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Spychip Levis

Discussion in 'Streetwear and Denim' started by denimdestroyedmylife, Jan 19, 2007.

  1. drizzt3117

    drizzt3117 Senior member

    Messages:
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    Location:
    Orange County, CA
    let's just assume they are accurate, even though their credibility is questionable to say the least. they even admit in the article that the tags are external:

    While Levi Strauss reports that its current RFID trials use external RFID "hang tags" that can be clipped from the clothes and the focus is on inventory management, not customer tracking, the company isn't guaranteeing how it will use RFID in the future.

    then they go on to assume that the next step is embedding the tags in the clothing...i realize everyone is pissed that levi's is protecting their trademark, but c'mon these tests mean nothing...and there's zero evidence that they actually plan to move forward with external tags.


    I guess I don't really understand why people have anything to fear from Levi's. It's not like the National Security Agency is planting tags in your Levi's, unless you're paranoid enough to think that NSA is behind it all. Do you think Levi's is really in the business of tracking millions of people around the country? What could they possibly gain from that? They're a denim manufacturer, not Homeland Security.
     
  2. Coulomb

    Coulomb Senior member

    Messages:
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    Oct 22, 2006
    1. it's not that ppl are scared of levis, they just don't appreciate the _possibility_ of a large corporation or another agency leveraging this technology to encroach on our privacy.

    2. i don't see why levis wouldn't use this as a marketing tool. it's actually very effective because it would enable them insight towards where their product is most concentrated, how often it is worn, and who wears it. it's almost like compounding interest. people buy their product, and in return their customers provide valuable data for these companies to further increase their market share. it's not a bad deal.

    3. this is a totally different subject than parcel tracking. in that arrangement, u as the customer know very well that this item will be and should be tracked. furthermore once this tracking is completed, 9 times out of 10 the parcel in which the rfid resides is disposed of. as a customer buying clothing, why should i expect that there be hidden rfid tags to obtain precious consumer information? it doesn't make any logical sense and it is reasonable to assume that such products don't come with these devices.

    4. with that being said, i don't think rfid tags are that big of a deal. the range on these things are pretty small, like a few meters if that. I don't think a clothing corporation like Levis has the money or power to pull off such a stunt.
    If there was to be some ploy by the government to setup a rfid monitoring scheme, the infrastructure required would be rather large and the most information they would learn is probably stuff they knew anyways. just look around u, there's already hundreds of cameras watching the streets everyday.
     
  3. dtmt

    dtmt Senior member

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    Nov 15, 2006
    Fuck that. Taser ftw.
    Nuke them from orbit. It's the only way to be sure.
     
  4. abefroman

    abefroman Member

    Messages:
    20
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2007
    1. it's not that ppl are scared of levis, they just don't appreciate the _possibility_ of a large corporation or another agency leveraging this technology to encroach on our privacy.

    2. i don't see why levis wouldn't use this as a marketing tool. it's actually very effective because it would enable them insight towards where their product is most concentrated, how often it is worn, and who wears it. it's almost like compounding interest. people buy their product, and in return their customers provide valuable data for these companies to further increase their market share. it's not a bad deal.

    3. this is a totally different subject than parcel tracking. in that arrangement, u as the customer know very well that this item will be and should be tracked. furthermore once this tracking is completed, 9 times out of 10 the parcel in which the rfid resides is disposed of. as a customer buying clothing, why should i expect that there be hidden rfid tags to obtain precious consumer information? it doesn't make any logical sense and it is reasonable to assume that such products don't come with these devices.

    4. with that being said, i don't think rfid tags are that big of a deal. the range on these things are pretty small, like a few meters if that. I don't think a clothing corporation like Levis has the money or power to pull off such a stunt.
    If there was to be some ploy by the government to setup a rfid monitoring scheme, the infrastructure required would be rather large and the most information they would learn is probably stuff they knew anyways. just look around u, there's already hundreds of cameras watching the streets everyday.


    not to be rude, though it may come off that way, but did you read the articles?

    these tags are external. they weren't going to be permanently attached to your clothing...they probably had more in common with a security tag than a so-called spy chip.

    you do have one thing right, though. the range on rfid is pretty short.

    i also doubt levis would have deals with other establishments; so in a worst case scenario the only thing they would ever be able to track, if the apocalypse of jean tracking ever came to pass, is when you entered and exited one of their stores.
     
  5. batorizer

    batorizer Senior member

    Messages:
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    OKC
    rfids really are neat devices and their use in inventory management could prove to be very valuable. Imagine being able to take inventory of an entire warehouse in a few minutes. i don't think rfids could be used to collect demographic data, as previously stated, they have a very short range. however, an rfid reader paired with an electric deadbolt and a programmed rfid on your keychain would be way cooler than using a key. and of course it's all available on ebay
     

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