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STEAKS!!!!!!!

te0o

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Im guessing you live in an EU member state and your butcher identifies which country the beef comes from? I'm really just curious about the logistics here. Do you prefer vaca vieja? Especially dairy cows? Thanks in advance.
I live in the UK. I buy from a relatively small butcher shop so I’d say it’s probably not too difficult for them to identify the country of origin.
What I generally get is indeed older grass-fed meat from ex-dairy cows (Galician, Simmental). The Galician is obviously from Northern Spain, but the Simmentals come from all across Europe like Germany, Finland, Netherlands (even Poland sometimes). Also some UK wagyu-angus cross, but that comes from much younger animals.

I find the older ex-dairy stuff often has a more concentrated flavour and firmer texture, and much better marbling. I like both really, but I’d say value for money is better on the older grass-fed stuff (vaca vieja).
 

edinatlanta

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I live in the UK. I buy from a relatively small butcher shop so I’d say it’s probably not too difficult for them to identify the country of origin.
What I generally get is indeed older grass-fed meat from ex-dairy cows (Galician, Simmental). The Galician is obviously from Northern Spain, but the Simmentals come from all across Europe like Germany, Finland, Netherlands (even Poland sometimes). Also some UK wagyu-angus cross, but that comes from much younger animals.

I find the older ex-dairy stuff often has a more concentrated flavour and firmer texture, and much better marbling. I like both really, but I’d say value for money is better on the older grass-fed stuff (vaca vieja).
Thanks! I thought I would have more questions but this covers everything.
 

vdubiv

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I live in the UK. I buy from a relatively small butcher shop so I’d say it’s probably not too difficult for them to identify the country of origin.
What I generally get is indeed older grass-fed meat from ex-dairy cows (Galician, Simmental). The Galician is obviously from Northern Spain, but the Simmentals come from all across Europe like Germany, Finland, Netherlands (even Poland sometimes). Also some UK wagyu-angus cross, but that comes from much younger animals.

I find the older ex-dairy stuff often has a more concentrated flavour and firmer texture, and much better marbling. I like both really, but I’d say value for money is better on the older grass-fed stuff (vaca vieja).
I find it interesting that while I was living in the EU recently you can easily source meat from other regions at your local butcher and everything is identified, even at restaurants specializing is beef, you choose your country of origin.

Now that I'm back stateside, there is barely a local butcher anywhere outside of the grocery store, and unless I go to Wegman's I can barely even call those people butchers.

Also there is no origin for the beef, it's just beef in the meat case, take it or leave it
 

edinatlanta

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My parents are retiring so we celebrated.

They had 60 day dry aged ribeye (phenomenal) i had the steak frites sub onion rings because my dad got a side of fries.

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Not pictured: deserts (fine but i preferred the desert wines) seafood tower and sides (roasted mushrooms seasonal carrots creamed spinach).

It's crazy how steakhouses are temples to meat but the sides are what really do it.
 

Jmr928

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Lizard23

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It's crazy how steakhouses are temples to meat but the sides are what really do it.
i love steakhouses and have strong opinions about them, yet I would be the first to tell you that I dont understand why.
 

TheFoo

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Okay, I did reverse sear last night on a 2.75 inch thick cut of wagyu NY strip. I salted the steak the night before and let it sit uncovered in the fridge.

The sear was indeed far more efficient than when done the traditional way: only 45 seconds needed per side, versus ~2 minutes.

But, I must have done something wrong! Came out much worse than when I do it traditionally (sear first followed by oven finish), with an egregious amount of well-done, tough banding.

Help.

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Lizard23

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200F. About 45 minutes.
I think something is off. An almost 3 inch steak shouldnt get to temp that fast. Do you have an oven thermometer? Maybe your oven runs at low temps? Assume you aren’t using convection.

edit: i just looked at kenji’s time appx for 1.5 inch steaks at 250. It would also make it seem your oven is too hot.

0AE2DB78-EF55-4886-8A40-5B503666060B.png
 

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