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St. Patrick's Day

Discussion in 'Entertainment, Culture, and Sports' started by Ambulance Chaser, Mar 16, 2005.

  1. Ambulance Chaser

    Ambulance Chaser Senior member

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    Sounds like a bad scene.  I've decided to pass and have a quiet dinner at the local bookstore restaurant.  I'll probably order a Guiness in honor of the day, however.
     


  2. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    brian,
    i completely agree with everything nonk has said. it's annoying to me to hear americans say they're italian or irish or mexican when they've never even been to that country, don't speak the language, and know very little about the culture. real italians root for their national soccer team, not for the red sox. real mexicans don't join gangs, don't wear nfl jerseys, and they don't celebrate cinco de mayo. (it's not a holiday in mexico.)

    say "my ancestors were irish" or something like that. saying you're irish when you were born and raised in the u.s. is ridiculous.

    at least the blacks say 'african-american'--not just 'african'.
     


  3. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    Though I don't really understand how why Italian Americans, Irish Americans or any people of European descent call themselves anything aside from American or White American. But, I do understand why Mexican- Americans or Hispanics call themselves Mexicans or whatever nationality. They aren't generally accepted for whatever race they are in America. Mexicans of pure European decent for the most part wouldn't be accept as white, nor would Dominicans of African descent be accepted as Black.
     


  4. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    About the myth of this "national dish":

    From "Irish culture and customs".

    It was in the late 19th century that it began to take root. When the Irish emigrated to America and Canada, where both salt and meat were cheaper, they treated beef the same way they would have treated a "bacon joint" at home in Ireland: they soaked it to draw off the excess salt, then braised or boiled it with cabbage, and served it in its own juices with only minimal spicing - may be a bay leaf or so, and some pepper.

    This dish, which still turns up on some Irish tables at Easter, has become familiar to people of Irish descent as the traditional favorite to serve on Saint Patrick's Day. Certainly, there will be many restaurants in Ireland that will be serving Corned Beef and Cabbage on March 17th , but most of them will be doing so just to please the tourists.

    The truth is, that for many Irish people, Corned Beef is too "poor" or plain to eat on a holiday: they'd sooner make something more festive.
     


  5. Nonk

    Nonk Senior member

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    Fabienne you will be telling us next that not all Frenchmen wear hooped jumpers and black berets and ride old fashioned bicycles around quaint peasant villages selling onions which they wear on a rope around their necks?

    Don't believe her folks, in Ireland everyone eats this 3 times a day, it gives us enough energy to carry the pig under our arms while wearing our hats with the big buckle on the front and puffing away on our clay pipes begorrah etc etc.


    Ps
    Utter Bollocks, who was it posted this rubbish originally?
     


  6. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    a young fedora wearing goatee sporting dandy by the name of Linux. nice enough guy, needs a few years of maturing, though.


    F,

    that seems to be true with a lot of ethnic foods. "Jewish food" in the states has nothing to do with the food eaten by most jews outside of the states.

    but once a year to eat something unusual, like corned beef, why not?
     


  7. Nonk

    Nonk Senior member

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    I actually had corn beef hash last week, Mrs Nonk and I both like it from our Army days.
     


  8. Bradford

    Bradford Current Events Moderator

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    I have to admit, I love corned beef and cabbage - and as I've gotten older, I've realized that the best thing about St. Patrick's Day is the fact that the grocery stores actually sell corned beef at a reasonable price at this time of year. I ate corned beef, cabbage and potatoes for dinner last night and I have two other corned beefs sitting in my freezer for that day a few months from now when I have a craving for this meal again [​IMG] Bradford <-- no Irish ancestry to speak of... P.S. It must run in the family as my 21-month old son did a great job of eating the pieces of corned beef we cut for him last night.
     


  9. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    I like how they cut it thick in for st Patric's day - it's just something a little different from typical deli corned beef. sunday taking my son to a parade in a little village with a huge irish ancestry, and we'll have another corned beef lunch, see how he likes it.
     


  10. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    Oh, of course. It's just that, when I tell people it's not exactly as popular in Ireland (and probably doesn't even taste the same), they typically look at me funny. Because it's me telling them, I think they eventually believe it. When I have visitors from abroad, I often serve them Corned beef as a typical American dish.

    For Eastern European style Jewish food, what do you think of the restaurants in Le Marais, in Paris ? For having grown up with Polish grand and great grand parents, the dishes seem pretty authentic. And I like the house cat at Goldenberg's. Hmm, and their poppyseed cake...
     


  11. globetrotter

    globetrotter Senior member

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    (globetrotter @ Mar. 18 2005,15:32) F, that seems to be true with a lot of ethnic foods. "Jewish food" in the states has nothing to do with the food eaten by most jews outside of the states. but once a year to eat something unusual, like corned beef, why not?
    Oh, of course. Â It's just that, when I tell people it's not exactly as popular in Ireland (and probably doesn't even taste the same), they typically look at me funny. Â Because it's me telling them, I think they eventually believe it. Â When I have visitors from abroad, I often serve them Corned beef as a typical American dish. For Eastern European style Jewish food, what do you think of the restaurants in Le Marais, in Paris ? Â For having grown up with Polish grand and great grand parents, the dishes seem pretty authentic. Â And I like the house cat at Goldenberg's. Hmm, and their poppyseed cake...
    mmmm.... jewish food in Paris, yum. I don't get there anough anymore, or for long enough trips, so I usually eat in one of two places that I really like and don't get to the enthic resterounts, but now that you remind me maybe next time.
     


  12. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    i don't understand your post. it's not about being white or black or being accepted--it's about being american or (fill in blank)-american.

    if you're born and raised in this country, and your granparents happened to be dominican, but you've never lived there, never been there, and don't even speak spanish, you have no business going around telling people you are dominican. you are nothing like a dominican. it's that simple.
     


  13. jpeirpont

    jpeirpont Senior member

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    It would be that simple if people were accepted as simply American, but thats not the case. So people tend to refer to some nationality when describing themselves.
     


  14. matadorpoeta

    matadorpoeta Senior member

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    i think we're not understanding each other. i have no problem with a guy saying that he's of dominican descent, or calling himself dominican-american. i'm not arguing that. but there's a big difference between saying &quot;i'm dominican-american&quot; and saying &quot;i'm dominican.&quot; too many people cross that line like it doesn't mean anything and they look stupid doing so.
     


  15. Fabienne

    Fabienne Senior member

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    I remember being a little confused by it when I first lived in the US. If someone said to me: &quot;I'm Italian&quot;, I'd usually reply, &quot;Oh, where from&quot;, which would in turn confuse THEM.
     


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