1. Welcome to the new Styleforum!

    We hope you’re as excited as we are to hang out in the new place. There are more new features that we’ll announce in the near future, but for now we hope you’ll enjoy the new site.

    We are currently fine-tuning the forum for your browsing pleasure, so bear with any lingering dust as we work to make Styleforum even more awesome than it was.

    Oh, and don’t forget to head over to the Styleforum Journal, because we’re giving away two pairs of Carmina shoes to celebrate our move!

    Please address any questions about using the new forum to support@styleforum.net

    Cheers,

    The Styleforum Team

    Dismiss Notice

Starting over. Where shoud I move to?

Discussion in 'General Chat' started by marblehouse, Dec 1, 2011.

  1. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,191
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    I also mentioned Detroit.

    Seriously, nothing like the melancholy pervading a failing rust belt city for someone that just got out of a long term relationship.
     
  2. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    I'll offend a lot of people by saying this, but...:

    I wouldn't live in any other American city but San Diego, Denver, Seattle, Portland, Boston, NYC, San Francisco, or Chicago (and maybe a couple more I have forgotten). People can say what they want about how Cleveland and Cincinnati are "up and coming cities" or how Phoenix and Scottsdale are a great "bang for the buck" but the fact of the matter is that second tier cities like that suck. They're sprawled out, they have little in the way of culture, the culinary scene is usually garbage, and you'll lose touch with the finer things in life the minute you settle down.

    Life is too short to live in crappy cities, no matter what you might try to tell yourself.
     
  3. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,191
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    Lulz @ Portland or Denver being in a higher tier than Scottsdale. Portland = 97% white. Right there it's hard to recommend.
     
  4. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    

    Scottsdale is a terrible place to live unless you are interested in retirees and golf. Portland wouldn't be my first choice but at least they have interesting restaurants and you can move around without spending $500 on gas every month.

    As I said, you can tell yourself whatever you want but there are only a handful of cities in the US that can offer enough for someone who has even a passing interest in art, culture, good food, etc.
     
  5. Kid Nickels

    Kid Nickels Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,658
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Location:
    Zulu minus 7
    

    I grew up in Cincinnati and did my undergrad in Cleveland!! How dare you!! ;) haha... I don't disagree with you in the least... in fact b/c of my preference for warm weather I couldn't see myself living anywhere in the US but LA or San D.
     
  6. ZhiMingBuFanDe

    ZhiMingBuFanDe Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    386
    Joined:
    Apr 17, 2010
    Location:
    San Francisco, CA
    Time seems to move slower in San Diego...
     
  7. Kid Nickels

    Kid Nickels Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    8,658
    Joined:
    Nov 18, 2010
    Location:
    Zulu minus 7
    

    yeah it does... reminds me of Australian beach culture.... like "no worries mate!" kinda vibe.
     
  8. Svenn

    Svenn Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,716
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008

    I agree with this except, and maybe I'm just tired of the PNW, but I really don't think Seattle and Portland belong in the same category as Boston or NYC. There's a lot of 'counter' culture in the PNW but that's about it... just as an example, there's only 1 medical school in all of washington and 1 in oregon, and only a couple more law schools- in boston and nyc there are dozens, that are the best in the world, so you get a much higher concentration of highly educated young people. Yes there are a scattering of hip/classy restaurants, but they tend to be imitative of something you'd see on the east coast anyway.

    To me, being able to split my time between a very rural and very urban location would be ideal... nothing in between.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  9. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,457
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    The Temple of Jawnz
    

    If you think about it, and if you really take this whole 'reinvention' thing literally - neither would matter.
     
  10. Jamesgatz

    Jamesgatz Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,434
    Joined:
    Mar 4, 2010
    Seconding PSguy, how about moving abroad? Netherlands, for example, has a lot to offer. There's a guy over at WAYWRN who could you a few tips about local sense of style etc.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2011
  11. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,457
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    The Temple of Jawnz
    

    From my experience, your list is pretty generous. I wouldn't want to live in any of those cities except NYC, and with quite a number of clauses too I guess. On the other hand, if I was single and ready to mingle, had something to do with my days and had enough money to have fun, there'd be nothing better than picking on corny coeds in a big college town in the midwest. Not a sustainable course in life, but if it were me and I were single, I could live in a larger sized college town and have a great small business, make a bunch of money, get my pick amongst a bunch of women, and generally live the good life.
     
  12. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    

    I guess that could work if you wanted to be knee deep in coed poontang. If you actually want to do anything else besides bang sorority chicks though, living in Columbus or East Lansing would suck fiercely.

