Split yolk function on shirts

Discussion in 'Classic Menswear' started by francisco_bt, Feb 28, 2011.

  1. francisco_bt

    francisco_bt Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    Is the split yoke purely eye candy or does it serves a fitting purpose?

    I've heard that striped shirts need to carry this yoke, but what about ones with checks, herringbone, etc? What about solid colors?
     
  2. Harold falcon

    Harold falcon Senior member

    Messages:
    27,426
    Likes Received:
    7,602
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Location:
    NE PA
  3. francisco_bt

    francisco_bt Active Member

    Messages:
    36
    Likes Received:
    1
    Joined:
    Jan 20, 2011
    My bad I was feeling hungry. Thanks for the article, short and precise.
     
  4. cold war painter

    cold war painter Senior member

    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    45
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Location:
    Mamucium
    They appear to consider and dismiss what I thought was the actual or original reason for a split yoke:

    In fact, they seem to dismiss it on the grounds they (a MTM shirt business) don't do it, which seems a bit self-serving to me.

    I can follow their argument that a split yoke has persisted in non-bespoke shirts due to strength advantages, but I'm pretty sure the original reason was for adjustments to fit in a bespoke shirt. I don't see how this would exaggerate asymmetry.
     
  5. cbbuff

    cbbuff Senior member

    Messages:
    1,251
    Likes Received:
    43
    Joined:
    Apr 12, 2010
    Location:
    Boulder, CO
  6. landshark

    landshark Senior member

    Messages:
    1,716
    Likes Received:
    51
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2010
    They appear to consider and dismiss what I thought was the actual or original reason for a split yoke:



    In fact, they seem to dismiss it on the grounds they (a MTM shirt business) don't do it, which seems a bit self-serving to me.

    I can follow their argument that a split yoke has persisted in non-bespoke shirts due to strength advantages, but I'm pretty sure the original reason was for adjustments to fit in a bespoke shirt. I don't see how this would exaggerate asymmetry.



    Read the whole article
     
  7. Will C.

    Will C. Senior member

    Messages:
    220
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2010
    Read the whole article

    Indeed, interesting.

     
  8. Journeyman

    Journeyman Senior member

    Messages:
    6,777
    Likes Received:
    1,818
    Joined:
    Mar 29, 2005
    Location:
    Brisbane, Australia
    Indeed, interesting.


    It's a good point, but even that doesn't make a great deal of sense, at least nowadays.

    Looking at shirts of mind that have split yokes, most of them have not orientated the fabric diagonally - it is still horizontal. In fact, I think that the only shirts of mine with split yokes that have diagonally-oriented fabric are my bespoke H&K shirts. All the others are oriented horizontally.

    Therefore, I would have to conclude that nowadays, split yokes are by and large simply a cosmetic feature, rather than a practical feature on most shirts.

    I also think that the most-often cited reason, that of "fit" - that is, the idea that having a split yoke allows for a more precise fit - doesn't make a great deal of sense.

    If you are making a shirt for someone, why not just cut one side of the yoke longer than the other if you need to make it fit? It doesn't require a split yoke to have one side of the yoke longer than the other.
     
  9. Kurt N

    Kurt N Senior member

    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    0
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2010
    Location:
    So Cal
    Looking at shirts of mind that have split yokes, most of them have not orientated the fabric diagonally - it is still horizontal. In fact, I think that the only shirts of mine with split yokes that have diagonally-oriented fabric are my bespoke H&K shirts. All the others are oriented horizontally.

    Therefore, I would have to conclude that nowadays, split yokes are by and large simply a cosmetic feature, rather than a practical feature on most shirts. ...


    Given that a horizontally-oriented split yoke is assembled from smaller pieces, there might actually be a savings of fabric because of less waste. If one makes shirts someplace where labor is cheap compared to fabric, and can then turn around and sell the shirts at a premium because the split yoke is seen as a mark of quality, that's a two-fold advantage.

    I'm pretty sure I read something like this at AskAndy, but I can't find the thread now. Either that or I'm just imagining I read it. But it makes sense to me.
     
  10. phxlawstudent

    phxlawstudent Senior member

    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Unless its a bespoke shirt, the only advantage I see is pattern matching.
     
  11. Redwoood

    Redwoood Senior member

    Messages:
    1,610
    Likes Received:
    10
    Joined:
    Jan 8, 2010
    A split yoke cut on the bias does feel stretchier and more comfortable.
    For this, the inside yoke has to be cut the same, though, i.e., outside split and inside one-piece is probably not going to work.
    Of course, you could cut a one-piece yoke on the bias, but that would look weird with patterned fabrics.

    Of course, this only applies for a close-fitting shirt. If your shirt is loose or you have pleats, then it probably doesn't matter.
     
  12. acecow

    acecow Senior member

    Messages:
    4,135
    Likes Received:
    680
    Joined:
    Dec 18, 2009
    Location:
    Not Manhattan, unfortunately
    Unless its a bespoke shirt, the only advantage I see is pattern matching.

    Ahhh... Pattern matching is worse with a split yoke, because the sleeve pattern and the yoke pattern meet at an angle.
     
  13. phxlawstudent

    phxlawstudent Senior member

    Messages:
    1,194
    Likes Received:
    3
    Joined:
    Dec 6, 2009
    Ahhh... Pattern matching is worse with a split yoke, because the sleeve pattern and the yoke pattern meet at an angle.

    ?

    I meant matching vertical stripes. But i we're on the same page, please explain.
     
  14. cold war painter

    cold war painter Senior member

    Messages:
    547
    Likes Received:
    45
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Location:
    Mamucium
    Read the whole article

    I did. As I said, structural argument - fine. Assertion from a MTM shirtmaker that an asymmetrically tailored bespoke shirt is going to make me look freakish - not so convincing.
     
  15. 1969

    1969 Senior member

    Messages:
    2,684
    Likes Received:
    968
    Joined:
    May 23, 2007
    Not reading the article, but my understanding is that a split yoke is needed when the shoulders are cut differently. This makes sense, as the back of the pattern would need to be adjusted to fit the front. A one piece yoke may not lay flat if it's attached to two differently sized shoulders.
     

Share This Page

Styleforum is proudly sponsored by