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Starting wardrobe

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by vc2000, May 18, 2004.

  1. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    I'd say you are right CT,

    But I cannot understand it when you say that a suit is not needed for everyday buisness wear.

    I've never seen it in both the UK, and other countries.
     
  2. discostu004

    discostu004 Well-Known Member

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    specifiy "for the money", meaning what price are you saying a boss suit will cost? if you're in the 4-700 range, it would take about 2 seconds of looking to get soemthing far superior for the same or even less money
     
  3. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    A Boss suit will cost you something like 200-500 pounds (though they can go up to 1100), that means they start at $340. (@ Rate 1GBP=1.7USD)

    I would like to know what brand is better for that money? Unless of course you are talking about a sale, but I've seen Boss suits on Sale for 150 pounds; that is like $255
     
  4. FIHTies

    FIHTies Well-Known Member

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    Kalra:

    Whats hapening more and more nowadays in corporate America, and even in the real white collar professions, (lawyers, Accountants, Banker and Financial Positions) is that the suit is being passed over in favor of whats known as Business Casual.  Essentially what it means is be comfortable but stay respectable.  No Abercrombie and Fitch getups but the suit is not that necessary.

    On the general topic I have to agree with the thought process on this thread thats pushing Fiscal Responsibility.  Many of these students are in school but for the grace of the US Govt and student loans which will eventuall become due and payable.  3K-5K is alot of money by all means and for a guy to go out and spend that (post tax dollars might I add) kinda $ on clothing is a little much.  Better teach them that although a suit that is bought for 1000 is better than a suit that is bought for 250, a person has to know his means and its not a crime to wear a 250 dollar suit at all.  yes, a ferrari is a better car than a hyundai, but at a certain point the value (equated by use, need and budget) of buying a ferrari is just not there.  especially if the person is gonna wet their pants if they get a pull in a $2000 suit.

    JJF
     
  5. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    I was under the impression that every jacket that is not paired with a pair of pants is a sports jacket, and that the blazer name was only reserved for jackets that mimic the one used on the HMS Blazer (a DB navy blue jacket with a 6-4 configuration and brass buttons), or variations of the jacket thereof. I could be mistaken though, anyone know for sure? Jon.
     
  6. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    If you said Sports Jacket in England, they would think it is something you would wear to play sport in, such as on the Golf Course, like a windbreaker, made from nylon or such the like. I think this is just a language difference and not a technical difference. In the same way that you guys keep saying pants, that, to people in England means underwear. Â [​IMG]
     
  7. discostu004

    discostu004 Well-Known Member

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    i mean if you do minimal searching on ebay you can find a good quality new suit for $350 that is far better than boss. i'm not a boss fan, obviously, as i had one boss item before and it was trash. i've bought brand new Brioni cashmere sportcoats on ebay for $300 (lucky i know, but it's there). when you're talking about your appearance, one thing to keep in mind: DON'T SETTLE
     
  8. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Wait...how would you say pants then? Would you use trousers instead? Jon.
     
  9. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Stu, you are very right, but even I, I repeat I, know that students can't buy serveral Bironis, moreover what would be the point, they are only employees, if they look like the Chariman, they look stupid. Perhaps they could get away with one at a board meeting, or such the like, and that is why I suggested 1 Bironi. In addition, you say ebay, of course you can do some hunting, but I was giving a regular way, i.e. no outlets, no sales, no internet.

    Jon,

    Yes, that is what everyone here calls them, also Slacks and Flannels are unheard of.
     
  10. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    trousers
    Yes, that is what everyone here calls them, also Slacks and Flannels are unheard of.
    I see. Plus, the English might put buttons on my slacks if I ask for them to be cuffed next time I go to Saville Row. [​IMG] Jon.
     
  11. discostu004

    discostu004 Well-Known Member

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    true, but i see nothing wrong with looking better than some. what if the higher ups dress like slobs? where i work there are plenty of people over me who are wearing a jacket that's 15 years old they got at some cheesy department store for $99 and it shows. should i, or anyone, strive to be below that? that example is not an exaggeration.

    also, the guy is posting on the internet, so you have to assume he has the net and can at least check stuff out. sure the discount stores will have some good stuff, but what if he's nowhere near one? i am 6 hours from the closest NM last call, but i get stuff on ebay all the time
     
  12. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    Two problems there for us British Jon, what you Americans call cuffed pants, we would call turn-ups, which are ridiculous in this day and age anyways, I mean who on earth would wear turn-ups, except some 90 year old, wearing brogues or tassel shoes (I know that in the US a lot of people DO wear tassel shoes, but in England people just find them ridiculous). And, I don't realy know what Slacks are anyway, I would assume they are a type of formal trouser. And no, they would not put buttons on if you said to have them cuffed.
     