    And regarding the Portland/Seattle thing, I would live there but neither would be my first choice. Honestly North American cities I'm open to live in right now are basically Boston, SD, Montreal (current), Toronto, NYC, and that's probably it.
     
  13. Svenn

    Svenn Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,716
    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2008
    I think there's something to the fact that the older a city, the better the quality of life tends to be there. People wonder why the French and Italians seem to so consistently have nice cafes/bakeries on every corner, quiet leafy boulevards, and no shortage of culture for evening activities; it's because humanity has lived in those areas for far longer and thus been able to focus on the finer things in life. The farther west you go from the old continent, the more spread out, commercial, and barren the cities seem; the final conclusion being a place like bakersfield california or any generic sprawl which has no downtown, no walkways or congregating places, and no culture.
     
  14. Piobaire

    Piobaire Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    50,191
    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2006
    Location:
    In My Douchemobile
    

    :laugh:

    So, how often does one indulge their interest in "art?" How does one indulge in it? I ask this as I've found people often misprioritize metrics such as this when discussing locations. Oh, and btw? Funny you riff on Scottsdale as it has a thriving art scene. I can remember being there one time and this whole section was having an open house, at numerous galleries, all serving interesting refreshments. A quick Google yielded this: http://www.scottsdalegalleries.com/ Looks like I didn't show up for anything special but they in fact have it every Thursday. Over 100 galleries.

    Again, back to Portland? Not diverse. That's one of my metrics.

    Now, don't think I'm saying Scottsdale = Chicago or NYC or anything like that. Also, in many ways a good case can be made Cleveland, Detroit, etc. are shitholes. In fact, in many ways they certainly are. However, they also have redeeming qualities, are near cities with other attractions (Detroit is a few hours from many great cities, such as Chicago and Toronto), and do possess a certain mood you can't get in other places. Getting back to art and culture, Detroit's DIA is fantastic. I used to trudge through two feet of snow to use my student ID to enter for free and eat lunch in the Diego Rivera botanical courtyard. It has several live theatres, including the Hilbury and Bonstelle, both of which I have been to many times. It has this great old warehouse of old and used books called Jonathan King. I loved that place and the finds I'd get there.

    I'm just saying folks get all haughty over silly metrics on what a "good life" consists of and what the only good places to live are.
     
    1 person likes this.
  15. Texastyle

    Texastyle Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,604
    Joined:
    May 7, 2011
    Austin might be worth looking into. It has a great music scene and plenty of interesting restaurants and things to do. It never gets too cold and there are always plenty of people out doing outdoorsy things and you get the benefit of it having a major university.
     
  16. rnoldh

    rnoldh Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    13,557
    Joined:
    Jul 24, 2006
    Houston is a fantastic place to live.

    Everyone that I know who has moved here loves it.

    That does not mean everyone that has moved here but those that I know.
     
  17. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,457
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    The Temple of Jawnz
    

    What do you do in your free time that a reasonably sized American town can't cater to? Highly experienced BDSM? Come on man. I know for a fact that a college town can satisfy your basic needs for awhile, they are designed to - and well, they're nicer than the real world too, in many ways.
    It's nice to talk mad shit about cities but really, the only thing that will affect the average person's life day to day is the tax rate, the weather, and the people. If you think you have finer taste than the locals in an American locale you will end up buying your shit online, so who cares? I don't know if you're out waiting for Scott Schumann to snap you or what, so I guess that is a possibility, but really, American big town near a city, American city that is not New York - you're getting the same thing.
     
  18. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    

    If you like Scottsdale and Detroit, good for you. But both those cities suck and I think most people I know would agree. One is a post-industrial waste zone and the other is a sprawling mess of traffic jams, golf carts, and Olive Gardens.

    As I said, you can write paragraphs and paragraphs about how a certain crappy city is "on its way up" but I only plan on living once, so why waste it living in a city that sucks, waiting for it to get good?
     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2011
  19. Lord-Barrington

    Lord-Barrington Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,811
    Joined:
    Sep 20, 2010
    


    What do I do on a normal Saturday? I walk around the city, dropping into galleries and cafes and cool little stores, then at night I eat at a nice restaurant and go to a show or a movie. Can I do that in Scottsdale, Kansas City, or Memphis?

    No.

    People who pretend that all cities are more or less created equal and you just need to make the most of it have never lived in a world class city.
     
  20. impolyt_one

    impolyt_one Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    14,457
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2006
    Location:
    The Temple of Jawnz
    That is cute man, but you are talking a lot of poop - Kansas City has one of the finest art galleries in your country, as it so happens.

    I don't believe cities are created equal, and so I live in Tokyo. No city in America besides NYC would do it for me at this point, as I've said, and even then, I prefer Tokyo.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by