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St. andrews suits

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by kabert, Jun 24, 2004.

  1. JErwin

    JErwin Active Member

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    Mar 26, 2004
    I think RLPL must have a number of silhouettes available.   I have purchased several of the suits over the past couple of years from the RL store in Dallas, and the waist/chest ratio on all of them is pretty standard (the chest averages around 44, while the waist is in the 40-42 range).  The newest one I have (purchased in Feb.) does have a larger chest, but it is also drapier and, if anything, has less waist suppression.  In fact, I would say that my suits look fairly similar to the St. A suits Andrew is auctioning.

    I know RLPL takes some flak for being too theatrical/costume-like, but I have found that the line has plenty  of great-looking "conventional" options available rtw.  In other words, you can buy RLPL off the peg without all of the English-Country-Estate-Circa-1930 flourishes if you want.  I wear mine to work and don't ever feel the least bit anachronistic in them.  (Granted, I'm a butler for Lord Shiftenberry.  Jk.)  Who knows, maybe the Dallas store gets the more conservative stuff.  Wouldn't surprise me.
     
  2. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    I see all but three of the St. Andrews suits have been sold.That's some pretty quick action. Great stuff at a great price, so not entirely surprising.
     
  3. A Harris

    A Harris Senior member Dubiously Honored

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    Good point JErwin. I haven't gone into a Polo store and tried on all the suits - I'm only going off of the models that I've owned or sold. So they could indeed have a number of different models, some of which I may not have seen.

    I'm surprised they are selling faster than the Barbera's are. Maybe because of the fabric??
     
  4. retronotmetro

    retronotmetro Senior member

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    I'll bet it's the lapel style. The Barberas roll cleanly to the middle button instead of rolling to (or above) the top button like most contemporary 3-buttons. I actually did a double-take on the picture because the Barberas look like two-button suits at first. The St. Andrews is probably a more accessible/familiar style.
     
  5. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    As to why the St. Andrews suits would move quicker than the more well-known Barbera brand, my brother (a former New Yorker and now a S.F. area resident) told me that California, the South, and the Sunbelt residents have little need for "winter" flannel. This limits the audience. Even in the colder states, it appears that a year-round wardrobe of "supers" is supplanting the old concept of two seasonal wardrobes of flannel suits in the winter and "tropical" or lightweight cotton in the summer. Land's End preaches that it's more economical to wear its year-round suit. I myself am not sure that the "year-round" suit can be worn in subarctic conditions or that it looks right.
     
  6. STYLESTUDENT

    STYLESTUDENT Senior member

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    To continue with my speculations, Barbera is a product of northern Italy, acknowledges English influences, and therefore usually includes flannel in his lines. Kiton and Attolini are products of Naples, where flannel is a punishment in the heat. Perhaps this is why you so rarely see these lines carry flannel (have never seen one on "Worlds Finest" Ebay store). Alan Flusser,in all his books, still touts seasonal wardrobes. But he is a not-so-secret admirer of Brooks Brothers in the '60's, where "tropical", linen, and seersucker vanished from the shelves in September and "year-round" was unknown. Yes, most top-end New York stores still carry heavier weight suits, but it takes money and an interest in style (especially, retro style) to avoid the less costly "year-round" wardrobe. Sorry for the length of this.
     
  7. kabert

    kabert Senior member

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    Frankly SS, I love seasonal clothes. Very lightweight wools or silk/cotton blends are only appropriate in the summer where I live and are a joy to wear -- very luxurious. On the other hand, I've got a couple of heavy cotton suits and several heavy wool slacks and wool/cashmere shirts that I love wearing in the fall and winter (but would be impossible to wear in the spring or summer). I long, long ago dismissed the idea that I'd be too warm wearing them in my office. Not at all -- perfectly comfortable (and I don't have individual climate control for my office at work). At the beginning of the next season, I bring out of garment bags my old friends from 6 months earlier.... Shoes too.
     
  8. Alias

    Alias Senior member

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    This makes sense to me. Also, I get the impression that suits made of those really light summer fabrics tend to be less durable.

    Seeing as how I'll most likely be moving to a more temperate climate in a year (where it doesn't snow) I'm stocking up only on super 1xx's suits.
     

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