  13. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    But, of course I was kidding about the buttons on the slacks. Americans (and Canadians too for that matter) tend to muddle the name of trousers into a culmination of pants / slacks / trousers. Yes, I recall reading that the English do not favor turn-ups, they tend to like straight-hemmed trouser legs, regardless the application of the trouser (dress, casual, what have you...).

    I notice that most Americans tend to wear cuffed (turn-ups) trousers with one outfit or another. I personally think that pleated pants would have them (my wardrobe reflects as such), and I am hardly 90 years old. Straight hemmed seems very casual, very khakis / jeans to me. I guess opinions and customs / styles differ at either end of the pond.

    Jon.
     
  14. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    I think the main thing, and this is no insult, but in the N. America, if you were to dress in what we British would call an old-man style, then it is considered formal, and decent. However, in the UK, and Europe for that matter, dressing fashionably, does not always mean that you do not look formal, or decent. But then again, in the US fashionable is A&F, and T-Shirts and Shorts, to the best of my knowledge, whereas fasionable in Europe is D&G, Dior Homme, Fendi, Gucci, Prada, with high quality italian jeans and l/s shirts. But then again my view of what's fasionable in Europe may be slightley jaded, as I live in London, and though my view my also apply to Milan and Paris, I doubt it applies to Birmingam, Manchester, or any other small European city or town. [​IMG]
     
  15. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    I think that in order to make up for one extreme, with the t-shirt culture, they go to another extreme, with the tassel shoes, turn-ups, large lapels, tab collars, double breasted suits, leather strap watchs and colligate ties in N. America. (I do realise that may of these were initially British things, such as double breasted suits, large lapels, and the Oxbridge Union Tie, but they have certainly become out of fashion now)
     
  16. TKDKid

    TKDKid Well-Known Member

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    Well, I was only thinking in the context of a new grad's starting business wardrobe.  After you've established yourself there and the money's coming in, it's up to you what you spend it on, and hey, if looking good at work's your thing...

    I'm quite lucky in that RTW suits fit me fine (a very good thing cos I trash them so easily), but I probably wear nicer shoes than most people at work, even if they're just seconds from the Northampton factories.  Don't think I'd ever get a bespoke suit though, for example - given what the seniors are wearing, that would just be overkill on my part.
     
  17. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    Well, lets set aside that I live in Palm Beach County, where most of the customers at the local Bentley dealership(s), go and purchase their automobiles whilst wearing a polo shirt, shorts and some type of loafer (many times sock less). With the heat reaching near a scorching 90 Fahrenheit degrees for weeks at a time in the summer, not to mention the enormous amount of humidity, wearing heavier D&G, Dior Homme, Fendi, Gucci, Prada, with high quality Italian jeans and especially long sleeve shirts can easily become a quick way to face massive dehydration, which when placed in the face of fashion, wins every time. As well, lets wet aside the larger-than-average per capita income in the PB County. When looking at the average American, then yes the staple of khakis and GAP t-shirts seem to dominate the landscape, but if you compare London (as we have established, a very expensive city) to say Manhattan (similarly expensive), then the style and fashion of dress becomes a lot more similar and you will see D&G, Dior Homme, Fendi, Gucci, and Prada on the street. There are some American items that made their way across Europe, such as the removable collar and the button-down shirt collar. Plus Brooks Brothers pioneered the concept of RTW suits; but Europe does not produce any RTW items, do they? [​IMG] I would think that it is better to appear less fashionable and to appear more classic (stylish), to appear that your clothes fit perfectly (well, almost perfectly; nothing is perfect after all is it?). If you walk in one of the aforementioned cities, you are more likely to see people wearing expensive designer wears than to see someone wearing a clothing item that properly fits. Jon.
     
  18. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    All agreed except, Milan is also very hot, but I don't see them wearing rubbish, so not realy an excuse [​IMG]
     
  19. imageWIS

    imageWIS Well-Known Member

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    It's not only the heat that kills us; it's the humidity. What's wrong with DB anyways? I think a 6-4 configuration is very flattering on the right man. Also, strap watches is a not primarily American style; it is an obvious European one. Just look at the current Patek, Vacheron, etc... catalogues and take a look at the strap versus bracelet ratio, and every time there will be more strap watches. Jon.
     
  20. kalra2411

    kalra2411 Well-Known Member

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    DB, are allright, and yes they can look very good on some, but for most they fit very poorly, and lead to the bag effect. And they are coming back in, in Europe, but they were out for a long time.

    With the leather watch strap, as with many of the other items I mentioned, come from Europe, but they are not preffered, metal straps are, though as with DB suits, they are coming back in, albeit black not brown, as is the case in N. America.
     

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