Style Profile: Bertie Wooster

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by Connemara, Aug 15, 2006.

  1. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    And that was the thrust of the genre, in general.
    British literature is concerned with insulting the upper classes in ways they won't understand. An exception might be Woolf.
     
  2. Britalian

    Britalian Senior member

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    As a devoted fan of the brilliant BBC adaptation of P.G. Wodehouse's "Jeeves & Wooster", I thought it would be a boon for those SF members unfamilar with the show to have a look at what I consider the greatest costuming ever done for a television program.

    Hugh Laurie (now in an entirely opposite role as Dr. House) made a splendidly buffoonish Wooster. His clothing was absolutely spectacular. It's very easy to admire the classic English gentleman style carried off so well by Wooster, always proper in both town and country attire. The following stills are from a single episode...more shots will be added in future postings.


    As good as the Beeb are at such period things, I think on this occasion the series was on ITV (one of the commercials). I note on Amazon (UK) the complete series is available on DVD for thirty-five quid, old boy!
     
  3. Lucky Strike

    Lucky Strike Senior member

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    There was an incident with spats, was there not? Lavender spats?
    I think they were tartan.
     
  4. whoopee

    whoopee Senior member

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    British literature is concerned with insulting the upper classes in ways they won't understand.

    An exception might be Woolf.


    Woolf is none too kind to the upper classes (the system in general) and her work is harder to understand than Wodehouse and Waugh. However, her critiques are more complex and conflicted than insulting.
     
  5. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Woolf is none too kind to the upper classes (the system in general) and her work is harder to understand than Wodehouse and Waugh. However, her critiques are more complex and conflicted than insulting.
    Yes, that was my point since Waugh, Wilde, Thackeray et al. simply put it out there albeit with puns, and other thinly disguised ways that are never quite apparent to their targets. Woolf's criticism is similar to Joyce's what with him calling Ireland an old sow(sic) who eats her farrow.
     
  6. Tuerney1

    Tuerney1 Well-Known Member

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    Lady Circumference and Lord Tangent are two of my all-time favorites! [​IMG]

    And I like Hugh Laurie's wardrobe in House. To be honest, having moved from the ivy league and business worlds to the artistic, I wish I dressed more like that. [​IMG]
     
  7. tancredi

    tancredi Active Member

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    While very pleasing in aesthetics, the important thing to remember is that Jeeves & Wooster was intended, in the best British tradition, as a rather scathing depiction of the middle, and upper classes.
    Bah! What nonsense. Wodehouse is never scathing. Bemused, yes. Gently satirical, perhaps. Scathing never. If anything, he offered forth his writings to a world he saw succumbing to the creeping conformism of bourgeois democracy as a testament to the possiblity of eccentricity afforded by aristocracy. He spent enough time in America to be well aware what was coming.
     
  8. LabelKing

    LabelKing Senior member

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    Bah! What nonsense. Wodehouse is never scathing. Bemused, yes. Gently satirical, perhaps. Scathing never. If anything, he offered forth his writings to a world he saw succumbing to the creeping conformism of bourgeois democracy as a testament to the possiblity of eccentricity afforded by aristocracy. He spent enough time in America to be well aware what was coming.
    Yes, perhaps scathing was too strong a word but my point was that Bertie & Wooster was not intended as some think: a straightforward bucolic portrayal of upper-life.

    Scathing is Dorothy Parker, and Shaw.
     
  9. tancredi

    tancredi Active Member

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    Quite right. Rabble rousers.
     
  10. tancredi

    tancredi Active Member

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    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Connemara
    "It's very easy to admire the classic English gentleman style carried off so well by Wooster, always proper in both town and country attire."

    "Easy to admire - yes - but those familiar with the television series and the books will recall the running theme that some aspect of Wooster's attire was frequently improper - to the dismay of Jeeves."

    So true. Was it Wooster who once experimented with a moustache?
     
  11. epa

    epa Senior member

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    I haven't read Wodehouse for maybe 25 years, and at that time I was not able to appreciate things I guess I would appreciate today. I will certainly re-read some of his books. Suggestions?
    By the way, and that is funny, although I cannot remember almost anything of what I read of Wodehouse, I think that he has had a severe impact on my way of dressing: I recall a phrase like "Gentlemen don't wear brown", and for years I did not consider getting a brown suit... Now, I recently decided to give it a try and had one made (very dark brown, subtle stripes, Dormeuil cloth), and at present it is clearly my favourite one.
     
  12. Associate

    Associate Senior member

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    I haven't read Wodehouse for maybe 25 years, and at that time I was not able to appreciate things I guess I would appreciate today. I will certainly re-read some of his books. Suggestions?
    By the way, and that is funny, although I cannot remember almost anything of what I read of Wodehouse, I think that he has had a severe impact on my way of dressing: I recall a phrase like "Gentlemen don't wear brown", and for years I did not consider getting a brown suit... Now, I recently decided to give it a try and had one made (very dark brown, subtle stripes, Dormeuil cloth), and at present it is clearly my favourite one.


    Funny, I've started to read 'Life with Jeeves' recently and couldn't make it past page 50. I know Wodehouse is a sacred cow of sorts, but to get to the really funny tidbits you have to traverse a lot of tiresome and naive storylines. I would say, buy the DVDs instead. The adaptation is supebr and they've done a good job of weeding out the 'filler' stuff.
     
  13. Lucky Strike

    Lucky Strike Senior member

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    As good as the Beeb are at such period things, I think on this occasion the series was on ITV (one of the commercials). I note on Amazon (UK) the complete series is available on DVD for thirty-five quid, old boy!
    Bought! Cat's pyjamas!
     
  14. Britalian

    Britalian Senior member

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    Bought! Cat's pyjamas!

    spiffing, what?!
     
  15. aarghh

    aarghh Senior member

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    Funny, I've started to read 'Life with Jeeves' recently and couldn't make it past page 50. I know Wodehouse is a sacred cow of sorts, but to get to the really funny tidbits you have to traverse a lot of tiresome and naive storylines. I would say, buy the DVDs instead. The adaptation is supebr and they've done a good job of weeding out the 'filler' stuff.
    The "filler stuff" is what makes Wodehouse. His talent for buffoonery on the side has rarely been equaled.
     

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