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STEAKS!!!!!!!

saint

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Headed to a new steakhouse tonight and wanted to see if anyone has experience with long dry-aged restaurant steaks. For example, the menu has a 45 Day Dry Aged Akaushi Bone-In Ribeye 32oz for 2 for $115. The same steak aged for 90 days is $135 and aged for 150 days is $170. I have been to dozens of high end steakhouses and never see this on a menu.

My question, is this bullshit? Will dry ageing it longer make that much of a difference?
At David Burke’s Prime House in Chicago I had a 48 day aged bone-in rib eye, and it was amazing. Incredibly tender with complex flavors I had never experienced before. I’d definitely do the 45 day, and go back for the others until you find the sweet spot for your taste buds.
 

venividivicibj

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Pretty fucking good at 45 days. The owner actually took us back to the dry age freezer for a look. Smells awful.
I'd be wary of trying some of those super aged stuff until you know you like those ultra aged character. Sometimes it can overwhelm the steak (and those added flavors can sometimes be really funky)
 

DavidLane

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We have a local butcher who brings in whole animal, and dry ages full ribs at 120+ days. It really just intensifies the aged flavor, which if you like can be great. They do not always do a perfect job removing all of the rancid fat and mold, which if you do not do, can make for an unpleasant experience.

I always look for and do some additional trimming at home before I season and cook. As long as you or the restaurant trims well, it should be great. Again presuming you like the flavor of aged beef.

DL-
 

Piobaire

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Outside at 7a, 29 degrees F, to fire up the Big Joe and start beef cheeks and pork butt for tonight's taco fest. About eight hours from now will have shredded and crisped pork carnitas and shredded beef cheeks for stuffings with all the fixings on the table for folks to make their own. Hand tossed flour tortillas from a little old lady that has a cart/kiosk outside of the carniceria I use.

9BA59904-43F9-4B53-A4B8-D1B48E72D7DE.jpeg
85D5C70A-D3C1-41D2-B227-F0D3C643F90F.jpeg
 

Omega Male

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Had a superb 8-hour-roasted prime rib at The Whaling Station in Monterey this weekend. A real old-school joint. Started with the prime rib egg rolls just to be consistent. Oh boy, I could eat a bucket of those, then die happy.
 

beargonefishing

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We have a local butcher who brings in whole animal, and dry ages full ribs at 120+ days. It really just intensifies the aged flavor, which if you like can be great. They do not always do a perfect job removing all of the rancid fat and mold, which if you do not do, can make for an unpleasant experience.

I always look for and do some additional trimming at home before I season and cook. As long as you or the restaurant trims well, it should be great. Again presuming you like the flavor of aged beef.

DL-
That steakhouse just opened a butcher shop on the mall side where they just started selling the dry aged beef for home cooking. I really don't have much interest in beef dry aged over 60 days because it sounds kinda nasty. Count me out anytime a process can potentially lead to an unpleasant experience.
 

Gus

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Seeing @Piobaire 's taco bbq reminded me of my very favorite steak taco recipe. (Esquire used to have a lot of great recipes). The secret, just make sure the cut of meat isn't tough or gristly and use this easy to make rub with blended spices. Top with all your usual taco favorites including fresh squeezed lime. I also like to use smoked Spanish paprika for additional flavor.

I make up a big batch of the rub (3 or 4x the amount) and keep it in a sealed container so its ready for a quick round of beef tacos.

https://www.esquire.com/food-drink/food/recipes/a6176/steak-tacos-recipe-ll-0307/
 

beargonefishing

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I have always thought reverse-sear means you sear before cook, and regular sear means searing after cooking. I just looked at a treager recipe for reverse seared pork chops that calls for cooking before searing.

My question. On a scale of 1-50, how right or wrong am I?
 

brokencycle

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I have always thought reverse-sear means you sear before cook, and regular sear means searing after cooking. I just looked at a treager recipe for reverse seared pork chops that calls for cooking before searing.

My question. On a scale of 1-50, how right or wrong am I?
500 wrong. Reverse sear has always been cook slow first and sear at the end.

This is because traditionally you seared first to "seal in the juices"
 

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