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Successful accounts of curing depression without medication...

TACO_FLAVORED_KISSES

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I know there's been plenty of threads on this issue, which generally lead to debates. But for the sake of this thread, I'd like to hear some stories from individuals who have overcome depression via more natural alternatives (meditiation, yoga, 5htp, St. John Wort, Rosea, etc). I hoping this thread becomes a source of optimism for those who suffer from depression, anxiety, panic attacks,etc. Thus, I ask those who favour a "pharmacological" approach to respect the basis of this thread.



PS I'll shortly add my story when time permits.



Thank You all!
 

Timbaland

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Well I just feel depression comes from not being happy with how things in your life are going. If you are depressed you should be proactive and fix where you are unhappy. It could be quitting your job and finiding one that pays a lot less but you enjoy, taking up an activity you always wanted to, going on dates, etc.

I was depressed a few years ago but changed some things up. I think your diet also has to do with it. I think I read fish oil improved people's moods in general. Well for me I took up mixed martial arts and had a few amateur fights and was prepping for a pro fight when I broke my nose training and had to get surgery.

That put me on the shelf for 6 months. It would still hurt when I would scrunch my nose up for like 9 months after surgery so I couldn't really spar. Now it is fine and my parents say I'm crazy for still traiing but I do it because I love the sport and training helps me relieve all the pressure from the stresses in my life.

Another tip I would give to depressed people is to not hold any grudges. It is pointless and a waste of time. I also feel it leads to resentment which can spiral into worse things. There are so many more productive things you can do instead.
 

TACO_FLAVORED_KISSES

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Hey Timberland-- Thanks for responding. I just recently started suffering from what would be considered "depression" in medical circles. It actually started during the 3rd week of December, shortly after finals. During this time I was having chest pains, which I suggest were a byproduct of anxiety attacks. They were pretty horrible as I thought I was having a damn heart attack, which gave way to further sentiments of "impending doom." In the following two weeks the chest pains subsided, but I started having mood swings, which effected my energy levels. For example, I would often just lock myself in my room and watch TV for hours. Eventually the episode(s) would abate and I would go about my day as usual--appetite would also return. Now that I'm back in school, I would say that my condition has improved somewhat. I say "somewhat" because, my episodes are shorter, but they've changed. Instead of having sentiments of sadness/despair, I now feel as though my body goes into fight/flight mode for no apprent reason-- perhaps because I can't stop thinking about this whole ordeal? I don't have suicidal thoughts or any intention of hurting myself, but I am afraid that this first occurance of depression could give way to such deplorable actions-- in addition I occasionly fear the possibility of suffering a mental breakdown. I should mention that I've always been an extremely healthy person (mentally/physically), so perhaps this has intensified this whole situation. I've always had an optimistic outlook (at least personally) on my life, so I'm almost ashamed of sharing my own story. Finally, I should mention that I've taken a pro-active stance by making dietary changes slowly, taking several supplements-- multivitamins, fish oil, vitamin b complex and st. johns wort for the last two weeks. I've even began to socialize further, a concept that sadly became foreign to me. I know I should be sharing this on a different forum, but it feels damn good to get this off my chest. Plus , I now know what I'm going to say when I start attending talk therpay sessions on campus
. PS. Sorry if this post is a bit hard to follow, English is not my first langauge.
 

*#..

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^Good for you. It really does make one feel better to tell others about their problems. No worries, you picked the right place to make a thread on depression. I know it's cliche, but exercising or playing a sport you like really makes you feel better about yourself.
 

Don Carlos

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The best way to treat depression is to stop thinking of it like a disease that can be "cured" by popping some pills -- be they holistic or chemical -- and going about your normal routine. Depression can be managed quite successfully with or without medication or supplements because the brain is highly malleable. You nees to think of it that way. Your brain is not locked into its current state, or even its current physiological form. You can grow and repair neurons through practice, challenge, mindfulness, and positive thinking. But it is probably best to start off in therapy in order to get to a place that is calm and centered enough to then work on long-term, neuroplasticity-based improvements. Start by learning some tactics to reduce or stop depressive episodes when they start. From there, learn techniques for building a positive outlook and mindset for each day. And so on. Approach it like you would a business plan: success is achieved through the execution of a number of incremental steps and tactics; it is not achieved at the flip of a switch.
 

Hombre Secreto

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This might sound like bullshit, but I think exercise helps. I'm not talking about going to the gym either... Things as simple as biking, hiking or running has helped me.
 

East2West

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Originally Posted by Hombre Secreto
This might sound like bullshit, but I think exercise helps. I'm not talking about going to the gym either... Things as simple as biking, hiking or running has helped me.
Its very true! Exercise induced edorphin release is highly beneficial. Also, positive action begets positive energy. I would take an honest look at my life and identify those things that are causing stress, pressure and negative energy - events, place and people. Then I would look at replacing those with positve stimulii or working on altering my perception of it so as to reduce undue negative affects ( an example would be college/university. Its a lot of work and time and energy but an investment and bridge to the future). Sometimes friends can be a negative influence on us too and we can work to increase our social circles by participating in positive activities with other like minded people: join a gym or running club or football team!
 

