilling volunteer work, or just helping the people in your life more. Whole-hearted, generous work is an extremely strong foundation of happiness.
     
  18. TACO_FLAVORED_KISSES

    TACO_FLAVORED_KISSES Senior member

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    Thanks everyone for your responses.

    Ok, so now that some time has passed I've seen some improvements, but I'm realizing that my episodes occur when my self-esteem takes a hit-- this usually occurs when I think about my social relationships. Simply put, I'm not completely reclusive, but I feel as though I lack meaningful relationships with anyone outside my family. I've realized this for a while, but its never bothered me till recently. I can't help but think that part of it is my persona, which might make me come off as cold and unwelcoming. Recently, I've started socializing far more, so I'm not talking a passive approach, but its still quite bothersome. I'm welcome to any suggestions-- books, advice, etc. So please fire away.


    Recap:
    1) Socalizing more, yet still not overly comfortable at times.
    2) Socializng with opposite sex is even more difficult-- should mention I wasn't always like this.
    3) Open to all advice.
     
  19. SirGrotius

    SirGrotius Senior member

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    I found meditation helps. I had a bad bout of depression when I was a teenager, and "cured" it with an SSRI, meditation, and exercise. Now I only exercise and I'm depressed again. Mediation would help but who has time for that in their thirties?

    One other thing I found helpful is embracing being miserable. Having a jaded attitude is very 2010s.
     
  20. Henry Carter

    Henry Carter Senior member Affiliate Vendor

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    I meditate also and am quite time poor. I also asked myself the same question of how do I find time to do it? My question is how do you not find time to do it? If it makes you happy, it's just something you do to make it part of your lifestyle. I only do 10 mins a day and a 1.5 hour class once a week, but it is still better than not doing it.

    We all make the time to do things like clean our teeth everyday and shower and those kind of things, so getting up 10 mins earlier to be happier seems like a no brainer. I get up early at 5.30am to run most mornings so could easily use that as an excuse to not do it, but now get up at 5.20 to meditate before hand. You just have to kind of do it! And make sure you do it during good times too and not just as a remedy when your down.
     

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