mm84321

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Originally Posted by TACO_FLAVORED_KISSES
Hey Timberland-- Thanks for responding. I just recently started suffering from what would be considered "depression" in medical circles. It actually started during the 3rd week of December, shortly after finals. During this time I was having chest pains, which I suggest were a byproduct of anxiety attacks. They were pretty horrible as I thought I was having a damn heart attack, which gave way to further sentiments of "impending doom." In the following two weeks the chest pains subsided, but I started having mood swings, which effected my energy levels. For example, I would often just lock myself in my room and watch TV for hours. Eventually the episode(s) would abate and I would go about my day as usual--appetite would also return. Now that I'm back in school, I would say that my condition has improved somewhat. I say "somewhat" because, my episodes are shorter, but they've changed. Instead of having sentiments of sadness/despair, I now feel as though my body goes into fight/flight mode for no apprent reason-- perhaps because I can't stop thinking about this whole ordeal? I don't have suicidal thoughts or any intention of hurting myself, but I am afraid that this first occurance of depression could give way to such deplorable actions-- in addition I occasionly fear the possibility of suffering a mental breakdown. I should mention that I've always been an extremely healthy person (mentally/physically), so perhaps this has intensified this whole situation. I've always had an optimistic outlook (at least personally) on my life, so I'm almost ashamed of sharing my own story. Finally, I should mention that I've taken a pro-active stance by making dietary changes slowly, taking several supplements-- multivitamins, fish oil, vitamin b complex and st. johns wort for the last two weeks. I've even began to socialize further, a concept that sadly became foreign to me. I know I should be sharing this on a different forum, but it feels damn good to get this off my chest. Plus , I now know what I'm going to say when I start attending talk therpay sessions on campus
. PS. Sorry if this post is a bit hard to follow, English is not my first langauge.

You shouldn't be ashamed at all. It is very admirable that you are so open in expressing yourself and acknowledging your issues, which is already a step in the right direction. Was there something in particular that occurred during the third week of December that you can pin point? As much as I'm a proponent for natural remedies as a means of alleviating symptoms of depression, they will only work marginally until you are able to identify the root of what brought this anxiety onto you in the first place. For this, talk-therapy is essential. I suggest you also look into Sophrology, which, combined with forms of transcendental meditation and yoga, is a very effective form of reducing symptoms of depression. Good luck.
 

Geoffrey Firmin

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TACCO_FLAVOURED_KISSES

I have a black dog, I identify the bastard as a 350ib Rottweiler with an attitude I had my first bout of depression at 19 and didn't have it properly diagnosed til I was 26. From what your saying it sounds like your working out a way to deal with it which is a big positive. It also sounds like your describing anxiety attacks, they can be a right bastard. I used to get at times I'd wake up at 2am and feel the stress and tension is somehow running counter clockwise in my body. When that happens just focus on your breathing it may take time but it helps. If you can identify specific triggers which cause the anxiety attacks then you should be able to seek assistance to devise a strategy to over come then, but this take time. Be patient and be persistent. For me it took years to work it all out.

The thing I have found over the years is to identify the warning signs for depression, like when the bastard starts rattling his chain, if you identify a problem even by using a metaphor it helps you get some distance and perspective on it which in turn enables you to take action to put it back on the leash. Its good to learn to identify the physical and mental onset signs, and as soon as they appear take appropriate action. For me it either up the ante on the exercise and cut right back on the booze or a useful tip is when you start thinking negative thoughts just imagine who ever is saying them is in a straight jacket and zip their mouth up. Over time you'll find what ever works for you and stick with it.

The best thing is a combination of diet, exercise and talk therapy and most of all develop an appropriate mental strategy to deal with it. And there is nothing to be ashamed about sharing your story. I find its easier on a forum like this where there are minds sympathetic to your plight rather than group therapy sessions, tried it once not for me. I prefer one on one sessions, I only need a couple its the act of venting it and having somebody who is totally objective to your life, comment upon it that allows me that mental distance to get the situation back under control.

The best thing though and I know it can be hard is to take action and deal with don't let it overwhelm you and good luck to you.
 

blazingazn

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a prof i had who was an expert in the field and does lectures on anti-depressants worldwide, stated simply that 30mins of moderate physical activity 3-4 times a week is the same or better than taking pills.

he honestly and truthfully believed in it.

unless you have a chemical imbalance physically affecting you, there are ways naturally, that you can allevate your symptoms.



have you looked into light therapy. do you feel depressed when it rains or is gloomy outside.
i had this issue for a long time.
 

Timbaland

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Hey taco. Good luck with this man. Like others on here have said exercise is a great way of helping out. I would lift weights and play bball a lot when I was in college and it helped. The best thing to do is to always try to stay busy. Socializing is important. Laying around doing nothing except watching tv is no good for you.

Try to take at least 1 fish oil pill capsule with every meal. I take 2. Feel free to PM me if you need anything.
 

East2West

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Originally Posted by aphextwin07
"smoke weed everyday"

hehe..wait..what were we talking about again?

Seriously though that's no good. When your high sure you're fine but afterwards you can become amotivational, lathargic and cognitively impaired. Those longer term affects may just perpetuate your depression depending on your triggers. Actually those weed effects are concomitantly drug side effects and depressive disorder signs.

As fun as it might be, I wouldn't suggest it to treat depression
 

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